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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    I beg to differ not because I am a doctor but I work for one and he definitely has not forgotten his biochemistry and if he does he consults a text!
    So at what point during the day does this doctor who you work for go and pick up a book to check the structural difference between valine and glycine, or double check the inner workings of the krebs cycle?

    Please do share what biochemistry texts he/she frequently picks up to check things???

    You don't forget it ALL. But you forget a good chunk of it.
    Regardless of whether you have a prior degree in biochemistry.
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    (Original post by Jamie)
    So at what point during the day does this doctor who you work for go and pick up a book to check the structural difference between valine and glycine, or double check the inner workings of the krebs cycle?

    Please do share what biochemistry texts he/she frequently picks up to check things???

    You don't forget it ALL. But you forget a good chunk of it.
    Regardless of whether you have a prior degree in biochemistry.
    Right so I think you're confusing what I said and turning it into something else.

    I said a molecular understanding of the basis of diseases that you encounter helps you in the long run. What you are referring to (structures, components of the the Krebs cycle) is factual information. Concepts, not facts. There's a difference albeit a small one

    Are you telling me that it is not beneficial for a doctor to understand mechanisms of cellular processes-like how a virus enters a cell for example? (Understand-not remember all the steps of!)

    I'm a biochemist and have continued on into a PhD (my point being that I've stayed on the research side of things) and I certainly don't remember the structure of amino acids or all the components of the Krebs cycle, but if you gave me a blood test to read, I would understand it.

    Doctors liaise with consultant clinical scientists all the time when diagnosing or planning the courses of treatment but doctors who've had some amount of exposure to the pure sciences may find it easier to understand what's going on at the cellular level. I would say it is beneficial for a doctor to better understand what the drugs he/she's prescribing do at a cellular level as opposed to just at a more physiological, organ/organ system/whole body level.
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    Her opinion is irrelevant.

    You have a game plan, stick to it.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    Doctors liaise with consultant clinical scientists all the time when diagnosing or planning the courses of treatment but doctors who've had some amount of exposure to the pure sciences may find it easier to understand what's going on at the cellular level. I would say it is beneficial for a doctor to better understand what the drugs he/she's prescribing do at a cellular level as opposed to just at a more physiological, organ/organ system/whole body level.
    Again, don't disagree with the fundementals. Far from it. But there is a difference between having the vague ideas in your head (that need some refreshing only) and the raw facts.
    My issues was with "he definitely has not forgotten his biochemistry and if he does he consults a text!" which makes it sound like someone who is frequently checking up the anal stuff in a book.

    Blooming rare i speak toa consultant clinical scientist, the exception really being toxicologists and on exceptionally rare occasions a biochemist.

    But as regards what you have said in this post, completely agree about the basics. I can't explain it 100% to med students but can just bout explain DKA, where ketones come from, how they are bad and how to get rid of them.
    Thats based on basics for me!
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    (Original post by Jamie)
    Again, don't disagree with the fundementals. Far from it. But there is a difference between having the vague ideas in your head (that need some refreshing only) and the raw facts.
    My issues was with "he definitely has not forgotten his biochemistry and if he does he consults a text!" which makes it sound like someone who is frequently checking up the anal stuff in a book.

    Blooming rare i speak toa consultant clinical scientist, the exception really being toxicologists and on exceptionally rare occasions a biochemist.

    But as regards what you have said in this post, completely agree about the basics. I can't explain it 100% to med students but can just bout explain DKA, where ketones come from, how they are bad and how to get rid of them.
    Thats based on basics for me!
    No offense meant but the fact that you have 'issues' with someone consulting a text to look something up (however rare or common it may be) is a tad arrogant. Are you honestly telling me that if you did not completely understand a test report or what it means, you would not look it up/ask a biochemist?

    The point of this thread and my replies to it were to talk about why having a biochemistry degree as a first degree is not a waste of time so if you agree that understanding the basics is beneficial then the argument is pointless.

    Again like I said before, neither I (who is a biochemist) nor any of the scientists I know nor indeed the doctor I work for, look up anal stuff in texts so that's not what I was suggesting when I talked about consulting a text. Concepts, not facts.

    As far as how often you talk to a clinical scientist is concerned, well I guess it depends on what kind of doctor you are and what kind of patients you see. I wouldn't know about it from that perspective because I'm not a doctor. What I do know is from the perspective of a clinical scientist. They're constantly fielding calls from doctors about molecular diagnostics.
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    She may have a point but you should have asked her what other possible way it was you could get into medicine ? She seems to think she's a smartass in the medical application process. If you don't have the grades, you can't get in, simple as. Are you going to threaten or bribe the uni's or something ?

    It's a different story though if it was possible for you to retake some a level modules and try your luck, but fewer and fewer medical schools offering resits these days with almost all of them requiring an extenuating circumstance.
 
 
 
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