Oxford Law University Watch

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Zacho
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(Original post by d.luffy)
Yes thanks english law.

I don't know because I don't live in UK yet.
Yeah, thats fine. As i said you wouldn't be expected to know. I just thought i would let you know so that you have an idea of where you can study to be qualified in England and Wales.

I hope i didn't come across as an arse.
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d.luffy
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(Original post by Zacho)
Yeah, thats fine. As i said you wouldn't be expected to know. I just thought i would let you know so that you have an idea of where you can study to be qualified in England and Wales.

I hope i didn't come across as an arse.
Lol nah its helpful !!!
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jacketpotato
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(Original post by d.luffy)
Hey, thanks but no I do not want to do a conversion, and I also do not want to do law in scottland, my only choices are UK or USA. I wouldn't go for another country.

And no I am not an international student but I have a swiss passport the only thing is I left switzerland 5 years ago due this I got poor education in Libya my home country.

To be honest I am still going to try an entry in Cambridge and I am also going to email UCL and USL to get answers...etc so at least when I apply they know who I am.
I read today in an alumni magazine from my old Cambridge college (Am only 22 and am getting alumni magazines, gawd I feel old) that the average Cambridge student has 2.5 A* grades at A-level and that the number of new students in my college (fairly large one for law) with 'only' A*AA was 5%.

If you want to get into Oxford or Cambridge, this is the academic standard you are competing with. I don't want to put a dampener on your ideas, just don't forget that there are other outstanding universities in the UK and US.

Cardiff is pretty good actually. Its not Oxford or Cambridge but it puts out good lawyers and standards are high, don't write places like it off.
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d.luffy
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(Original post by jacketpotato)
I read today in an alumni magazine from my old Cambridge college (Am only 22 and am getting alumni magazines, gawd I feel old) that the average Cambridge student has 2.5 A* grades at A-level and that the number of new students in my college (fairly large one for law) with 'only' A*AA was 5%.

If you want to get into Oxford or Cambridge, this is the academic standard you are competing with. I don't want to put a dampener on your ideas, just don't forget that there are other outstanding universities in the UK and US.

Cardiff is pretty good actually. Its not Oxford or Cambridge but it puts out good lawyers and standards are high, don't write places like it off.
Hahaha, yeah they told me thats what they require and i know its pretty high but i can manage to get A* in one subject and the rest A and if somehow i can put out a deal to redo my igcse to get higher scores while i am studying with either oxford or cambridge that would be good
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What about Queen's University in Belfast? do they study Irish law? It's an excellent university and part of the Russell group.
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jacketpotato
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(Original post by d.luffy)
Hahaha, yeah they told me thats what they require and i know its pretty high but i can manage to get A* in one subject and the rest A and if somehow i can put out a deal to redo my igcse to get higher scores while i am studying with either oxford or cambridge that would be good
I don't think you would have time to retake your GCSEs during term-time at Oxford or Cambridge and they wouldn't want you to focus on anything apart from your university studies.
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d.luffy
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(Original post by jacketpotato)
I don't think you would have time to retake your GCSEs during term-time at Oxford or Cambridge and they wouldn't want you to focus on anything apart from your university studies.
Yeah I see what you mean, but telling them this it may show how dedicated I am to get in, and they could at least take me into consideration, the bad part is that you can only choose between oxford or Cambridge... But I also decided to put UCL and LSE into consideration since they are very good law university, and the entrance doesn't seem that competitive like Oxford or Cambridge
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jacketpotato
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(Original post by d.luffy)
Yeah I see what you mean, but telling them this it may show how dedicated I am to get in, and they could at least take me into consideration, the bad part is that you can only choose between oxford or Cambridge... But I also decided to put UCL and LSE into consideration since they are very good law university, and the entrance doesn't seem that competitive like Oxford or Cambridge
I think this is a very bad idea. Oxford and Cambridge are both very clear that you need to be focused on your course. For example, undergraduates are not allowed to do paid work during term time (though they can't enforce this). Unless you are good enough to get A*A*A* without doing that much work, it would be difficult for you to re-sit an entire set of GCSEs during term.

