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The whole "study what you love" thing is stupid and unrealistic watch

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    (Original post by rjm101)
    In my opinion you have to compensate it can't just be about employment prospects and it can’t just be about choosing something you find interesting. You should find something that fulfils both of these aspects because without an interest in it you wont get far and will always just do the bare minimum. In addition without employment prospects your efforts will result in nothing but an unrelated job and chances are if you did get a job you probably had to do a lot of voluntary work and internships just to get there. On top of that when you do eventually get the job it will probably be low paid.

    To those that disregard employment prospects then my only advice is to make sure you truly have passion for it which would be evident to the people who know you because you will need it to compete in the uber competitive job market. Simply having an interest would not be enough.
    Exactly but then again what would you advise? (if you read my previous post)
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    I think it should be more "study what you like- if you can get a job from it". Then again that's more competition for me and everyone else so... xD
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    I think a balance is important. Study what you believe you will find interesting, of course. If you're not interested in a subject there's no way you'll be able to keep it up. Although you might be right in saying it's pointless to study a subject simply 'because it's interesting', many people see a degree as a pathway to their future career. Therefore, it is necessary for them to study it. I don't agree with the idea of doing a degree for the sake of it; however I think if a person has a genuine desire for more knowledge of a particular subject, and could see the degree guiding them to a future career, I don't think it is a waste of time at all.
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    (Original post by theimprobableone)
    I think a balance is important. Study what you believe you will find interesting, of course. If you're not interested in a subject there's no way you'll be able to keep it up. Although you might be right in saying it's pointless to study a subject simply 'because it's interesting', many people see a degree as a pathway to their future career. Therefore, it is necessary for them to study it. I don't agree with the idea of doing a degree for the sake of it; however I think if a person has a genuine desire for more knowledge of a particular subject, and could see the degree guiding them to a future career, I don't think it is a waste of time at all.
    Agreed


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    (Original post by Fortitude)
    Now because I'm in this situation myself, a question I have is: Is the difference (most likley not that big) in employment prospects worth the extra effort you probably will have to put in during your degree? So for eg choose a Maths degree or Biology one?
    Choosing a degree with better employment prospects doesn’t mean extra effort. That’s largely based on the particular degree you choose. Like I said, you have to strike a balance so presuming you did choose a degree with better employment prospects you should have no problem making the effort because you should still have an interest in the subject.
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    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    I think this is so sad if it is actually true ... I do not recall it being true when I was studying but that was a long time ago
    Oh, it's definitely true nowadays, and I'm one of them. It's a Sunday afternoon and there are so many things I'd rather be doing than writing up coursework. There are so many things I'd rather being doing this May then exams. There are so many things I'd rather be doing this Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday morning than attend lectures. I'll be ecstatic once it's all done this summer.

    The reason so many attend university is not out of passion for their subject (I'd say that that's quite rare to be honest; many end up choosing their subject because they got the best grades in it at school or disliked it least) but because there is so little opportunity to do anything career-wise these days without at least a bachelors degree. The days of apprenticeships are gone; governments have happily waved goodbye to the industries that took them on in any real numbers, leaving non-graduates to be largely stuck in dead-end jobs. And jobs that yesteryear were done by school leavers or apprentices are now open only to graduates, too. Many engineering graduate jobs I have been applying to that required an MEng, were done yesteryear by apprentices and school leavers.

    The university lifestyle is also pretty cushy as well, one of my other key motivations for attending. As happy as I will be to no longer have to learn maths and equations that I will never use again, I will be sad to see the end of that lifestyle and have to enter the 9-5...

    It might be sad that passion for the subject isn't a popular reason for attending university but it's indicative of the corporate bureaucracy we live in where a degree is merely needed so that some HR drone can tick a box. That's all the degree is really worth to a lot of people.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Oh, it's definitely true nowadays, and I'm one of them. It's a Sunday afternoon and there are so many things I'd rather be doing than writing up coursework. There are so many things I'd rather being doing this May then exams. There are so many things I'd rather be doing this Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday morning than attend lectures. I'll be ecstatic once it's all done this summer.

