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    (Original post by SophiaKeuning)
    That's the point! People aren't thinking about how horrible it its that kids died, and what a hideous individual, they're thinking 'HAH! I knew welfare culture is evil.' It's a perfect time to get people on the side of the Tories when as the Guardian clearly pointed out several days ago there will be a lot of unjust suffering caused by the cuts, and what a perfect motif is Philpott for their rampage against welfare.
    The media such as daily mail are pointing out the benefits. However, if you look at the comments, people are saying exactly what you're saying. Everyone's in disgust and they're crying for Mick to be hanged. (fat chance). I wouldn't say it's "unjust suffering" as Mick pointed out easy it was to abuse the system and refuse to work a day in their life. Yes, his crime against his children was outrageous but so is how he used his family to make an income.


    (Original post by pandabird)
    What are cash cows?
    But think about it logically...he's been sentenced for 7 years before on attempted murder, he's been done for common assault, taking drugs. Is he going to walk into a job? The government imprisons these people, and then gives them money, because it's the only way they can survive.

    And anyway, I agree with the above poster... The trial is all very good timing, a clever, underhand justification of the governments cuts me thinks.
    Cash cows are children or adults people use to make money. I.e. through prostitution. In this case, used through abusing the benefits system. If he cared for his kids he wouldn't have put them in the predicament and he wouldn't have gone on the lash, had a threesome and made sexual advances towards policewomen afterwards. i.e. he would have shown remorse, guilt and would have turned himself in.

    A person with a criminal record like he had would have had a fat chance getting a job. Then after 30 years, he got offered a minimum wage job (because of a tv show). Uhm.. He earned 60k on benefits, why would he walk into a 12k job? Pride? Dignity? He didn't give a **** about either. Maybe if he got into work short after prison, he wouldn't have been in this routine. Either way, he was bad news from the start. He prob wouldn't have had a job if he didn't have his criminal record. He was serving the army before he attempted manslaughter on the woman and he went AWOL. So that shows his motivation there.

    I agree with you, perfect timing. Mick is going to have his own way either way. He's going to make history because the welfare benefits will prob get cut and he'll be the reason why. And he's not going to be known for the right reasons either, he should be known as a disloyal, murderer but instead he's going to be known as a working class man who abused the benefits system and had it changed.
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    (Original post by Michaelj)
    The media such as daily mail are pointing out the benefits. However, if you look at the comments, people are saying exactly what you're saying. Everyone's in disgust and they're crying for Mick to be hanged. (fat chance). I wouldn't say it's "unjust suffering" as Mick pointed out easy it was to abuse the system and refuse to work a day in their life. Yes, his crime against his children was outrageous but so is how he used his family to make an income.

    No you're obviously unaware of what the cuts constitute and what I mean by unjust suffering. They could have made reforms so directed at areas where it's easy to abuse the system as there were very obvious flaws which indeed needed sorting out. However they have gone far deeper than that to the point where people will suffer. If you're unaware of what the cuts actually mean because it appears you are, then find out. There's a good article in the Guardian, entitled 'Benefits: Monday will be the day that defines this government' or something like that. If you read the point raised in that it's very clear that there's more to the cuts than just ensuring people don't abuse it. The fact that some people to provides a nice little excuse for slating into and ripping apart welfare.
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    (Original post by Jordan-James)
    Just gonna put this into perspective, someone could walk into your house and stab you to death, receiving less than 10 years in prison. Tell me how you would truly feel about that without lying.
    Good idea mate. When we want people to make rational decisions, we should try and make them as emotionally invested as possible.
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    I'm still not sure how 15 years is being classed as "got away with it" by so many people in this thread.

    That's either all of, if not the vast majority of the life most of the posters in this thread. Add to that you weren't really conscious of anything before the age of 3 or 4, and conscious of so little until you're about 9, it's equal to or above the actual "life" most people here have actually lived.

    People think about sentences in terms of numbers which isn't really how you should be thinking about it. "Oh it's only X number.

    15 years. Back to when I was 4. That's a massive amount of time to lose.
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    (Original post by Tpx)
    Good idea mate. When we want people to make rational decisions, we should try and make them as emotionally invested as possible.
    Whenever a welfare-apologist is challenged on the facts, those are the exact tactics they resort to.
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    I think, if the sentence for manslaughter is 15 years, then he should receive 6 of those sentences, so he gets 90 years.
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    (Original post by pandabird)
    What are cash cows?
    But think about it logically...he's been sentenced for 7 years before on attempted murder, he's been done for common assault, taking drugs. Is he going to walk into a job? The government imprisons these people, and then gives them money, because it's the only way they can survive.

