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    For the jobs I'm interested in, here are the starting salaries:

    Boots Dispenser (most likely destination after graduating - easy to get in, experience etc) 13k

    Boots Store Manager (Graduate) 23k

    Police - 18k

    Hospital Pharmacy Technician 18-22k

    I'm pretty sure I'll end up in one of those four jobs.

    In terms of salary progression, being a police officer offers the greatest career and highest salary, followed by a pharmacy technician, store manager and pharmacy dispenser.

    God knows where I'll end up. Will be happy with a job tbfh.
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    (Original post by Sagga)
    First year right student right now. Have internship offer for 3 months. £25k pro rata. 3 and a half years left still at uni...
    25K I can believe, but not 33K straight off...
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    (Original post by ebam_uk)
    I love these threads it shows the delusion of student people... in general.
    I'm not sure why people quoting a high figure are automatically assumed to be "delusional", as opposed to the other possibility - that the degree they're doing, internships they've done etc. generally do lead to starting salaries that high.

    The person quoted £33-36k - and there are plenty of graduate schemes (e.g. consultancy, actuarial, investment banking, law) paying easily that much. Some newly qualified medics might get around that much if you include their "unsociable hours" supplements as well. For some people, expecting that it's quite likely to end up in a job like this is pretty reasonable. It's not as though you have to win The Apprentice to get to those kinds of figures.
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    I'm a dreamer. I'm guessing I'm going to change careers quite a lot in the future. Will definitely have one steady job with a few part times circling around. Guessing 30k-50k. But there is income from real estate.
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    I'm not sure why people quoting a high figure are automatically assumed to be "delusional", as opposed to the other possibility - that the degree they're doing, internships they've done etc. generally do lead to starting salaries that high.

    The person quoted £33-36k - and there are plenty of graduate schemes (e.g. consultancy, actuarial, investment banking, law) paying easily that much. Some newly qualified medics might get around that much if you include their "unsociable hours" supplements as well. For some people, expecting that it's quite likely to end up in a job like this is pretty reasonable. It's not as though you have to win The Apprentice to get to those kinds of figures.
    The person who said that is doing Comp Sci. Pretty much every graduate job I've seen for jobs in the IT field (ie: starting wage) is circa 25K

    Hence it's unlikely that they'd get 33K straight off. Maybe 33K after 6 - 12 months, but not straight off
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    (Original post by de_monies)
    25K I can believe, but not 33K straight off...
    I still haven't completed my studies. I started uni in October 2012 lol. My internship offer for summer 2013 is that. Surely it will increase when I have more knowledge after my masters?
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    What ever will able me to live a life which I don't have to struggle with finance.
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    (Original post by de_monies)
    The person who said that is doing Comp Sci. Pretty much every graduate job I've seen for jobs in the IT field (ie: starting wage) is circa 25K

    Hence it's unlikely that they'd get 33K straight off. Maybe 33K after 6 - 12 months, but not straight off
    People studying Computer Science don't necessarily have to go on to work in the IT field though, do they? Most of the types of graduate schemes I was talking about would be happy to take on someone with any degree, or any "numerate" degree. Some might even be quite suited for Computer Science graduates e.g. Technology Consulting.

    I agree that most graduates probably won't see those kinds of starting salaries, because they're not all going to apply to/get onto these schemes. But I still think that some people will have good reason to expect that they probably will (e.g. if they've done a relevant internship).
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    I'm not sure why people quoting a high figure are automatically assumed to be "delusional", as opposed to the other possibility - that the degree they're doing, internships they've done etc. generally do lead to starting salaries that high.

    The person quoted £33-36k - and there are plenty of graduate schemes (e.g. consultancy, actuarial, investment banking, law) paying easily that much. Some newly qualified medics might get around that much if you include their "unsociable hours" supplements as well. For some people, expecting that it's quite likely to end up in a job like this is pretty reasonable. It's not as though you have to win The Apprentice to get to those kinds of figures.

    TbH i guess if you can get into a "brand" name company that salary is realistic.... but u have to look past the salary and quantify benefits and working hours..

    ie derive the hourly rate of course someone working 70 hours should be paid a lot more than someone doing 37.5 hours.
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    (Original post by de_monies)
    The person who said that is doing Comp Sci. Pretty much every graduate job I've seen for jobs in the IT field (ie: starting wage) is circa 25K

    Hence it's unlikely that they'd get 33K straight off. Maybe 33K after 6 - 12 months, but not straight off
    You also have to look at their qualifications. What univeristy? What degree? First or 2:1. Also their experience. I'm willing to make a bet that I'll get that much when I graduate
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    (Original post by Sagga)
    I still haven't completed my studies. I started uni in October 2012 lol. My internship offer for summer 2013 is that. Surely it will increase when I have more knowledge after my masters?
    Masters maybe. But not straight after graduation

    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    People studying Computer Science don't necessarily have to go on to work in the IT field though, do they? Most of the types of graduate schemes I was talking about would be happy to take on someone with any degree, or any "numerate" degree. Some might even be quite suited for Computer Science graduates e.g. Technology Consulting.

