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If you're of an ethnic minority, how do you react to someone saying this Watch

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    (Original post by effofex)
    Well, of course anyone can answer any question how they wish. I cannot obviously dictate how they answer it.

    But surely if someone asks where you are from, and then if you answer by stating a nation that you have not been born in or lived in it may appear as though you have misinterpreted the question.

    Asking someone where they are from =/= asking their ethnic origin. People can not be born in multiple cities or multiple countries (in practice) BUT can still have heritage from a whole range of countries.

    Maybe the responsibility lies with whoever is asking the question to be more specific with what they want to know - i.e. ethnic origin/nationality/birthplace, rather than a vague 'Where are you from?'.
    When people ask ethnic minorities 'where are you from' they usually do mean ethnically, and it's understandable because people are curious and that's human nature. That's just the way it is, stop being so pedantic.
    9/10 time I can tell what answer they want, otherwise I rephrase the question of ask them to be more specific. I have no problem answering at all.
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    (Original post by lukejoshjedi)
    As in someone not of ethnic minority, you've met, you're getting along and you start talking about personal things - your family, past schools, where you're from etc

    "So where are you from"

    You answer casually, seeing as you were born in the UK, nothing weird

    "No, but where are you from"

    You may think that's like straight from a comedy skit and it never actually happens but it does, anyway if you're asked that and you're from an ethnic minority, how do you / would you react?

    Anyone got real and funny experiences of a conversation like that they want to share?
    Welll.....I've usually got this situation in reverse.
    I tell them where I'm from and the reaction is 'WHERE? You aint english?'
    Only cos I don't look or sound foreign.
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    I wouldn't have a problem with telling them where i am from
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    Some people have done this so the second time I usually say (quickly in a stereotypical indian accent for an increased comedy-effect): yea was born in india been selling curry ever since but managed to jump onto a boat got off in italy, then got on the back of a lorry and hey presto im here talking to "joo" right now sir!
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    I purposely say London to make it awkward :teehee:

    "So, where you from?"
    "London"
    "Yeah, but where are you from?"
    "Oh, North London."
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    (Original post by lukejoshjedi)
    As in someone not of ethnic minority, you've met, you're getting along and you start talking about personal things - your family, past schools, where you're from etc

    "So where are you from"

    You answer casually, seeing as you were born in the UK, nothing weird

    "No, but where are you from"

    You may think that's like straight from a comedy skit and it never actually happens but it does, anyway if you're asked that and you're from an ethnic minority, how do you / would you react?

    Anyone got real and funny experiences of a conversation like that they want to share?
    Well people only usually ask this if they know my fulll name (I'm white but only half English and I have a foreign name lol).

    I wouldn't be offended or anything, I'd just tell them where my family originate from.

    As for funny stories, merely the fact that no one can say my name right. Not only is it foreign, it's rare in it's country of origin. :facepalm:

    The only people who can get it right are usually Indians/Pakistanis /other South Asians for some reason! No idea why as it's not even from that region of the world.
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    (Original post by gm15)
    How do you know they aren't just asking where you live?
    You wouldn't but if they asked you again after you told them where you're from, it would seem as if they were asking where in terms of your racial background, birth parents country etc as opposed to where you live

    If they wanted to ask you where you lived, they'd ask you where do you live
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    (Original post by style)
    When people ask ethnic minorities 'where are you from' they usually do mean ethnically, and it's understandable because people are curious and that's human nature. That's just the way it is, stop being so pedantic.
    9/10 time I can tell what answer they want, otherwise I rephrase the question of ask them to be more specific. I have no problem answering at all.
    I doubt anyone has a problem with answering such a question - but if someone poses a vague question, it's likely they'll get a vague answer. Nobody said there was anything wrong with curiosity. It makes it so much simpler to ask somebody what their ethnic origin(s) are if that's what they want to know, rather than confuse people with 'where are you from?'. I have asked people in London of many different ethnicities that and usually they tend to say where they were born.
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    (Original post by Jacktri)
    lol i found out that my friend's dad dumped his girlfriend because she had a half cast daughter
    Half-caste?

    we are not half pure or anything of that sort.
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    (Original post by Jingers)
    I purposely say London to make it awkward :teehee:

    "So, where you from?"
    "London"
    "Yeah, but where are you from?"
    "Oh, North London."
    Lol so they have to keep rephrasing the question to get the answer they want from you. I've only ever had that question asked from people in my own race (other black people haha)

    I've never really had a white person ask me, Oh but where are you from, so I have no personal experience with it. I wouldn't really be offended but I would be annoyed at the idea of someone (whatever race they are) being so ignorant to assume someone middle eastern, or Indian looking, or any random black person can't be born in the UK and is always born in Africa or Asia
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    i wouldnt get offended, i would just laugh in their face and ask if they want to know about my ethnic origin, and reply accordingly
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    (Original post by effofex)
    How is this about ego? Surely it is about logic?