Entry to LSE and UCL is very competitive, they are top unis. AAA minimum or forget it!
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(Original post by d.luffy)
Yeah I see what you mean, but telling them this it may show how dedicated I am to get in, and they could at least take me into consideration, the bad part is that you can only choose between oxford or Cambridge... But I also decided to put UCL and LSE into consideration since they are very good law university, and the entrance doesn't seem that competitive like Oxford or Cambridge
Set your sights a little lower, UCL and LSE are still crazily competitive.
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Zacho
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(Original post by d.luffy)
Yeah I see what you mean, but telling them this it may show how dedicated I am to get in, and they could at least take me into consideration, the bad part is that you can only choose between oxford or Cambridge... But I also decided to put UCL and LSE into consideration since they are very good law university, and the entrance doesn't seem that competitive like Oxford or Cambridge
This is just my input so feel free to disregard it.

I think you should apply to a university with less strict requirements as well. By all means apply to Oxford and see if they will take you with three A's and your GCSE's (unlikely in my opinion if not impossible). Also, from what the other poster said about Cambridge, it seems you need A*A*A these days to get in.

However, look at other universities as well as the grade requirements for all the top uni's for law are three A's. They are all good universities. Don't think it is Oxbridge or nothing.

UCL and LSE are very competitive too, especially for law. Look at some of the others in the top 30 category just in case Oxbridge reject you.

However, I could be wrong as i chose my uni 4 years ago and didn't apply to any of the ones you have mentioned.
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d.luffy
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(Original post by jacketpotato)
I think this is a very bad idea. Oxford and Cambridge are both very clear that you need to be focused on your course. For example, undergraduates are not allowed to do paid work during term time (though they can't enforce this). Unless you are good enough to get A*A*A* without doing that much work, it would be difficult for you to re-sit an entire set of GCSEs during term.

Entry to LSE and UCL is very competitive, they are top unis. AAA minimum or forget it!
Thats true, but it is tough to get 3 A*s ... if I get those results I would apply for Harvard.....

The thing is my goal is to go to a university not more then top 10 this is my main aim. And this looks tough to be honest.

I still haven't started my A levels, there may be a chance that I get 3 A*s as the curve of Libya is the easiest one in the whole arab country. I can prepare myself with tutors in switzwerland to get high education standards and then write my exam in Libya. so there would be more chances for me to achieve A*s

(Original post by bramz19)
Set your sights a little lower, UCL and LSE are still crazily competitive.
Damm seems like Law nowadays are very tough to get in.

(Original post by Zacho)
This is just my input so feel free to disregard it.

I think you should apply to a university with less strict requirements as well. By all means apply to Oxford and see if they will take you with three A's and your GCSE's (unlikely in my opinion if not impossible). Also, from what the other poster said about Cambridge, it seems you need A*A*A these days to get in.

However, look at other universities as well as the grade requirements for all the top uni's for law are three A's. They are all good universities. Don't think it is Oxbridge or nothing.

UCL and LSE are very competitive too, especially for law. Look at some of the others in the top 30 category just in case Oxbridge reject you.

However, I could be wrong as i chose my uni 4 years ago and didn't apply to any of the ones you have mentioned.
Thats what I have to do anyways, I will apply to 3 good universities and 2 with low requirements, and yes ill have to take a shot with oxford or cambridge, and I kinda felt it like way, like it is oxbridge or nothing, but at the same time I have no clue which universities are very good but in low position.
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AdamTJ
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(Original post by d.luffy)
Thats true, but it is tough to get 3 A*s ... if I get those results I would apply for Harvard.....
I'm almost certain you couldn't do a law degree at undergraduate level there. Just a warning. As for your admission prospects, most of us aren't qualified to talk about this in any great depth but even with 3A*s, I assume it would be tough. You'd probably also have to take the SATs.


(Original post by d.luffy)
Damm seems like Law nowadays are very tough to get in.
Law has always been one of the most competitive courses. It's renowned for this and one of the reasons it's still such a prestigious degree.


(Original post by d.luffy)
Thats what I have to do anyways, I will apply to 3 good universities and 2 with low requirements, and yes ill have to take a shot with oxford or cambridge, and I kinda felt it like way, like it is oxbridge or nothing, but at the same time I have no clue which universities are very good but in low position.
I would really suggest you go and do some of your own research about the UK university system, and what a law degree actually entails. It's very good that you're motivated and that you aspire to do what is, in my opinion, one of the more difficult degrees out there, but I think you need to realise what you're letting yourself in for before you can make any sound decisions about your future.

A law degree is pretty intensive, particularly at Oxbridge. Your comments about attempting to do GCSEs "whilst" doing a degree slightly worry me, because it leads me to believe you don't really understand how tough it can be. This is not to say that a law degree is by any means "impossible", but there are periods where intensive work will be required if you are to do well.

