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    (Original post by Popppppy)
    Going by the Guardian's league table this would result in closing down both universities in Northern Ireland, meaning those who don't want to/can't afford to travel across to England/Wales/Scotland cannot access higher education.

    Where would Northern Ireland get Doctors, Nurses, Lawyers, Engineers, any graduates for that matter?
    India and Bangladesh ?
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    I've been to University of East London (115), and King's College London (18).

    UEL was better.

    The differences between universities are not as big as people like to think.
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    (Original post by TobaccoSmoke)
    League tables. They're usually very accurate and respected by top employers.
    *******s mate, league tables mean nothing. They have their set of flaws.
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    Regarding "no prospects if you go to an ex-poly"...

    According to UniStats for "engineering", a Cambridge student has an 89% course satisfaction. A place like Coventry attracts a 95% satisfaction for an "engineering" course.

    Average Cambridge graduate salary after 6 months: £26,000
    Average Coventry graduate salary after 6 months: £34,000
    90% of Cambridge graduates carry on to work or study
    100% of Coventry graduates carry on to work or study

    There's also roughly 30% more satisfaction regarding the Students' Union at Coventry compared to Cambridge.


    Now I would hope that UniStats is slightly more reliable in some areas than a newspapers' league table. This is of course not a trend for all "lower quality" universities, but it's not as if all ex-polys are worthless pieces of crap.
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    UCL needs to be shut down, the godless scum across the river!!!!! It's a disgrace that they are allowed to remain open.
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    I generally agree with you. Maybe keep a few more than 40 universities and also I don't think we should base it purely on league tables as they can be a bit wishy-washy. But nowadays, it seems like every Tom, **** and Harry has a degree whether even if they are not necessarily 'academic' type people because they are able to get into universities on lower grades. It's no wonder degrees have lost a lot of their value!
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    I'm not sure how the top 40 would be established. The rankings vary massively in some cases between the different tables and they don't stay constant each year moreover some universities perform in certain subjects whereas others are good all rounders, so it's pretty stupid to think you can whittle down 100+ universities into 40. With that said, I think you should probably reconsider whether you should actually be going...
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    (Original post by JKDP)
    I really disagree with you! I'm have applied to study Primary Education and the best courses for this are often provided by universities way below the top 40! If you got rid of all of these universities, future teachers wouldn't receive the best possible training which would put children at a major disadvantage!!
    This. Lower unis offer courses such as teaching or nursing that the higher unis don't always offer. Where would you got to study if all the lower unis were shut down?
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    (Original post by TheGuy117)
    UCL needs to be shut down, the godless scum across the river!!!!! It's a disgrace that they are allowed to remain open.
    -> butthurt because you got rejected by UCL
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    (Original post by Jodie_668)
    I generally agree with you. Maybe keep a few more than 40 universities and also I don't think we should base it purely on league tables as they can be a bit wishy-washy. But nowadays, it seems like every Tom, **** and Harry has a degree whether even if they are not necessarily 'academic' type people because they are able to get into universities on lower grades. It's no wonder degrees have lost a lot of their value!
    if you're keen on reducing student numbers, why do it by shutting entire unis rather than taking a look at the proportion of the student body doing humanities courses? The reasons usually given by politicians for expanding HE in the past - preparing the uk for the high tech, knowledge based economy of the future etc. don't match with what has been allowed to happen... an explosion of places on humanities and social science courses.
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    Improvements and considerations can always be made when it comes to universities, but surely whatever ranking the university has if the student desperately wants to achieve they will no matter what university!
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    Definitely not top 40, I would say top 80-90. The universities at the bottom should become specialist education institutions or become new Secondary or Primary schools like in London where they require more.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    if you're keen on reducing student numbers, why do it by shutting entire unis rather than taking a look at the proportion of the student body doing humanities courses? The reasons usually given by politicians for expanding HE in the past - preparing the uk for the high tech, knowledge based economy of the future etc. don't match with what has been allowed to happen... an explosion of places on humanities and social science courses.
    Yes, that is a good point but I think that both reducing the student numbers for certain course and reducing the number of universities would be good. I just think that people should play to their strengths and it seems like everyone nowadays just goes to university, not because they enjoy academic work and get really good grades, but because it's just the norm and many less reputable universities will let them in on lower grades. That's not to say there is no hope for them after school because less money spent on universities would enables more funding for apprenticeships and work placements, which will also be necessary for our future.
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    (Original post by TobaccoSmoke)
    If only the top 40 best universities remained open that means only the most academically able applicants would ever get a place and the cost to the tax payer would be far less to run the universities.

