Why do you read fiction? Watch

Unwavering
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#61
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#61
I find reading books with only words really boring so I don't read novels, but I do read comics/manga sometimes. I prefer visual novels because I have a really crap imagination.
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NaturalDisaster
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#62
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#62
(Original post by -honeybee-)
This springs to mind...

'The best moments in reading are when you come across something - a thought, a feeling, a way of looking at things - which you had thought special and particular to you. And now, here it is, set down by someone else, a person you have never met, someone even who is long dead. And it is as if a hand has come out, and taken yours'.
Good old History Boys. Great play/film. One of the best, in fact.

Basically, fiction is awesome because it shows you what you can do with words. It's another way of exploring human emotions, like art or music. And nothing anybody can say will convince me that either music or fiction is ever useless.
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oodlesofpoodles
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#63
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#63
Escapism, you get to experience places and situations that you'd never be able to in real life. There's also an element of entertainment of course.
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S_123
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#64
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#64
It's fun It opens your mind to new theories, you can be a part of a different world, books are interesting, you're 'meeting' characters that you may never meet in real life. It's just great isn't it? Man can't wait until these exams are over so I can get down to some hardcore fiction!
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JIRAIYA-ERO-SENNIN
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#65
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(Original post by Kareir)
So that's fact, is it? It's fiction. It's just fiction with a purpose. Obviously books like twilight shouldn't even be considered books, but fiction is certainly not as redundant as you make out.

_Kar.

PS: Have you read a factual book on quantum mechanics? Because I've read MUCH more convincing fiction.
:facepalm: you've just demonstrated how you have a fundamental misunderstanding of the difference between fiction and non-fiction. A work of Non-fiction does not necessarily have to be factual, the work presents a theory or an explanation as being factual; that is why it is called non-fiction rather than fact. i did not claim that philosophical thought experiments were facts: but they are still categorized as non-fiction.
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BlueJoker
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#66
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#66
(Original post by JIRAIYA-ERO-SENNIN)
i dislike fiction because when i read a book i expect to be enlightened; i want to learn facts, ideas, theories that explain the world around me and how i can live within it. works of fiction cannot offer me that.
What about fictions set during a historical time period, which I find can teach me more about history than a history textbook.

For example, Malka taught me more about the Krakow Ghetto than any textbook has.
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Kalliope
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#67
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#67
*splutters* Because it's just - just - just... amazing!
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JIRAIYA-ERO-SENNIN
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#68
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#68
(Original post by BlueJoker)
What about fictions set during a historical time period, which I find can teach me more about history than a history textbook.

For example, Malka taught me more about the Krakow Ghetto than any textbook has.
I've addressed this specific objection a number of times now. if you think that the fictional work that you've read has taught you more (whatever lesson that may be) about a historical event, then fine. But when i want to learn about something when I'm reading I'm looking for theories and logically reasoned arguments; not fictional characters in their fictional universe.
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BlueJoker
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#69
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(Original post by JIRAIYA-ERO-SENNIN)
I've addressed this specific objection a number of times now. if you think that the fictional work that you've read has taught you more (whatever lesson that may be) about a historical event, then fine. But when i want to learn about something when I'm reading I'm looking for theories and logically reasoned arguments; not fictional characters in their fictional universe.
I don't think Krakow Ghetto was a fictional universe. Non-fiction books can only look at a very basic level of knowledge, the sheer facts. But facts themselves aren't always knowledge.

I have nothing against people not wanting to read fiction, but you cannot suggest that non-fiction is more useful than fiction in all circumstances.
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JIRAIYA-ERO-SENNIN
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#70
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(Original post by BlueJoker)
I don't think Krakow Ghetto was a fictional universe. Non-fiction books can only look at a very basic level of knowledge, the sheer facts. But facts themselves aren't always knowledge.