    The reason so many attend university is not out of passion for their subject (I'd say that that's quite rare to be honest; many end up choosing their subject because they got the best grades in it at school or disliked it least) but because there is so little opportunity to do anything career-wise these days without at least a bachelors degree. The days of apprenticeships are gone; governments have happily waved goodbye to the industries that took them on in any real numbers, leaving non-graduates to be largely stuck in dead-end jobs. And jobs that yesteryear were done by school leavers or apprentices are now open only to graduates, too. Many engineering graduate jobs I have been applying to that required an MEng, were done yesteryear by apprentices and school leavers.

    The university lifestyle is also pretty cushy as well, one of my other key motivations for attending. As happy as I will be to no longer have to learn maths and equations that I will never use again, I will be sad to see the end of that lifestyle and have to enter the 9-5...

    It might be sad that passion for the subject isn't a popular reason for attending university but it's indicative of the corporate bureaucracy we live in where a degree is merely needed so that some HR drone can tick a box. That's all the degree is really worth to a lot of people.
    Smack, days of apprenticeships are not over. Have you seen a TED talk from a guy who does "Dirty Jobs" show? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRVdiHu1VCc

    Hear what the guy is saying. The trend in going to university is increasing, the costs are raising a lot more than inflation and the brainwash almost reached it's maximum. There are more and more people getting a trade, setting up a business and living a great life.

    However, I agree that a lot of people are going to uni just for the sake of doing nothing else or getting a job. I have a friend who is doing stuff differently. He took a gap year and worked in the UK while doing volunteer work in a variety of industries. He crossed out a lot of subjects he did not like to work in. Now he will apply for CS because that is what caught his attention and felt as a job he admires.

    However, OP point is good too. I would not do a degree in subject that is not in demand. I don't want to waste my time learning stuff which will not get me a job or won't help in setting my own business because no one cares about what I learned. Luckily, I took gap year too and found that I love programming. I love it because I spent my life tinkering over problems in math, biology, chemistry. I'm good at figuring things out and abstract thinking. I find myself walking in the spring weather and thinking about that Project Euler problem. And usually I solve it without a computer while walking To be honest, this is where my current interest lies. What the future brings, I have no idea.
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    Universities are not for churning out good little worker bees, they're for studying your passion and become wiser and more knowledgeable about your subject area and the world as a whole. You of course have to balance it to a degree with what you're realistically going to earn afterwards to pay your loan back though.
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    To be quite honest, I want to do Medicine, but I disagree with what you are saying.

    So pick a degree to study something you hate, to help you get a job that you hate just to earn money that you use to continue to live so you can keep working in something you hate, just so at the end of your life you look back and realise every one of your motives was money, and then you realise its too late and die in a deep puddle of regret, just to be buried 6 feet under ground and forgotten about?

    Sounds like a **** idea. Do something you enjoy, every single time.
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    (Original post by awilson008)
    To be quite honest, I want to do Medicine, but I disagree with what you are saying.

    So pick a degree to study something you hate, to help you get a job that you hate just to earn money that you use to continue to live so you can keep working in something you hate, just so at the end of your life you look back and realise every one of your motives was money, and then you realise its too late and die in a deep puddle of regret, just to be buried 6 feet under ground and forgotten about?

    Sounds like a **** idea. Do something you enjoy, every single time.
    Agree for the majority

    It would have to depend on the person though, some (arguably most) people are motivated by money, and so will try and choose the profession which makes the most money, and if having lots of money makes you happy, then sure go for it, but then again I also know people who aren't earning as much, and some of them are the happiest, kindest people I've ever seen. Money can certainly open doors for you but it won't necessarily make you happy.

    Also, money doesn't define you as a person, at first glance it may say that you're hard working and dedicated, but a rich douche-bag is still a douche-bag.