    Also, with far less universities, the UK might be able to reinstate free tuition.
    Thank god that you're not the Chancellor of the Exchequer, otherwise you would have destroyed the UK economy.
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    Well on the Independent Uni guide (as an example) the 41st ranked University is Brunel.

    Joe Brand and Lee Mack went there and they're hilarious.

    So did several MPs, Ross Brawn (Mercedes f1 Team Principal), Audley Harrison (Boxer).

    But **** their lives right?
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    Universities outside of the top 40, actually produce some important people into society.....just look at the national health service!
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    Less universities is an exceptional idea, but the criteria for closing them down you've suggested is horrendous.

    It's true we have too many students, and it's true we have too many degrees that are costing taxpayer money and not leading to taxpayer benefit through better employment options for students.

    This isn't the fault of students.

    This is the fault of years of government propaganda and policy. For years, we've been told that we have to go to university. For years, we've been told that if we don't, we'll end up unemployed or earn so much less. This has lead to too many people going to university and a devaluation of the degree.

    A lot of these people are doing courses that give little taxpayer benefit, too - humanities and social science courses mostly. We have a lack of physicists and an abundance of literature graduates, for example.

    Alongside this, there has been a massive devaluation of 'vocational' courses. People think that these courses are beneath them. Why? Because there is so much emphasis on academic intelligence and not enough on practical intelligence.

    A good plumber, electrician, builder, joiner, metalworker etc can make bloody good money running their own business or working for a company. Yet, a BTEC in Electrical Engineering or Plumbing is seen as a 'thick' route - it's obviously much cleverer to go to your local polytechnic and do a course that gives you absolutely no job skills.

    This is of course, rather hypocritical of me, given my degree. I know there is little to no need for my degree in the job market. My degree won't get me a job unless it's a job based on social research or relations, and given that those jobs - in this economic climate - are rarely than rocking horse sh*te, I don't see one coming my way.

    So yes, we should shut some universities down. We should shut some courses down, but not on the criteria you specify. League tables are pointless. League tables are useless. The mark of a good university is quality teaching and quality research output, not student satisfaction or percentage of graduates who complete their course.
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    (Original post by ilickbatteries)
    Less universities is an exceptional idea, but the criteria for closing them down you've suggested is horrendous.

    It's true we have too many students, and it's true we have too many degrees that are costing taxpayer money and not leading to taxpayer benefit through better employment options for students.

    This isn't the fault of students.

    This is the fault of years of government propaganda and policy. For years, we've been told that we have to go to university. For years, we've been told that if we don't, we'll end up unemployed or earn so much less. This has lead to too many people going to university and a devaluation of the degree.

    A lot of these people are doing courses that give little taxpayer benefit, too - humanities and social science courses mostly. We have a lack of physicists and an abundance of literature graduates, for example.

    Alongside this, there has been a massive devaluation of 'vocational' courses. People think that these courses are beneath them. Why? Because there is so much emphasis on academic intelligence and not enough on practical intelligence.

    A good plumber, electrician, builder, joiner, metalworker etc can make bloody good money running their own business or working for a company. Yet, a BTEC in Electrical Engineering or Plumbing is seen as a 'thick' route - it's obviously much cleverer to go to your local polytechnic and do a course that gives you absolutely no job skills.

    This is of course, rather hypocritical of me, given my degree. I know there is little to no need for my degree in the job market. My degree won't get me a job unless it's a job based on social research or relations, and given that those jobs - in this economic climate - are rarely than rocking horse sh*te, I don't see one coming my way.

    So yes, we should shut some universities down. We should shut some courses down, but not on the criteria you specify. League tables are pointless. League tables are useless. The mark of a good university is quality teaching and quality research output, not student satisfaction or percentage of graduates who complete their course.
    May I ask what degree you have?
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    (Original post by TobaccoSmoke)
    If only the top 40 best universities remained open that means only the most academically able applicants would ever get a place and the cost to the tax payer would be far less to run the universities.

    Also, with far less universities, the UK might be able to reinstate free tuition.
    The ridiculous target of sending 50% of young people to university should be seen for what it was anyway - a ruse to get young people off the unemployment figures for a few years. The graduate job market is absolutely saturated. And when they leave all they have is a sense of entitlement that they deserve a graduate job and think low-skilled jobs are beneath them OR employers may not want to take them on because they are "over-qualified"
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    (Original post by Authority_Song)
    Well on the Independent Uni guide (as an example) the 41st ranked University is Brunel.

    Joe Brand and Lee Mack went there and they're hilarious.

    So did several MPs, Ross Brawn (Mercedes f1 Team Principal), Audley Harrison (Boxer).

    But **** their lives right?
    Hahaha. I would have repped you but I'm all out for today, sorry. This is brilliant.
 
 
 
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