Another problem is that you can't "have your cake and eat it". A university with lower admissions standards is inevitably going to be of a slightly lower calibre. However, this is by no means the end of the story. There are plenty of good universities out there that are slightly less competitive. Examples might be:

Sussex,
Kent,
Newcastle (probably offer 3As but may well let you in with lower)
Cardiff (ditto)
Liverpool

Just have a look around, if you have any inquiries you can come back on here and I'm sure people would be very happy to help you out.

I'm not sure if this has been brought up- but also be aware that some universities require you to take a legal aptitude test called the LNAT as part of the admissions process. This comprises of two sections: verbal reasoning and an essay. This is also pretty difficult itself! Unfortunately, applying for law is no walk in the park.
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bramz19
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(Original post by d.luffy)
Damm seems like Law nowadays are very tough to get in.
I don't think Law has ever been easy to get in for, it's always been one of the most competitive courses. Just to put it into perspective, I got 11A*s at GCSE, 5 As at AS Level, with 100% in two of my subjects, and a okay-ish score of 25/42 on the LNAT (where the national average was 17.7) and I got rejected from Oxford for Law, although admittedly I chose my college and course quite badly and I mucked up my interview. While there are people with lower grades which get in, I think this just shows how hard it really is. So while you should definitely give it a go, you should make your other choices wisely in case Oxford doesn't work out.
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d.luffy
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(Original post by AdamTJ)
I'm almost certain you couldn't do a law degree at undergraduate level there. Just a warning. As for your admission prospects, most of us aren't qualified to talk about this in any great depth but even with 3A*s, I assume it would be tough. You'd probably also have to take the SATs.




Law has always been one of the most competitive courses. It's renowned for this and one of the reasons it's still such a prestigious degree.




I would really suggest you go and do some of your own research about the UK university system, and what a law degree actually entails. It's very good that you're motivated and that you aspire to do what is, in my opinion, one of the more difficult degrees out there, but I think you need to realise what you're letting yourself in for before you can make any sound decisions about your future.

A law degree is pretty intensive, particularly at Oxbridge. Your comments about attempting to do GCSEs "whilst" doing a degree slightly worry me, because it leads me to believe you don't really understand how tough it can be. This is not to say that a law degree is by any means "impossible", but there are periods where intensive work will be required if you are to do well.

Another problem is that you can't "have your cake and eat it". A university with lower admissions standards is inevitably going to be of a slightly lower calibre. However, this is by no means the end of the story. There are plenty of good universities out there that are slightly less competitive. Examples might be:

Sussex,
Kent,
Newcastle (probably offer 3As but may well let you in with lower)
Cardiff (ditto)
Liverpool

Just have a look around, if you have any inquiries you can come back on here and I'm sure people would be very happy to help you out.

I'm not sure if this has been brought up- but also be aware that some universities require you to take a legal aptitude test called the LNAT as part of the admissions process. This comprises of two sections: verbal reasoning and an essay. This is also pretty difficult itself! Unfortunately, applying for law is no walk in the park.
Hey thanks for the helpful reply.

I don't see why people still say ''You can't do that'' or ''It's tough to do that'' I mean if I get accepted in one of the top universities like if somehow I manage to get in, ill just have to adapt myself as long as I am in one of the top universities I wouldn't expect any easy tasks otherwise they wouldn't be the ''top''.

I may take the SATS as additional at the same time I am taking my A levels, but don't forget that as I said above that my home country's curve is very low and achieving A* in A level wouldn't be as hard as in UK or any europeean country and by this I can use this chance.

It isn't a problem if it is tough, as long as I want to do it ill have to manage and do what I have to do to get in.

I heard it a couple of times that I need to decide carefully before getting into law because it doesn't seem what it seem, but all this just doesn't change my mind and motivation for doing what I want to do everything is tough, why always choose for easy things this way you'll never be what your dreams are, and yes I may lack knowledge of Law system in UK because I don't know anything about Law in UK and somehow I don't really want to look for it or what it entails, as I will uncover all this once I get there.

When I say about GCSES, how hard can it be if you have done it once and the knowledge that you have learned doesn't go, the only thing you will need to do is do past papers and revise, that is what I meant, and I am also not saying like doing 8 or 10 GCSES but only 3 or 2 to redo which this shouldn't be a problem, of course you will have days where you will need to complete very tough tasks but still don't see why you guys think that all these kind of comments would change my mind or even thing twice about it, as a matter of fact when you guys tell me this it gives me more motivation and to carefully analyse the steps and how I need to do it or what I shall do to get everything right...etc

I noticed that even low universities still require more or less the same scores as the top one, but this is not what I am looking for, I am looking as study wise, and if any of those low universities have got students who graduated and become someone known in UK or wherever as this is what gives a background.