I have nothing against people not wanting to read fiction, but you cannot suggest that non-fiction is more useful than fiction in all circumstances.
if i was a holocaust denier i would say so

you seem to be misrepresenting non-fiction. non-fiction works do not have to contain facts, in fact there are many works which contain untruths. the purpose of non-fiction is to present theories, arguments, facts; this is not a very basic level of knowledge (whatever that means) if you read the works of great philosophers like Descartes and John Stuart Mill you wouldn't call what they wrote 'basic'. i will reiterate my position once more: i don't like fiction because it bores me and when i read stuff i want to learn about theories, arguments and facts which non-fiction offers in abundance.
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BlueJoker
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#71
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(Original post by JIRAIYA-ERO-SENNIN)
if i was a holocaust denier i would say so
0.o

I don't see the point your making here, unless you believe Holocaust deniers have a valid point.

you seem to be misrepresenting non-fiction. non-fiction works do not have to
contain facts, in fact there are many works which contain untruths. the purpose of non-fiction is to present theories, arguments, facts; this is not a very basic level of knowledge (whatever that means) if you read the works of great philosophers like Descartes and John Stuart Mill you wouldn't call what they wrote 'basic'. i will reiterate my position once more: i don't like fiction because it bores me and when i read stuff i want to learn about theories, arguments and facts which non-fiction offers in abundance.
What about Animal Farm or 1984 by George Orwell? They are both firmly in the "fiction" section of my local and college library, but they both present political theories and arguements. His book Down and Out in Paris and London is also sometimes classed under fiction, although I'll be honest and say that much of it is an account of his journeys, though certainly some is made up.
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Coup-d-Etat
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#72
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#72
To escape the dreariness and drudgery of my day to day life?...:moon:
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JIRAIYA-ERO-SENNIN
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#73
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#73
(Original post by BlueJoker)
0.o

I don't see the point your making here, unless you believe Holocaust deniers have a valid point.

