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What Are The Best Extra Curricular Activities To Secure A Top Tc Or Pupillage watch

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    Success at the particular EC is a different matter altogether. If you dont have the confidence to go through with certain ECs, then by all means abstain from that EC. You wont be saying goodbye to your top TC just like that, but it will make it that much harder to achieve.

    The point about a strong degree and interview is a bit questionable because at the highest level, as the OP seems to want to compete in, it is most likely that many candidates, if not all, will have superb degrees and will interview incredibly well. What distinguishes the men from the boys is who has that extra mile; who has that added benefit in his/her CV that will impress the recruiter enough to make him give you that amazing job. Bringing me back to my original point, the recruiter is hardly likely to be impressed by your long history of sewing rather than you being the President of the LawSoc; ultimately, its something that is on paper. You may have or may not have enjoyed it, but at the end, what you get out of it is of essential importance. President of the LawSoc may not be a "fun" ride, but it certainly will teach you a lot, and it certainly wont hurt on your CV.

    I dont think we must make the fact that it will be on our CV the top most priority. But, when considering what ECs to pursue in our time at uni, we certainly must give thought to how it will affect our future chances; where LawSoc President will come in much further than Sewing- regardless of how much "fun" you had doing it.
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    (Original post by manthi)
    Alright then, lets take an example:

    Two applicants A and B. A has been the LawSoc President, although, he has not had the greatest time of his life being so. He did not particularly love it, but still he went along with it for the fact that a) it teaches his some invaluable lessons b) it certainly does not hurt on a CV. B has been a fanatic of sewing since her tender ages, and had a very happy-go-lucky attitude, believed that if she did what she enjoyed, it'll come through for her. So she has sewing in her CV.

    Who do you reckon will get the TC? A, who, albeit his lower passion for what he did, was the LawSoc President, or B, who, with immense passion, has sewing.

    Its unquestionable that there will always be certain ECs that employers prefer than others, no matter how much you liked it or not. How many times in our lives have we done things that, although they were not particularly enjoyable, we did it because we thought we'd learn something from it, or it would help us in the future? Same principle. You dont have to go around ticking boxes of "LawSoc President" if you've hated responsibility all your life, but, if you dont have a passion against it, then why not go for it? Wont it help you in your future? Wont you learn some invaluable lessons off it?
    Here is a possible ending to consider however ....

    Person A is asked at interview what they gained from the lawsoc presidency and it becomes apparent they only did it because it would look good. The interviewers then regard said person as unable to think for themselves, having done what other people told them would be a good idea. Mindless following of the crowd does not lead to the ability to think of novel soultions and therefore is not a useful attribute as a lawyer.

    Hasn't it occured to you by doing what everyone else does you're not actually setting yourself aside from the crowd?
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    I hardly think that becoming LawSoc President wont set yourself aside from the crowd.

    Next, sure, we can set ourselves aside from the crowd by doing sewing, playing tic-tac-toe, and claim during our interview that playing tic-tac-toe immensely sharpened our analytical skills. But is that really the way we want to set ourselves aside from the crowd by doing? Im sure we will get the job (heavy sarcasm).

    Whatsmore is that I doubt that a person who was capable enough to actually become the LawSoc president does not possess the ability to tell the recruiters during interview what he gained from it. For a person to go such a long way, its not just dumb luck, he possesses some ability and it is highly unlikely that he would not be able to convey to the recruiters what he truly gained from the experience; either he is drunk/ or he was involved in electoral malpractice.

    Let me turn that question around on you. Person B is asked at interview what they gained from sewing, and what becomes apparent? That he did it ever so passionately? Do you really think the recruiters will give two hoots that he loved it and gained the virtue of patience from it?
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    Capable of becoming lawsoc president = popular enough to get most votes. It doesn't give any indication of ability to do the job.

    I'm tired of going over the same ground again and again, so let me say this one more time ...

