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    (Original post by Organ)
    What is the long-term prospects? Loads of ST7s or the creation of a sub consultant grade?

    Gov. could just spend some more money and bring our number of doctors up to the euro level
    pushed out the top of the training scheme and forced to take a Staff grade or Associate Specialist job despite having a CCST...

    once a tolerable level of consultants are in place it's cheaper to provide a 'specialist delivered service' with None Consultant Career Grade Doctors ...
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    as a Foundation Doctor you couldn't because you cannot practice outside your approved posts ...

    ST/ CT doctors would end up doing locums probably
    Ya I realise you can't work without supervision but I wondered whether they might give you a heavier schedule (within your approved post) if you had opted out - so your "normal" rota being more like the old-school all-work-no-play ones
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    (Original post by Chwirkytheappleboy)
    Ya I realise you can't work without supervision but I wondered whether they might give you a heavier schedule (within your approved post) if you had opted out - so your "normal" rota being more like the old-school all-work-no-play ones
    No, even opted out you would need to be New Deal compliant. What's more, no rota should be made with a recurring gap for someone to 'opt out' and fill.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    as a Foundation Doctor you couldn't because you cannot practice outside your approved posts ...

    ST/ CT doctors would end up doing locums probably
    As an F2 you can practice 'outside your approved post'

    The only real reason to opt out is to do extra locums
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    (Original post by Daveo)
    As an F2 you can practice 'outside your approved post'

    The only real reason to opt out is to do extra locums

    F 2 doctors cannot practice outside approved posts

    http://www.gmc-uk.org/doctors/before...e_settings.asp


    "Doctors who want the requirement to work within an approved practice setting lifted will need to provide the GMC with confirmation that they have satisfactorily completed 12 months practice in such a setting. This can be done in two ways:

    the Foundation Achievement of Competency Document (FACD), if they are based in the Foundation Programme
    a report by their supervising consultant, if they are not in the programme.
    "


    http://www.gmc-uk.org/doctors/regist...aps_p2.asp?p=1

    "To be released from the requirement to work in an approved practice setting you must have:

    Completed 12 months' UK experience in Foundation Year 2 within the last three years and have obtained a certificate of satisfactory completion of the second year of the Foundation Programme; Foundation Achievement of Competency Document (FACD) "


    http://www.gmc-uk.org/doctors/regist..._fr_p2.asp?p=1

    "For your first 12 months of full registration with a licence to practise you will be required to work within an approved practice setting. This means that you will only be able to work in settings that have been approved by the General Medical Council as having sufficiently supportive and quality assured systems aimed at improving quality in place"
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    I think you might be talking at cross purposes here: an approved practice setting presumably means any F2 or equivalent job with appropriate supervision, whereas your approved post implies the specific job you're attached to, and not any others.
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    Radiology. The dark rooms and lack of sunlight wreak havoc on the Vit D synthesis. Compressed vertebrae for everyone :yeah:
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    (Original post by ThisLittlePiggy)
    Radiology. The dark rooms and lack of sunlight wreak havoc on the Vit D synthesis. Compressed vertebrae for everyone :yeah:
    :mad:
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    F 2 doctors cannot practice outside approved posts

    http://www.gmc-uk.org/doctors/before...e_settings.asp


    "Doctors who want the requirement to work within an approved practice setting lifted will need to provide the GMC with confirmation that they have satisfactorily completed 12 months practice in such a setting. This can be done in two ways:

    the Foundation Achievement of Competency Document (FACD), if they are based in the Foundation Programme
    a report by their supervising consultant, if they are not in the programme.
    "


    http://www.gmc-uk.org/doctors/regist...aps_p2.asp?p=1

    "To be released from the requirement to work in an approved practice setting you must have:

    Completed 12 months' UK experience in Foundation Year 2 within the last three years and have obtained a certificate of satisfactory completion of the second year of the Foundation Programme; Foundation Achievement of Competency Document (FACD) "


    http://www.gmc-uk.org/doctors/regist..._fr_p2.asp?p=1

    "For your first 12 months of full registration with a licence to practise you will be required to work within an approved practice setting. This means that you will only be able to work in settings that have been approved by the General Medical Council as having sufficiently supportive and quality assured systems aimed at improving quality in place"
    Sorry I forgot you know everything about everything!

    An approved practice setting is different and not what you said. The documents linked to state that all UK PCTs are automatically granted as approved practice settings for foundation training.

    You implied that you cannot work outside of the post you are employed in which isn't true. You can do SHO level locums in other posts.

    Also, many people go abroad to do their F2 year in posts which don't have to be pre-approved.
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    A geneticist specialising in dwarfism?

    Or more seriously, GP
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    Just as a passing thought, do max fax potentials apply to medicine courses in open competition with 'regular' applicants?
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    (Original post by Beska)
    Just as a passing thought, do max fax potentials apply to medicine courses in open competition with 'regular' applicants?
    Sometimes, but there are procedures for direct entry into clinical years for example
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    (Original post by Daveo)
    Sometimes, but there are procedures for direct entry into clinical years for example
    Seems like a really long-winded way of doing it. Universities that offer both medicine and dentistry should do some kind of joint programme.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    Seems like a really long-winded way of doing it. Universities that offer both medicine and dentistry should do some kind of joint programme.
    The problem is that you would still require a full four years of clinical dentistry, three years of clinical medicine and some pre-clinical content. That's a lot of commitment from someone aged 18 with no real experience of either medicine, dentistry or maxfax.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    The problem is that you would still require a full four years of clinical dentistry, three years of clinical medicine and some pre-clinical content. That's a lot of commitment from someone aged 18 with no real experience of either medicine, dentistry or maxfax.
    That's very true, didn't think about it from that angle.

    It's a very peculiar specialty, not least because of the length of training. How common is studying medicine first before dentistry?
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    (Original post by Beska)
    That's very true, didn't think about it from that angle.

    It's a very peculiar specialty, not least because of the length of training. How common is studying medicine first before dentistry?
    Almost all do dentistry first in my experience
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    (Original post by Beska)
    How common is studying medicine first before dentistry?
    Extremely unusual. Most will be dentists who have worked up to MaxFax SHO or Reg posts before applying to medicine.
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    I know 2 people on my course in my year who are dentists - so they have another 5 years of uni left! No idea why they didn't even go to a GEM uni :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Daveo)
    :mad:
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    (Original post by Beska)
    That's very true, didn't think about it from that angle.

    It's a very peculiar specialty, not least because of the length of training. How common is studying medicine first before dentistry?
    I chatted to a medic fifth year at sheff at the open day who was going to KCL to do dentistry.
 
 
 
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