    And anyway, I agree with the above poster... the trial is all very good timing, a clever, underhand justification of the governments cuts me thinks.
    I thought my position might be a little on the fringe. But I was just shocked to read your comments.

    If you really believe that the government is in anyway pleased or finds the barbaric murder of 6 children convenient, then you need to get your head examined my friend.
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    (Original post by TheMagicRat)
    I think, if the sentence for manslaughter is 15 years, then he should receive 6 of those sentences, so he gets 90 years.
    Life without parole would have been better, but I agree with this.
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    As a general reply to all the other posts above. I am quite upset to see how many people are sympathizing with Philpott here. Agreeing that its manslaughter, kidding yourself that he will do more than 15 years, saying that he needs rehabilitating etc etc is sympathizing with the man.

    The least this man deserves, is life without parole in complete isolation. But alas, he got a slap in the wrist and a trip to Butlins instead.
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    Terrible the way people are jumping on this awful case for political purposes.
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    (Original post by dj1015)
    Agreeing that its manslaughter
    Unless you believe he intended to kill them (or cause GBH), he didn't commit murder. He's a lowlife, but you can't charge him with murder just because of that. That's not our law.
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    (Original post by dj1015)
    As a general reply to all the other posts above. I am quite upset to see how many people are sympathizing with Philpott here. Agreeing that its manslaughter, kidding yourself that he will do more than 15 years, saying that he needs rehabilitating etc etc is sympathizing with the man.

    The least this man deserves, is life without parole in complete isolation. But alas, he got a slap in the wrist and a trip to Butlins instead.
    Looking at the cold hard facts of this case and determining that it fits the standard definition of manslaughter, as well as having little belief in him being able to get out after 15 years is sympathising with him? What?
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    (Original post by dj1015)
    Life without parole would have been better, but I agree with this.
    I'm no expert in sentencing law, but I have a feeling life without parole is not an option for manslaughter.

    Secondly, his sentence does not mean 'he will be out in 15 years', it means in 15 years he can apply for parole. I somehow doubt he will get it.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Terrible the way people are jumping on this awful case for political purposes.
    I agree. Its very sad and tragic about what has happened, but the opportunity to discuss the symptoms of what happened and how they can remedied for other people and the greater benefit of society should not be passed over.
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    (Original post by flying plum)
    I'm no expert in sentencing law, but I have a feeling life without parole is not an option for manslaughter.

    Secondly, his sentence does not mean 'he will be out in 15 years', it means in 15 years he can apply for parole. I somehow doubt he will get it.
    In the same post you stated that you were not an expert of law, and then you proceed to cast your opinion about his chances of getting parole after 15 years.

    #irony.
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    (Original post by dj1015)
    In the same post you stated that you were not an expert of law, and then you proceed to cast your opinion about his chances of getting parole after 15 years.

    #irony.
    I said I wasn't an expert. I didn't say I knew nothing. And I do doubt that he will get parole after his minimum term - it is just an opinion, but from what I've read in the press over the last few days, he doesn't seem like a man who is able to show genuine remorse. His ego is a million miles wide.
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    15 years is ****ing hard time man. It's not a life sentence or a death penalty, but it's still gonna seem like an eternity to him.
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    (Original post by coconut2456)
    Looking at the cold hard facts of this case and determining that it fits the standard definition of manslaughter, as well as having little belief in him being able to get out after 15 years is sympathising with him? What?
    I have looked and read (not just the Mail btw), and came to the perfectly logical conclusion that a man driven by greed and pure unadulterated selfishness, planned to burn his house down. Then hoped by chance that someone else would be around to pull his kids out of the building he just set of fire.

    I am fully aware that he did not consciously intend to kill 6 people. However by his utter negligence in his hateful and disgusting act, he murdered them. Plain and simple.

    It might not count as murder under our current law, but I am saying the law needs changing. So that cases like this are counted as murder and so that animals can be caged for life (which means life from the word go) or worse.
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    (Original post by slickrick666999)
    15 years of getting arse wallopped by all the bullys.
    According to this prisons expert, he will end up in 'Monster Mansions' (Wakefield Prison), where amongst others Harold Shipman and Ian Huntley have spent time.
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/20...risoner-rivals
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    (Original post by Smartcook)
    OP Do you believe that all who claim any benefit are workshy/lazy etc??


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I believe that if someone truly wants work they will get it. It may not be well paid, but they'll get a job they have earned and deserve.
 
 
 
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