    You consider it irresponsible to advocate gaining skills through enjoyable activities, however, such an assertion is based on your subjective opinions. I am equally entitled to accuse all of those who adovacte the box ticking approach to life as being irresponsible because it increases stress and decreases enjoyment of life. Life, after all is said and done, is finite and if someone chooses to waste it that is theor perogative. However, I do not believe we should be advising people who have yet to start their degree that if they:

    - don't have 10 GCSEs at grade A or above
    - don't have 4 A-Levels at A
    - haven't got into a "top flight" uni
    - chose ECs which are fun instead of all trying to be lawsoc president (after all during the course of someone's degree only 3 people will be lawsoc president and therefore hundreds will not)

    they are doomed to failure. Such assertions are negative and may prevent the person from trying to achieve their full potential.
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    It seems that we re "shadow boxing on different planes". I certainly do agree on that point- you are certainly not doomed to failure if you dont have those particular points.

    But what I disagree with you is:
    a) Life is short??(you said it in an earlier post) - its the longest thing we do.

    b) The point about doing ECs that are only "fun" for you; Ive given all my reasons in the above posts, and without contending any of them, you have gone to some safe ground by saying that you're against something that any rational being would be against (ie: the whole not doomed to failure thing). You have in no way contended the point about the Candidate A & B and neither have you answered the question I asked you earlier.
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    I understand where you're coming from that if you dont have a particular set of GCSEs you're far from being doomed to failure. But doing ECs soully for the purpose of enjoyment as opposed to its impact on the future, is still, questionable.
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    Life may well be the longest thing we do, but we do not know when it will come to an end.

    Candidate B - I spose it depends to some extent on what sort of sewing they do. Take for example cross stitch embroidery. To do one of this properly required meticulous planning, attention to detail and commitment to follow the project through. I would also asume it requires a lot of spare time

    I'd be interested (and this is genuine not sarcastic) in your opinion on people who do voluntary work in order to tick the box. I said in a post back i nthe mists of time that I train volunteers and honestly you wouldn ot believe the number of people who do the training so they can say they have, but never do the work. Or who do the minimum they can get away with for the minimum length of time. Do you think it's acceptable for people to effectively abuse charities for their own CV building ends?
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    Going to jump in...

    I'm not into law, apols. I think you're nuts to do it I'm going into Investment Banking and have a number of extra-curriculars under my belt. I've liked doing them. Sometimes it's been tough, time consuming and I wonder at times if it is right to do it. Other times, it is fantastic, amazing, brilliant, wouldn't want it any other way.

    Titles mean nothing. Achievements are the things you do that impact others. Not the titles you gain. It is well worth doing extra-curriculars who will want to do because you will get the most out of them. Not all ECs are equal in terms of what they ask for, what they give you, what you can put in.

    But it being uni, try everything.
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    ooooooooooo we have a friendly investment banker. anyone up for scamming him? lol
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    (Original post by Ethereal)
    You consider it irresponsible to advocate gaining skills through enjoyable activities, however, such an assertion is based on your subjective opinions.
    A touch of straw man about your post Ethereal! manthi never said it was irresponsible to gain skills in such a way, rather that recruiters may interpret certain activities in a particular way.
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    Manthi said advocating my "happy-go-lucky" approach is wrong, the implication of which being that it is irrepsonsible, ergo the above post stands.
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    (Original post by manthi)
    Success at the particular EC is a different matter altogether. If you dont have the confidence to go through with certain ECs, then by all means abstain from that EC. You wont be saying goodbye to your top TC just like that, but it will make it that much harder to achieve.

    The point about a strong degree and interview is a bit questionable because at the highest level, as the OP seems to want to compete in, it is most likely that many candidates, if not all, will have superb degrees and will interview incredibly well. What distinguishes the men from the boys is who has that extra mile; who has that added benefit in his/her CV that will impress the recruiter enough to make him give you that amazing job. Bringing me back to my original point, the recruiter is hardly likely to be impressed by your long history of sewing rather than you being the President of the LawSoc; ultimately, its something that is on paper. You may have or may not have enjoyed it, but at the end, what you get out of it is of essential importance. President of the LawSoc may not be a "fun" ride, but it certainly will teach you a lot, and it certainly wont hurt on your CV.