    If you are born in London how can you feel you are not from London? If people ask 'where you are from' they are not asking about your cultural, religious, political or ancestral background. They are most probably asking where you were born.

    If they wanted to know your ancestry, surely they would ask something to the effect of 'what is your ancestry?' or 'what is your ethnic origin?' instead. This is not about creating offence or being offended - but simply about being accurate.

    If you asked somebody who is born in London, but whose ancestors have lived in Lancashire for most of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, the chances are they will still say they are from London (rather than Lancashire). They might still like pies though.
    I agree, but people still have strong connections to their countries of origin. I was born here, but my father's family are not English, and I was bought up to embrace the cultures from both sides (my mother is English). Therefore, when asked does my 'country of origin', so to speak, feel like a home to me, I would answer that it does. I've been bought up with it, it's a part of me and my family, and I have a very strong affinity for it. However, I feel the same about England. So both are my 'home', if that makes sense. That's why some people may prefer to say their country of origin.

    However, I would say I'm from England, unless someone said "No I mean where are your family from?" or something like that.
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    hahaha, Ive had so many conversations like that
    'where are you from?'
    'what, do you mean like where i was born or where i 'originate' from?'
    'erm, both?'

    bless 'em, i love people that aren't afraid to ask me stuff, ASK AWAY
    and to the person that said that your from where your born, i don't think that's true.
    i was born in France but I'm definitely not french.
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    (Original post by Jingers)
    I purposely say London to make it awkward :teehee:

    "So, where you from?"
    "London"
    "Yeah, but where are you from?"
    "Oh, North London."
    If the questioner is really after your ethnic origin the convo should go:

    "So, where are you from?"
    "London"
    "OK, but what is your ethnicity?"
    "[insert ethnic origins here]"
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    If people ask me where I'm from, I tend to assume they're asking about my ethnicity. One graduate taking a seminar on bhangra (to which I was the only attendee ) asked me whether he should presume I'm Indian. I told him he shouldn't presume anything about me in the first place :cool:
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    You see, I don't even get "where are you from", I get "Are you Spanish?"
    (I realise I'm not an ethnic minority, but I still think your point stands with me :dontknow:)
    I try to explain, that I am not Spanish, nor are my parents. My great grandmother from my dad's side was Italian, and she has passed her olive skin down the family, that's it. "Oh, so you're Italian then"...no :no:
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    (Original post by .Ali.)
    I agree, but people still have strong connections to their countries of origin. I was born here, but my father's family are not English, and I was bought up to embrace the cultures from both sides (my mother is English). Therefore, when asked does my 'country of origin', so to speak, feel like a home to me, I would answer that it does. I've been bought up with it, it's a part of me and my family, and I have a very strong affinity for it. However, I feel the same about England. So both are my 'home', if that makes sense. That's why some people may prefer to say their country of origin.

    However, I would say I'm from England, unless someone said "No I mean where are your family from?" or something like that.
    Your country of origin is the UK, but you may have family/employment ties to other nations. You cannot be 'from' a country you were not born in. Many people on this thread seem to be confusing cultural behaviours they have imbibed with their actual birthplaces. I was born in Bangalore but sometimes wear an Arab headdress - this doesn't mean I am 'from' the UAE.

    Of course people can answer the 'Where are you from' question however they like though - but it still seems a vague question to ask if the questioner is specifically interested in the respondent's ethnicity.
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    (Original post by effofex)
    Your country of origin is the UK, but you may have family/employment ties to other nations. You cannot be 'from' a country you were not born in. Many people on this thread seem to be confusing cultural behaviours they have imbibed with their actual birthplaces. I was born in Bangalore but sometimes wear an Arab headdress - this doesn't mean I am 'from' the UAE.

    Of course people can answer the 'Where are you from' question however they like though - but it still seems a vague question to ask if the questioner is specifically interested in the respondent's ethnicity.
    I wouldn't say the country of origin is the UK, because the persons family didn't originate from there. For example, my father was born here, but both his parents were from the same country. He was brought up pretty much in that culture. So he's born in the UK, but he's more 'foreign' than not, if that makes sense.

    I agree it's a bit vague. If someone wants to know, I won't be offended, I'd much rather they just came out with "Oh so where does your name come from, it sounds foreign? Are your family not from England?" or something like that.
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    I don't mind when people ask, annoying when they try to crack a joke about the place or start talking about the things that happen there. I'm like :erm:
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    I'd just tell them that my father's from Jamaica and my mother's Burmeese. It's pretty obvious that they are just curious, it's an innocent question, after all.
 
 
 
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