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    (Original post by Chimaira)
    your video in your sig is shameless propaganda. if you cant see that you are slightly stupid.
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    (Original post by Tarutaru)
    OH, my fu**king god... SOAs idiots do not even have the basic intelligence to understand maths!!! OK, let us be more precise XD

    I know many SOAS idiots want to defend their deparment. As a fact, SOAS economic department is one of the crappest in this country.

    As mentioned by one of the defenders XD, SOAS economic idiots are those rejected by UCL and LSE. Get a life, I know many SOAS idiots like mental masturbation.
    Please enlighten us, are you a university student? What course are you studying? where do you base your confidence on to criticise another university's department?

    My guess: You're a UCL/LSE reject, ended up at SOAS doing Economics and hate it because you don't understand the less narrow-minded students around you.

    Fortunately for me, neither employees nor other universities have a problem with SOAS' economics department.

    But what I'm most interested in: you agree with me that many SOAS economics students are LSE and UCL rejects. But, how on earth can you judge students based on this? From my experience (having studied at SOAS and LSE while having been close to quite a few UCL economics students and their societies), LSE goes for outstanding personalities (and competes with Oxbridge) while UCL goes for reputation (schools, prices and such shallow things; competing with Warwick, Nottingham, Bristol, SOAS, Manchester, ...). For both, competition is fierce. No, for all three, it is fierce: the SOAS economics department has a 13:1 applicantslace ratio for their undergraduate degrees and requires AAA. While the average SOAS economics student might not be as outstanding as the average LSE one, so what? And while this is not related to London: I cannot see any gap between the good SOAS economic students and the good Warwick economics students in ability and potential. I would argue in as similar way with regard to good UCL economics students.

    (Original post by Tarutaru)
    A soas idiot like you would never have a chance to to look at these textbooks, which are the most advanced maths textbook.

    Yes, they are not very different XD XD because a SOAs idiot is lacking the basic intelligence to understand maths XD
    You're kidding, right? Seriously, a second year physics student (I'm just guessing - it does apply to second year engineering students at decent universities in Germany, though) can just laugh about how 'advanced' it is.

    That being said, SOAS economics' math is apparently sufficient for LSE's runner-up flagship course, the MSc Finance. I would agree that it is not sufficient for a quantitative-based Masters in economics, but it's not suited for or meant to be a pre-requisite for such a degree. What would even be the sense of doing such a programme anyway? Doing a Masters in econometrics, statistics or (applied) mathematics would open you more doors and would make you more money afterwards while the "political economy" part is barely touched at universities such as UCL. A Masters in (quantitative) economics is just the easier choice than doing a proper quantitative subject.

    (Original post by Tarutaru)
    Dude, you know what, if a SOAS idiot can get into such a program, one of the best graduates of the five super elite universities in the UK can also get into the program you are talking about XD I know you are pissing your pants because of the inferiority of SOAS and your a-level maths level XD

    Oh, having only a-level maths is probably the reason you could only get into a second rate program witch require less or no maths XD
    Are you slightly mental? Well, ignore the 'slightly' part. "[F]ive super elite universities"? Have you had a ranking table for breakfast this morning? Who cares? Seriously, who cares in the academic sector? SOAS graduates are doing very well and they're highly sought of in areas SOAS specialises in. It's a well-known pre-requisite for e.g. securing economic analyst positions in international organisations - and everywhere where economics knowledge is needed, not only quantitative knowledge. The thing is, you don't want to or cannot understand that. There are reasons why SOAS keeps resisting UCL's urge to 'buy' them.



    (Original post by drive like june)
    Oh and by the way, there are other skills worthwhile having other than mathematical aptitude... like correct spelling and grammar. "XD"
    Too bad we've never consciously met. I would have liked you.
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    I think Tarutaru might as well go ahead and define for all of us, or perhaps write an essay (or maybe book? publish several journals) on what the term economics really means, embodies, and should encompass.

    Or alternatively, provide a couple of history books; prepare a Thesis. Maybe start a masters degree on " all about economics and its deeper complexities/intricacies."

    If you are confident that the way SOAS is teaching economics is lacking and that the course is not sufficiently rigorous, I suggest you bring this up to the head of department at SOAS. You might as well since you feel so strongly about the subject. Given your expertise, MAYBE, you could even teach your own courses.