    It is a hard one to argue as you study for something which you will do for the majority of your life, and that isn't a decision which many people can make when they're 17-18. For example, you wanna study medicine, and that's a tough and long course, and obviously I don't know you but say hypothetically you decide 3 years in that you don't want to do medicine anymore, then you're in a sticky situation, which I'm sure is what's happened to alot of people before.

    Sorry, rant over. Life is hard
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    If you do something you enjoy and are passionate about you are more likely to put the effort in at uni and therefore come out with a better degree. Ultimately most employers will want a candidate that has come from a reputable university and with at least a 2:1. If you don't know what you want to do after uni then I would say study what interests you, get the best degree possible as many employers don't ask for specific degrees but want the individual to show the motivation, dedication and skills learned that come hand in hand with getting a good degree.
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    But I love coding and I'm going into an area which requires is... Bonus
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    I agree with your ideas to a point.
    But I wouldn't study something I completely detested purely to earn money.

    I love the concept of law, and hence want to study it further.
    I do love business slightly more but I don't want to get a business degree because I find it to be useless.

    So for me, it's: find an equilibrium between enjoyment and job opportunities
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    (Original post by Caitlan)
    I agree with your ideas to a point.
    But I wouldn't study something I completely detested purely to earn money.(...)
    I agree. If I would study, it must be a subject which interest me. It would be natural science in my case.
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    (Original post by CodeJack)
    But I love coding and I'm going into an area which requires is... Bonus
    We are fortunate, the coders. Employers and your may-be co-workers will want to see what you built, created, failed and learned. They do not care about degrees. At least not in graduate schemes. This is in my country.
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    (Original post by Valentas)
    We are fortunate, the coders. Employers and your may-be co-workers will want to see what you built, created, failed and learned. They do not care about degrees. At least not in graduate schemes. This is in my country.
    what country are you in?

    In the UK they do care about what degree you have, then you have experience and popularity in the coding world which will help you get the job ontop, but you need the base degree to get into the market.
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    I'm in Lithuania. People in their first year, especially motivated like several of my friends, work in software companies already. Employers come to uni with cries that they need more people. That is the situation here. Education quality, however, is not good. UK is far far far more superior. But as you probably know, software engineers are mostly self-taught whether with degree or not. :}
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    (Original post by combbrah)
    But you can learn pretty much everything about any subject without going to university, so if they don't care about increasing their chances of employment then why wouldn't they do that? It'd be much cheaper and they could work at their own pace/schedule.

    Cmon who are you kidding, university and degrees have always been about employment
    Who do you think researches and publishes that information about those subjects so you can read it online? :curious:
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    (Original post by redmoonrabbit)
    Firstly, as a student who is aiming to study art at university, I think your post is aimed in my kind of direction.
    I'd like to tell you 3 reasons why I'm doing it:
    1) I love art. I have always loved art, I want to do art for the rest of my life.
    2) Most of the reason I'm going to uni is so that I can continue to study art for the next four years of my life. I don't want to do anything, even it means taking a less well-paid less successful job when I'm older. I'd rather do something I really want to do for the next four years considering I'm going to have to pay for it.
    3) Art is not always a wasted degree. Some design/media/film/animation companies only take on people who have a relevant degree (aka art). So, if you're good, you can still possibly get a well-paid successful job.

    Look, I've found some middle ground. Woohoo
    I have to add, animated movies are some of the best movies going, the amount of freedom for creativity is amazing and the designers, writers, and all of them really are something to praise.
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    (Original post by TheGrinningSkull)
    I have to add, animated movies are some of the best movies going, the amount of freedom for creativity is amazing and the designers, writers, and all of them really are something to praise.
    I know, right! Quite a lot of my favourite films are animated. It allows for them to made very comical, provides unique and interesting characters, and explores options which may not be available in the real world. What's not to love?
 
 
 
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