About the LNAT I have already contacted the administrator and told him that there isn't any of this kind of examination in Libya, and he did approve it, he told me to send him the universities I will be applying in so he can send them an email confirming this. And LNAT is more of natural knowledge, yes you would need to revise but not much.



(Original post by bramz19)
I don't think Law has ever been easy to get in for, it's always been one of the most competitive courses. Just to put it into perspective, I got 11A*s at GCSE, 5 As at AS Level, with 100% in two of my subjects, and a okay-ish score of 25/42 on the LNAT (where the national average was 17.7) and I got rejected from Oxford for Law, although admittedly I chose my college and course quite badly and I mucked up my interview. While there are people with lower grades which get in, I think this just shows how hard it really is. So while you should definitely give it a go, you should make your other choices wisely in case Oxford doesn't work out.
Thats surprising as hell, I am sure they rejected you due to the lack of places they have. with you scores it is impossible to reject you, but the thing is all universities would like students with an extra curricular, like I play tennis and if I do well in these coming months I can put it in my personal statment with an official Libyan letter coming for the president of olympics there. This can help alot. sometimes they choose good students not excellent but they would have an extra something that can benefit them.

And which uni are you know?
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AdamTJ
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(Original post by d.luffy)
Hey thanks for the helpful reply.

I don't see why people still say ''You can't do that'' or ''It's tough to do that'' I mean if I get accepted in one of the top universities like if somehow I manage to get in, ill just have to adapt myself as long as I am in one of the top universities I wouldn't expect any easy tasks otherwise they wouldn't be the ''top''.
This is a very healthy attitude and we all wish you well, I'm sure. You just have to make sure you're realistic in your goals.


(Original post by d.luffy)
I heard it a couple of times that I need to decide carefully before getting into law because it doesn't seem what it seem, but all this just doesn't change my mind and motivation for doing what I want to do everything is tough, why always choose for easy things this way you'll never be what your dreams are, and yes I may lack knowledge of Law system in UK because I don't know anything about Law in UK and somehow I don't really want to look for it or what it entails, as I will uncover all this once I get there.
I'm not so much talking about boosting your knowledge of the law. You don't need to do this. It's more about the type of work you will be doing studying law, the amount of hours you will need to put in and the issues you will be grappling with. It can be pretty full-on.

(Original post by d.luffy)
When I say about GCSES, how hard can it be if you have done it once and the knowledge that you have learned doesn't go, the only thing you will need to do is do past papers and revise, that is what I meant, and I am also not saying like doing 8 or 10 GCSES but only 3 or 2 to redo which this shouldn't be a problem, of course you will have days where you will need to complete very tough tasks but still don't see why you guys think that all these kind of comments would change my mind or even thing twice about it, as a matter of fact when you guys tell me this it gives me more motivation and to carefully analyse the steps and how I need to do it or what I shall do to get everything right...etc
There are two problems I have with this. Firstly, it is utterly pointless. GCSEs are mainly used during the admissions process as a sort of secondary gauge of ability alongside A Levels. Doing GCSEs "after admission" would be a bit like opening the stable door after the horse has bolted. I don't really see how or why any university in their right mind would let you do it.

Secondly, a law degree is hard work. You will have lectures, tutorials and essays to write. You will be dealing with some quite complex concepts which may take a while to swallow. You will definitely not want to have the additional hindrance of re-taking exams which you should have really finished with when you were 16. This is even more true assuming that you will also want to have some kind of social life. If you can manage to juggle everything you're definitely a better person than me, because I don't think I'd have had either the inclination or stamina.


(Original post by d.luffy)
I noticed that even low universities still require more or less the same scores as the top one, but this is not what I am looking for, I am looking as study wise, and if any of those low universities have got students who graduated and become someone known in UK or wherever as this is what gives a background.
It may seem that many universities require 3As on the face of it, but that's not always the reality. Quite often, the less competitive universities are prepared to relax their "requirements" if you still have fairly good grades. In any case- the chance of you actually getting into one these places in the first place is much higher, particularly if your GCSEs not as strong as they could be.