    I agree that most graduates probably won't see those kinds of starting salaries, because they're not all going to apply to/get onto these schemes. But I still think that some people will have good reason to expect that they probably will (e.g. if they've done a relevant internship).
    This is true, but even with a "relevant internship" you're looking at the same sorta figure. Most people doing CS go in to IT. It's not like studying history, or geography or whatever. There is a set sector that people go in to. Like people who study law *tend* to go in to law etc...

    (Original post by Sagga)
    You also have to look at their qualifications. What univeristy? What degree? First or 2:1. Also their experience. I'm willing to make a bet that I'll get that much when I graduate
    OK, you have experience, you have qualifications, you go to a good uni, you have a good degree with a first etc... The starting wage is still around 25K and often they say we want you to have a 2:1 at least

    For the record, Cisco consider our uni (for the course offered) one of the best in the whole of Europe:
    http://www.staffs.ac.uk/undergraduat...uter_networks/

    And our graduates do get paid more at graduation (according to payscale) but it's more like an extra 2-3K, instead of an extra 10K more.

    It's definitely possible to get the average wage of 45K, but not straight after graduation. Maybe 6 months to 2 years after, but not straight after, unless you're lucky
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    If I graduate as a pharmacist, I would expect about 21k in today's money for the pre-reg year, going up to around 26k the following year, after becoming a registered pharmacist
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
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    (Original post by de_monies)
    x
    Naturally, people seem to neg anyone suggesting anything above £30,000. However, it can in many cases be very reasonable to expect such a high salary.

    An average Warwick computer scientist will earn around £26,000.
    An average Cambridge computer scientist will earn around £30,000.
    An average Cambridge economist will earn £40,000.

    However, if the graduate chose to go into consultancy/finance (which, importantly, not all choose to do!) then their expected salary would be higher. A Cambridge economist who was on track for first-class honours and wanted to work in finance/consultancy could happily expect £45,000+ aged 21.

    I think people don't recognise that top graduates can earn £100,000+ by the age of 25 just by following a standard (but very competitive) route.

    Cambridge graduate, 3 years of work, MBA, and then hired by an MBB consultancy firm in the States:
    A total of £125,000, aged 25 (basic £80,000 + signing/performance bonuses).
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    (Original post by Upper Echelons)

    If you graduated from Cambridge and then did a prestigious MBA, then in your first year of work an MBB consultancy firm in the States would pay you a total of £125,000, aged 22 (basic £80,000 + signing/performance bonuses).
    Moral of the story: Yes, the average for the vast majority of Russell Group graduates will be around £20-25,000, but once you hit the top end, it blows completely out of proportion, as demand for the top 1% far exceeds supply.
    Pretty sure most decent MBAs require like, 3-5 years work experience before they'll look at you. Also are hella expensive if you're not being funded.
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    (Original post by Slumpy)
    Pretty sure most decent MBAs require like, 3-5 years work experience before they'll look at you. Also are hella expensive if you're not being funded.
    Very true, I forgot about the experience. I'll edit :yy:
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    (Original post by de_monies)
    Masters maybe. But not straight after graduation



    This is true, but even with a "relevant internship" you're looking at the same sorta figure. Most people doing CS go in to IT. It's not like studying history, or geography or whatever. There is a set sector that people go in to. Like people who study law *tend* to go in to law etc...



    OK, you have experience, you have qualifications, you go to a good uni, you have a good degree with a first etc... The starting wage is still around 25K and often they say we want you to have a 2:1 at least

    For the record, Cisco consider our uni (for the course offered) one of the best in the whole of Europe:
    http://www.staffs.ac.uk/undergraduat...uter_networks/

    And our graduates do get paid more at graduation (according to payscale) but it's more like an extra 2-3K, instead of an extra 10K more.

    It's definitely possible to get the average wage of 45K, but not straight after graduation. Maybe 6 months to 2 years after, but not straight after, unless you're lucky


    £30,000 starting for software developer IBM UK. On a 2:1 degree. At the rate I'm going, I will have a first. I'm sure it will increase.
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    (Original post by Upper Echelons)
    Cambridge graduate, 3 years of work, MBA, and then hired by an MBB consultancy firm in the States:
    A total of £125,000, aged 25 (basic £80,000 + signing/performance bonuses).
    This is a poor example because (i) you don't factor in the debt; (ii) 3 years of graduate experience is a bit on the short side (5 years is average at the London Business School, for instance).

    The easier way is just to join a bulge bracket investment bank and work there for 4 years. You'd definitely be pulling down more than £125,000 a year, assuming normal promotion speed.
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    For when I finish my course (this summer) and get a job: I would expect to be earning between £18k and £22k. That seems to be the salary range for many generic graduate jobs.
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    (Original post by Sagga)
    £30,000 starting for software developer IBM UK. On a 2:1 degree. At the rate I'm going, I will have a first. I'm sure it will increase.
    Fair point, but you can't rely on entering IBM. Seriously, most graduate roles are 25K. Let's say Cisco offer a good 5K more for interns than most companies. You can't rely on going for IBM
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    Rick Ross money.
 
 
 
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