    What's the point of higher education if in order to feel better about yourself you have to go online and bring other people down? That seems rather juvenile no? If you wanted people to pat you in the back for being at UCL with an arguably better program, you should go talk to your family and your friends--that's why they exist. If you don't like how other people are different than you, you should go hang out with people who think exactly like you. Yet again, that's why you have friends. Or am I assuming too much? If UCL is so much better, why are you at SOAS, or are you sadistically and uncontrollably attracted to SOAS.

    If this thread represents what you are paying tuition for I think you are wasting your money. Nonetheless, congratulations for being an UCL student, I never for a second questioned your overachieving abilities at mathematics or economics for that matter.

    Here, have a lollipop. Good for you!:borat:


    -Shanna
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    OP was blatantly not invited any of the cool SOAS parties. :grumble: I hate to say BITTER but I just did......
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    Just looking at this thread, I had to laugh at this post:

    Look at the textbooks you use, they are for A-Levels Economics! You guys are using A-Level Economics maths textbook for a Msc Economics!

    Chiang, A. C. and K. Wainwright (2005) Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics, Forth Edition. McGraw-Hill.

    Thomas, R. L. (1999) Using Mathematics in Economics, Second Edition. Addison-Wesley.

    Jacques, I. (2009) Mathematics for Economics and Business, 6th Edition, Prentice Hall.


    And compare what is used at UCL:

    (SB) Simon, C.P. and L. Blume (1994): Mathematics for Economists, New York:
    Norton.

    • (MWG) Mas-Colell, A., M.D. Whinston, and J.R. Green (1995): Microeconomic
    Theory, Oxford University Press. (Mathematical Appendix)
    • (PR) Pemberton, M. and N. Rau (2006): Mathematics for Economists: An Introductory
    Textbook, Manchester University Press.
    • Wickens, M. (2008): Macroeconomic Theory: A Dynamic General Equilibrium Approach,
    Princeton University Press. (Mathematical Appendix)
    The

    A soas idiot like you would never have a chance to to look at these textbooks, which are the most advanced maths textbook.

    Yes, they are not very different XD XD because a SOAs idiot is lacking the basic intelligence to understand maths XD
    Tarutaru is obviously not familiar with these maths books and is banking on the fact that most of the people reading this are just going to assume what he says is right.

    The first book that he has listed as an "A-level" text book, Chiang and Wainwright, is the 'gold standard' book of Mathematics for Economists. This is very comprehensive and goes from undergraduate to MSc level mathematics. The best two books are Chiang and Wainwright, and Simon and Blume.

    Chiang and Wainwright is definitely not an A-level text book.

    But then the part where he is claiming
    A soas idiot like you would never have a chance to to look at these textbooks, which are the most advanced maths textbook.
    he lists the Pemberton and Rau book.

    Now I am not knocking Pemberton and Rau, which is a really effective introductory book for the new economics student and it is very well written by two UCL professors, which is why UCL uses it. But lets be honest "the most advanced maths textbook"...? You have to go two-thirds of the way through that book before you get to how to do basic integration. That is a book for A level students who want to study economics, to convert A level type knowledge into the stuff you need for undergrad economics.

    I don't doubt that UCL has a strong rigorous mathematical curriculum, but Tarutaru seems pretty ignorant when it comes to the content of these maths books. If SOAS uses Chiang and Wainwright for its MSc Economics then that's a rigorous enough core text. I would expect most universities use one of Chiang and Wainwright or Simon and Blume.

    From Tarutaru's stilted use of English it is obvious he is an overseas student. I think its a big thing on the internet for overseas students who get the opportunity to study in the mighty realm of Her Majesty the Queen, to argue with each other about which of these colonial subjects have studied at the best institution of the imperial power, so Tarutaru has probably disappeared onto some other forum now to tell everybody that he went to UCL and so all the other colonials should bow down and worship him. But when he comes on TSR which is predominantly full of English students who are better informed, he is on to a loser.
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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    Just looking at this thread, I had to laugh at this post:



    Tarutaru is obviously not familiar with these maths books and is banking on the fact that most of the people reading this are just going to assume what he says is right.

