dj89
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#61
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#61
(Original post by ttoby)
There's someone I know who does lots of sports, music and going out and they got a fairly solid 2.1 at the end of the first year. Someone else spent a lot of their time doing maths and got a 1st. Someone else got involved in a society, didn't go out a massive amount and got a 2.2 - it varies between people. Later on in the degree the work does get harder so you might find that you're not able to spend as much time on your hobbies.

Edit: many of these people only just about met their offer to get in

You don't need to apply to Rootes to have a social life - you can say in your personal description of yourself that you want to be with sociable people. I was in westwood and the advantage of being there is that you can easily access the corridors and kitchens for about 70 rooms without meeting a locked door, so that's good if you don't get along with the people near you. Rootes has that as well but the buildings are much bigger so you can access much more of it.

It's more of a mental thing as to why you would leave work till the last minute. Initially you might do it well in advance but later on it's very common to leave it till much later as you would just rather be doing something else. This is especially a problem with those homeworks that aren't for credit - because you're not bring pushed to do them then you might even leave them until revision time. Later on in the course there are more homeworks like this which makes things harder. Also some homeworks rely on material that's not covered in lectures until a few days before the deadline.
What year are you in? I'm also interested to know how many CATs people take - would it be good to stick as close to 120 as possible if I don't want a huge workload? When you refer to 'later on in the course' - do you mean in later years? Or later in the 1st year?
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Hodor
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#62
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#62
(Original post by dj89)
What year are you in? I'm also interested to know how many CATs people take - would it be good to stick as close to 120 as possible if I don't want a huge workload? When you refer to 'later on in the course' - do you mean in later years? Or later in the 1st year?
Taking more than 120 CATS will be fine, and I think most people do over-CAT. In my second year I took 133ish (so basically one extra module) which was no problem, and meant that my score got boosted by 5% at the end of the year.

As for the non-compulsory homeworks, ttoby was probably talking about the 3rd and 4th years, which have no core modules, and are usually assessed by exams in the final term (there are some exceptions).

The homework schedule for the first two years (core) looks something like this:

Year 1, term 1: weekly analysis booklets, foundations test every two weeks, differential equations sheets every two weeks, abstract algebra sheets every week for the last five weeks.

Year 1, term 2: weekly sheets in analysis and linear algebra, geometry and motion sheets every two weeks, computing assignments every other week.

Year 2, term 1: analysis, vector analysis and algebra sheets every two weeks.

Year 2, term 2: algebra sheets every two weeks.
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ttoby
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#63
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#63
(Original post by dj89)
What year are you in? I'm also interested to know how many CATs people take - would it be good to stick as close to 120 as possible if I don't want a huge workload? When you refer to 'later on in the course' - do you mean in later years? Or later in the 1st year?
I'm in my fourth year, and by 'later on' I mean in the later years. It's a fairly gradual change though as to how much is assessed, and it does vary depending on which modules you take.

Many people take more than 120 CATS as they boost your score a bit if you do so. But generally you would only do one or two modules extra. However, I've heard they're thinking of getting rid of that system so it might be the case for you that there is no extra benefit for doing more than the minimum.
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dj89
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#64
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#64
(Original post by Hodor)
Taking more than 120 CATS will be fine, and I think most people do over-CAT. In my second year I took 133ish (so basically one extra module) which was no problem, and meant that my score got boosted by 5% at the end of the year.

As for the non-compulsory homeworks, ttoby was probably talking about the 3rd and 4th years, which have no core modules, and are usually assessed by exams in the final term (there are some exceptions).

The homework schedule for the first two years (core) looks something like this:

Year 1, term 1: weekly analysis booklets, foundations test every two weeks, differential equations sheets every two weeks, abstract algebra sheets every week for the last five weeks.

Year 1, term 2: weekly sheets in analysis and linear algebra, geometry and motion sheets every two weeks, computing assignments every other week.

Year 2, term 1: analysis, vector analysis and algebra sheets every two weeks.

Year 2, term 2: algebra sheets every two weeks.
Thanks that's very helpful - do you know if physics modules have compulsory homework too, or is that just assessed at the end of the year? How many CATs did you take in 1st year, did you feel like you had enough time to do other things?
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fGDu
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#65
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#65
(Original post by Hodor)
Taking more than 120 CATS will be fine, and I think most people do over-CAT. In my second year I took 133ish (so basically one extra module) which was no problem, and meant that my score got boosted by 5% at the end of the year.

As for the non-compulsory homeworks, ttoby was probably talking about the 3rd and 4th years, which have no core modules, and are usually assessed by exams in the final term (there are some exceptions).

The homework schedule for the first two years (core) looks something like this:

Year 1, term 1: weekly analysis booklets, foundations test every two weeks, differential equations sheets every two weeks, abstract algebra sheets every week for the last five weeks.

Year 1, term 2: weekly sheets in analysis and linear algebra, geometry and motion sheets every two weeks, computing assignments every other week.

Year 2, term 1: analysis, vector analysis and algebra sheets every two weeks.

Year 2, term 2: algebra sheets every two weeks.
Well I just finished year 1 term 2 and I found it to be a bit different...

weekly sheets in analysis, linear algebra AND geometry and motion. Fortnightly sheets in probability, MATLAB assignments for the last 6 weeks, and (optionally) java programming assignments, 3 in the term.

It has been quite a tough term. Also there are physics assignments but they are not for credit for maths students.
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harr
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#66
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#66
(Original post by dj89)
are all these horror stories really true? i have an offer for maths at warwick but am scared im gonna spend my whole time working
I can't comment on Warwick specifically, but at Cambridge there's quite a bit of freedom in how much work you do. I'd guess (though probably not very accurately) that the typical student would do fine if they were to do at least 30 hours a week (one-third lectures, two-thirds questions), though that doesn't mean that there won't be people doing 60. Obviously most people aren't typical, and different people will have different aims, but it should be possible to have fun and do well.
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goldenforever
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#67
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#67
(Original post by dragonrabbit)
:woo:
By % I was meaning the % of maths you have to complete - not the no. of compulsory modules It was my understanding that by 3rd year you only needed to do 50% maths in order to get the degree at the end of it ^_^ was more for a masters)
From my calculations, I seem to remember for my three year course I hope to enter 60% has to be Maths. The percentage is different for different years though, I'd suggest the longer your there the less Maths you have to do.

I'm also under the impression that the Maths course allows a lot of Freedom at Warwick. I wanted to do a little bit of computer science-y stuff and it seems that is very much allowed.
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placenta medicae talpae
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#68
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#68
(Original post by goldenforever)
I'm also under the impression that the Maths course allows a lot of Freedom at Warwick. I wanted to do a little bit of computer science-y stuff and it seems that is very much allowed.
Yep, that is the case.
All you have to do is fill in an 'unusual option form' and get it signed by the relevant people.
These requests are very often granted.

I did the computer science module 'Discrete Maths and Applications 1' when I was in first year.
That might even be a 'usual option' for those who study maths, so might not even require the form-filling (I do MORSE, stats department so not 100% sure about that).
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ttoby
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#69
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#69
(Original post by placenta medicae talpae)
I did the computer science module 'Discrete Maths and Applications 1' when I was in first year.
That might even be a 'usual option' for those who study maths, so might not even require the form-filling (I do MORSE, stats department so not 100% sure about that).
That used to be the case (I even did the module myself) but not any more. So, since there's probably a reason for removing it then if you try adding it as an unusual option then it could be refused.

However, there are some other computer science modules that can be taken by maths students without unusual option forms.
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