There are plenty of success stories from less-heralded universities. Law firms in particular are casting the net wider these days (although of course this is heavily dependent on the firm). The most important thing is to excel when you're at a particular place. The correlation between employment and university calibre isn't completely straight-forward because there are so many factors which have to be taken into the equation. This is not to say that's it's not advantageous to go to a highly ranked school, but it is certainly no disaster going to somewhere else.

(Original post by d.luffy)
About the LNAT I have already contacted the administrator and told him that there isn't any of this kind of examination in Libya, and he did approve it, he told me to send him the universities I will be applying in so he can send them an email confirming this. And LNAT is more of natural knowledge, yes you would need to revise but not much.
To an extent you're right, it is a test of natural reasoning ability. Don't underestimate it though. It is worth putting in the hours of practice, so that you get to grips with the style of question. The test is also far from easy! Despite taking it twice (as I took a gap year and re-applied), I never felt entirely comfortable doing it at any stage. I rank both occasions as two of the more difficult exam experiences I have had (and trust me, I have done a lot of exams in the past 7 years or so).


(Original post by d.luffy)
Thats surprising as hell, I am sure they rejected you due to the lack of places they have. with you scores it is impossible to reject you, but the thing is all universities would like students with an extra curricular, like I play tennis and if I do well in these coming months I can put it in my personal statment with an official Libyan letter coming for the president of olympics there. This can help alot. sometimes they choose good students not excellent but they would have an extra something that can benefit them.

And which uni are you know?
You'd be surprised. It's much more common than you think. The interview at Oxbridge is often key, and if you fluff that, then you leave yourself with little chance. Obviously I'm not an admissions tutor, but I went through the applications palava twice and I can safely say I was always told the Oxbridge admissions tutors were much more interested in your academic "potential" than your extra-curriculars. Those are very much a periphery consideration (unless you're a world-class rower or something!).
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d.luffy
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(Original post by AdamTJ)
This is a very healthy attitude and we all wish you well, I'm sure. You just have to make sure you're realistic in your goals.
Thanks, I chose this path carefully before doing anything else, and I finally decided thats what I am going to do.




(Original post by AdamTJ)
I'm not so much talking about boosting your knowledge of the law. You don't need to do this. It's more about the type of work you will be doing studying law, the amount of hours you will need to put in and the issues you will be grappling with. It can be pretty full-on.
Yes but aren't going to learn that while your in a university? And yeah getting to know what you would do doesn't hurt much, but I don't know where to look anyways :P



(Original post by AdamTJ)
There are two problems I have with this. Firstly, it is utterly pointless. GCSEs are mainly used during the admissions process as a sort of secondary gauge of ability alongside A Levels. Doing GCSEs "after admission" would be a bit like opening the stable door after the horse has bolted. I don't really see how or why any university in their right mind would let you do it.

Secondly, a law degree is hard work. You will have lectures, tutorials and essays to write. You will be dealing with some quite complex concepts which may take a while to swallow. You will definitely not want to have the additional hindrance of re-taking exams which you should have really finished with when you were 16. This is even more true assuming that you will also want to have some kind of social life. If you can manage to juggle everything you're definitely a better person than me, because I don't think I'd have had either the inclination or stamina..
I totally understand you, and you have a good point about the university part, I wouldn't think they would let that happen, and kind of going back to what you did at 16 is kinda annoying when your already thinking about university...etc

Yes I don't expect less from university but somehow I will manage to divide my time carefully, since it is not possible for a university to give you so much work that they would permantley cut off you social life for 3 years.... there should be time where you could do what you want.


(Original post by AdamTJ)
It may seem that many universities require 3As on the face of it, but that's not always the reality. Quite often, the less competitive universities are prepared to relax their "requirements" if you still have fairly good grades. In any case- the chance of you actually getting into one these places in the first place is much higher, particularly if your GCSEs not as strong as they could be.

There are plenty of success stories from less-heralded universities. Law firms in particular are casting the net wider these days (although of course this is heavily dependent on the firm). The most important thing is to excel when you're at a particular place. The correlation between employment and university calibre isn't completely straight-forward because there are so many factors which have to be taken into the equation. This is not to say that's it's not advantageous to go to a highly ranked school, but it is certainly no disaster going to somewhere else.
The only thing I am afraid of the lower universities are that I wouldn't have the great job I want because people may think he's been in a ''low'' education and this could affect my part. Most firms tend to takr those who have experience if they haven't been in a top university, like you would need to know what to do ...etc. My grandfather graduated from a top 50 Arab category university, but he still managed to be the director of PWC ( biggest accountant company ) in Libya, I mean when I think about that if I am already in a top 20 in the world or in a country this may be goo enough to start a career.