    The first book that he has listed as an "A-level" text book, Chiang and Wainwright, is the 'gold standard' book of Mathematics for Economists. This is very comprehensive and goes from undergraduate to MSc level mathematics. The best two books are Chiang and Wainwright, and Simon and Blume.

    Chiang and Wainwright is definitely not an A-level text book.

    But then the part where he is claiming
    he lists the Pemberton and Rau book.

    Now I am not knocking Pemberton and Rau, which is a really effective introductory book for the new economics student and it is very well written by two UCL professors, which is why UCL uses it. But lets be honest "the most advanced maths textbook"...? You have to go two-thirds of the way through that book before you get to how to do basic integration. That is a book for A level students who want to study economics, to convert A level type knowledge into the stuff you need for undergrad economics.

    I don't doubt that UCL has a strong rigorous mathematical curriculum, but Tarutaru seems pretty ignorant when it comes to the content of these maths books. If SOAS uses Chiang and Wainwright for its MSc Economics then that's a rigorous enough core text. I would expect most universities use one of Chiang and Wainwright or Simon and Blume.

    From Tarutaru's stilted use of English it is obvious he is an overseas student. I think its a big thing on the internet for overseas students who get the opportunity to study in the mighty realm of Her Majesty the Queen, to argue with each other about which of these colonial subjects have studied at the best institution of the imperial power, so Tarutaru has probably disappeared onto some other forum now to tell everybody that he went to UCL and so all the other colonials should bow down and worship him. But when he comes on TSR which is predominantly full of English students who are better informed, he is on to a loser.

    This post is so full of ****** win. :adore:
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    Fok you, I'm going there later this year.
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    Wow the guy who started this thread actually made me want to go to SOAS even more(even though I applied for International Politics).I mean, he really came to the SOAS forum to complain about students at SOAS library(like they are no slackers at UCL Library)...and he doesn't consider himself a judgemental idiot..

    I'm glad not to go to UCL if it has students like him, even though I don't want to judge en entire university based on one single student.

    p.s.
    ehmmm UCL Economics..maybe, but just maybe he is a LSE reject :P

    People choosing SOAS for this subject probably want an education not so western oriented and are not necessarily LSE/UCL rejects...
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    I actually just stumbled upon this thread and felt compelled to sign up, just so I could reply to this nonsense about the SOAS economics department. I hold a BSc and MSc from SOAS in economics.

    The point I think all (or at least, most) of you are missing out on is the true nature of the department itself. You should know before starting a degree at SOAS, that it won't be your typical LSE/UCL experience. As it states on the department website, a special feature of the Department is the orientation to Political Economy and heterodox approaches to Economics. Keeping this in mind, it would be foolish to compare SOAS with LSE/UCL, which are completely different in nature. Emphasis on completely. If you want to spend your undergraduate/postgraduate years calculating marginal utilities and deriving demand/supply functions, and on top of that, believe what you are doing is economics, then feel free to go to LSE/UCL. The education you receive at SOAS is 'slightly' more genuine, enabling you to divulge in the real political economy, i.e. what 'economics' once used to be, before being stripped bare of all realism. For all those who doubt it, the econometrics courses for undergraduate and postgraduate students are indeed sufficiently rigorous to provide you with a solid understanding of quantitative economics, which will land you a job wherever you want, providing you get a good degree. My main readings for my MSc where

    Gujarati D N and Porter D C (2009) Basic Econometrics, 5th edition, McGraw-Hill, International Edition ISBN 978-007-127625-2.

    Asteriou, D and S G Hall (2007) Applied Econometrics A Modern Approach, Revised edition, Palgrave Macmillan, ISBN 978-0-230-50640-4

    which are of the same standard as any other leading institution. The notes posted below for the pre-sessional quantitative methods course are primarily for students without a solid foundation in econometrics (i.e. those who may have a joint BSc degree in economics with e.g. history). It is a requirement to pass the pre-sessional entry exam before starting the MSc, and most students gain grades of 90% and higher.

    For those criticizing SOAS staff, most of the academics in the economics department are at the forefront of their field of expertise. You mention publications in 'crappy' journals, but have you ever bothered to read any of the papers? I doubt it.

    So for those of you who have been accepted to SOAS - congratulations, I know you will enjoy it. To those who are thinking of applying there, I urge you to, and good luck.

    PEACE x
 
 
 
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