you seem to be misrepresenting non-fiction. non-fiction works do not have to

What about Animal Farm or 1984 by George Orwell? They are both firmly in the "fiction" section of my local and college library, but they both present political theories and arguements. His book Down and Out in Paris and London is also sometimes classed under fiction, although I'll be honest and say that much of it is an account of his journeys, though certainly some is made up.
i have not disputed whether fictional works like Animal Farm have elements of political ideas within them; that is obviously the case. As i have stated a number of times on this thread, if i wanted to learn about something be it a political idea, some philosophy, history or science i would consult the relevant non-fictional book of that issue. the non-fictional work will directly engage with that matter in a reasoned way and teach me the ins and outs of that issue in a way that a fictional work struggles to do. that's why i like non-fiction over fiction.
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BlueJoker
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#74
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(Original post by JIRAIYA-ERO-SENNIN)
i have not disputed whether fictional works like Animal Farm have elements of political ideas within them; that is obviously the case. As i have stated a number of times on this thread, if i wanted to learn about something be it a political idea, some philosophy, history or science i would consult the relevant non-fictional book of that issue. the non-fictional work will directly engage with that matter in a reasoned way and teach me the ins and outs of that issue in a way that a fictional work struggles to do. that's why i like non-fiction over fiction.
Animal Farm doesn't have elements of political ideas in it. It *is* a political opinion against the dangers of communism and what is appealing about communism. The guise of it being animals and is being shrunk down onto a farm is used to simplify these ideas. As an 11 year old, I would not have been able to read a politics book about communism, no matter how valid it is. But as it transpired, by the age of 12 I was quite capeable of describing what communism was and why it was flawed - and Animal Farm is not a children's book!
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JIRAIYA-ERO-SENNIN
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#75
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(Original post by BlueJoker)
Animal Farm doesn't have elements of political ideas in it. It *is* a political opinion against the dangers of communism and what is appealing about communism. The guise of it being animals and is being shrunk down onto a farm is used to simplify these ideas. As an 11 year old, I would not have been able to read a politics book about communism, no matter how valid it is. But as it transpired, by the age of 12 I was quite capeable of describing what communism was and why it was flawed - and Animal Farm is not a children's book!
that's perfectly fine by me. And i never asserted that Animal Farm is a children's book; i don't live in a cave you know. when i was that age if i wanted to learn something in a really engaging way i often watched documentaries and they'd perfectly explain to the issues at hand. Generally, non-fiction books are better at explaining factual or theoretical subject matter than fiction; that is what non-fiction is meant to do, and that is why i like it.
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BlueJoker
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#76
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(Original post by JIRAIYA-ERO-SENNIN)
that's perfectly fine by me. And i never asserted that Animal Farm is a children's book; i don't live in a cave you know. when i was that age if i wanted to learn something in a really engaging way i often watched documentaries and they'd perfectly explain to the issues at hand. Generally, non-fiction books is better at explaining factual or theoretical subject matter than fiction; that is what non-fiction is meant to do, and that is why i like it.
That's fine in itself, but I think it's unwise to disregard all works of fiction as "boring" or less worthy than non-fiction. I think it's always best to read a mixture; that stimulates the brain far more than just sticking with one thing. Complex social issues cannot always be explained without the emotion of fiction (and emotion within a subject has to be understood too) and theories cannot always be explained best through fiction.
It's never ever smart to be closed minded, especially when it comes to books.
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-honeybee-
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#77
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#77
(Original post by JIRAIYA-ERO-SENNIN)
that's perfectly fine by me. And i never asserted that Animal Farm is a children's book; i don't live in a cave you know. when i was that age if i wanted to learn something in a really engaging way i often watched documentaries and they'd perfectly explain to the issues at hand. Generally, non-fiction books are better at explaining factual or theoretical subject matter than fiction; that is what non-fiction is meant to do, and that is why i like it.
I think the idea is that fiction offers an alternative viewpoint on non-fiction matters. Reading forces you to consider your opinions and the opinions of others. It also expands horizons, a lot of people wouldn't think to watch documentaries (which are often very superficial) or do in depth research on unfamiliar topics. Fiction can portray the ways in which non-fiction matters come about.
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JIRAIYA-ERO-SENNIN
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#78
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(Original post by BlueJoker)
That's fine in itself, but I think it's unwise to disregard all works of fiction as "boring" or less worthy than non-fiction. I think it's always best to read a mixture; that stimulates the brain far more than just sticking with one thing. Complex social issues cannot always be explained without the emotion of fiction (and emotion within a subject has to be understood too) and theories cannot always be explained best through fiction.
It's never ever smart to be closed minded, especially when it comes to books.
there is nothing closed minded about what i said. I've explained to you why i find fiction boring and why i prefer non-fiction; i have reached my judgment through experience not through prejudice; i gave you rational explanations that is a sign of open-mindedness more than anything else.
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BlueJoker
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#79
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(Original post by JIRAIYA-ERO-SENNIN)
there is nothing closed minded about what i said. I've explained to you why i find fiction boring and why i prefer non-fiction; i have reached my judgment through experience not through prejudice; i gave you rational explanations that is a sign of open-mindedness more than anything else.
Except that you put ALL fiction under the label of boring and less worthy than non-fiction, when you yourself have admitted that certain fictions can show a very developed insight to theories and social issues. :rolleyes: You only said "generally" in your last post.
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JIRAIYA-ERO-SENNIN
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#80
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(Original post by BlueJoker)
Except that you put ALL fiction under the label of boring and less worthy than non-fiction, when you yourself have admitted that certain fictions can show a very developed insight to theories and social issues. :rolleyes: You only said "generally" in your last post.
yes, I've found all the works of fiction that I've ever read to be boring; that is a subjective judgment which I'm entitled to make. secondly, whether i said it was 'less worthy' is an assessment that you have projected onto to my statements. I've also alluded to the fact that fictional works have elements of non-fictional material within them; that in no way undermines the validity of my preference for non-fictional works. each of my statements addresses this issue in general terms; i haven't read every book in the world so i reach a judgment based on the books that i have read, like any normal person. the crux of my belief is still the same: i want factual and theoretical material; non-fiction is better at providing that.
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