(Original post by AdamTJ)
To an extent you're right, it is a test of natural reasoning ability. Don't underestimate it though. It is worth putting in the hours of practice, so that you get to grips with the style of question. The test is also far from easy! Despite taking it twice (as I took a gap year and re-applied), I never felt entirely comfortable doing it at any stage. I rank both occasions as two of the more difficult exam experiences I have had (and trust me, I have done a lot of exams in the past 7 years or so).
Yeah I wouldn't really underestimated that exam, but a slight revision...etc would be good, there are people who have good natural knowledge that could help them in that exam, and adding a little bit of work this may be good.




(Original post by AdamTJ)
You'd be surprised. It's much more common than you think. The interview at Oxbridge is often key, and if you fluff that, then you leave yourself with little chance. Obviously I'm not an admissions tutor, but I went through the applications palava twice and I can safely say I was always told the Oxbridge admissions tutors were much more interested in your academic "potential" than your extra-curriculars. Those are very much a periphery consideration (unless you're a world-class rower or something!).
Lol no I am not a world rower ... But if I get to improve myself, I may mark a history in Libya and with this I can do something of what I have achieved... trying to show to universities ''thats what I achieved'' and the sponsors I got and so on.
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TurboCretin
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(Original post by d.luffy)
Look man stop asking dumb questions, I have nothing to loose to try for the application.

Oxford brookes is considered a good Law university? what rating those it have like top 20s'?

And does Princeton and Yale university tend to be more tough to apply for? Or is it less? If I have a chance to enter Law in one of the top 10 in USA even if its 4 years there and 3 years in UK ill still go there
Look, Princeton and Yale are even more competitive than Oxford and Cambridge are. On top of excellent grades, you would need outstanding extracurriculars stretching back years, demonstrating a long-standing dedication to achievement related to your chosen degree. On top of your A-levels you will need very strong SATs.

I'm going to echo what everyone else is saying on here. You may apply to Oxford or Cambridge if you want, but without strong mitigating factors for your grades it will effectively be a wasted UCAS slot. You can't say "I'll try hard if I get in and THEN they'll see" because they don't want to take that risk. Anyone would try hard. You need a way to prove that you are a more promising candidate than the competition or you will not get the place.
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(Original post by TurboCretin)
Look, Princeton and Yale are even more competitive than Oxford and Cambridge are. On top of excellent grades, you would need outstanding extracurriculars stretching back years, demonstrating a long-standing dedication to achievement related to your chosen degree. On top of your A-levels you will need very strong SATs.

I'm going to echo what everyone else is saying on here. You may apply to Oxford or Cambridge if you want, but without strong mitigating factors for your grades it will effectively be a wasted UCAS slot. You can't say "I'll try hard if I get in and THEN they'll see" because they don't want to take that risk. Anyone would try hard. You need a way to prove that you are a more promising candidate than the competition or you will not get the place.
Yeah I noticed that about princeton and yale, its very very tough to get in ... Ill have to find a way anyways, achieving good grades ....etc And Ill have to do SATS for an extra exam or background if you know what I mean.
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TurboCretin
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(Original post by d.luffy)
Yeah I noticed that about princeton and yale, its very very tough to get in ... Ill have to find a way anyways, achieving good grades ....etc And Ill have to do SATS for an extra exam or background if you know what I mean.
I wish you luck with it
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(Original post by d.luffy)
Yeah I noticed that about princeton and yale, its very very tough to get in ... Ill have to find a way anyways, achieving good grades ....etc And Ill have to do SATS for an extra exam or background if you know what I mean.
I really hope this doesn't sound rude but you do really need to work on your English grammar. Law is a highly complex degree with judgments containing language that the average native English lay-person wouldn't understand.

Your written English will need to improve if you are applying to Oxbridge and if you are to get an A in English A level. In fact, to apply to any English-speaking university, it will need to improve.

I don't mean to sound rude and you are much better at English than i am at any other language. Just don't get your hopes up about going to Oxford as it is (in my view) extremely unlikely that you will get in (this is based on your GCSEs and your English).

I am aware this is an internet forum and you probably aren't trying your hardest.

Also, i may be wrong, but some of your comments suggest that you think A levels are easier in Lybia. I don't think this is correct, the standard is the same wherever you take them.
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