    I dont think we must make the fact that it will be on our CV the top most priority. But, when considering what ECs to pursue in our time at uni, we certainly must give thought to how it will affect our future chances; where LawSoc President will come in much further than Sewing- regardless of how much "fun" you had doing it.
    For some EC's it's not a matter of confidence. You can put all the effort in the world and it does not mean that whatever you are working for will fall into your lap.
    Personally I have no idea what percentage of people going for the top firms have for example firsts at university, and therefore i was commenting on what seems logical to me. I don't believe that EVERYONE who applies has the string of straight A* and As at GCSE and A level respectively, fantastic interview technique, and a first degree, but i may be wrong.
    Also I think it would be far more helpful for the OP and the rest of us if President of the Law society is not the only EC cited as being of any standing or 'use'. Can we get more back to the point and give suggestions?
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    I said that advocating to people that merely doing ECs for the sole purpose of enjoyment was irresponsible, because not many would find their dream job by doing sewing and tic-tac-toe during their time at university. I did not say that it was wrong of you to advocate gaining skills from them, however much it will "set u aside" from the rest.

    Coming to your point about volunteer work. Whether or not they actually do the volunteer work is a different matter altogether. That is upto the individual. And in my opinion, its pretty dirty to take up charity work and not give it your best because you're not bothered about it. However, the question at hand is prior to actually taking up the work; its the decision, do I take up this charity work or not? Thats the question here, not whether he actually does the work or not.

    We may not find charity work in par with a night out with friends, but when deciding whether to take it up or not, we should consider the impact it can have on our future. What a person does, after having made that decision is up to that person; whether it be give your best even though you dont particularly like it, or be a sleazy b*****d.

    Edit: That was in response to Ethereal, not different. And yes Different we shall get back to the point. I was just contending what Ethereal was saying about doing ECs merely for the fun of it.
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    (Original post by Ethereal)
    Manthi said advocating my "happy-go-lucky" approach is wrong,
    No, I disagree. I interpreted his comments were more along the lines that certain activities are instantly more marketable than others, and that to some degree an understanding of this point may be useful to those who want to reach the "top" (whatever the top is).

    He didn't say you were wrong. He didn't say your approach wouldn't work for some people in certain circumstances. However I think he is right to point out that for certain jobs highly marketable ECs are going to be an advantage, with all other things being equal between job candidates. That's not unreasonable as a general point of view. There will always be exceptions, but to merely focus on the exceptions rather than the rule would be folly.
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    I commend you IC Law.
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    (Original post by IC Law)
    No, I disagree. I interpreted his comments were more along the lines that certain activities are instantly more marketable than others, and that to some degree an understanding of this point may be useful to those who want to reach the "top" (whatever the top is).

    Then it is a matter of interpretation. I interpreted it in a way that led me to the post I made :p:
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    [\quote]Then it is a matter of interpretation. I interpreted it in a way that led me to the post I made :p:[/QUOTE]

    :rolleyes:
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    This debate seems to be going round and round in circles and now appears to be focusing upon semantics. I would suggest a return to the original question.
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    No offence intended Ethereal, but I think you are willfully misinterpreting some of the posts on this thread. I was pointing out in my last point that perhaps there is more than one way to interpret manthi's post, and my interpretation (and indeed the way in which it was intended) was quite different to what you understood from his comments.

    I appreciate this is a subject close to your heart, but just because a few people on this thread have expressed different views to you on the subject does not mean:

    (a) They are wrong or misguided to hold their views.
    (b) They are attacking your position as being wholly wrong.

    We are, however, digressing wildly from the point of this thread which was to offer advice (or not) regarding extra curricular activities to the original poster. To the OP, it depends on what skills you want to learn about and demonstrate through your activities. Obvious things to consider include:

    (1) find out about your Law Soc and Debating Soc when you get to uni.
    (2) perhaps consider getting involved in the governance of your student union or as an academic representative.
    (3) are there any advice services, free representation units etc that you could get involved in?

    Disclaimer: I give my advice as someone who studied as an undergraduate at an institution that didn't have a law department. Your institution may well have more to offer you in preparation for your future career.
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    Re the advice side ..... if your uni doesn't do ProBono work your students union will still have an advice centre and nightline. Try volunteering there.
 
 
 
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