Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Europa192)
    Thank you! That's a big help, I always get stuck on questions about improving experiments. You must have been over the moon when you saw this experiment on the pre release

    Well Im actually in year 13 and cant really remember much of the experiment but yeah pretty pleased although dont really see what could be asked about the 3rd part :/ but no worries message me if you need help!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi could someone please give me a hand with the graph questions which always appear at the very start of the paper? Is there an actual method or is it guess work? Thanks :l I'm really stuck!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joynzer)
    Hi could someone please give me a hand with the graph questions which always appear at the very start of the paper? Is there an actual method or is it guess work? Thanks :l I'm really stuck!
    you have to look at the equation involving the 2 given variables

    eg: if it's a speed-time graph it'll be a y=mx+c graph as the equation linking the variables speed and time is linear.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    The pre release says that the equation v^2=u^2+2as can be used to determine the value for g.
    Would you simply find a using the equation for each angle then because a=gsintheta you could plot a graph with a on the y axis and sintheta on the x axis and the gradient would be g? Is this a method they would accept?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Does anyone know whats in the formula booklet ?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Monk)
    Does anyone know whats in the formula booklet ?
    Formulas? I think. Not sure though.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Which formulas do we need to know that aren't in the formula booklet?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by m00c0w)
    Which formulas do we need to know that aren't in the formula booklet?
    Well the main formula that springs to mind is the x=Llambda/d to calculate fringe spacing. There are a few others such as kinetic energy (E=1/2mv^2) and F=ma. I think thats pretty much it, but there are probably a few others but most likely very generic and you'll probably know them by heart already.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by m00c0w)
    Which formulas do we need to know that aren't in the formula booklet?
    These are the one's I'm thinking (Some are simple, I know):
    Double slit experiment: S=(lambda*L)/w (x/L) = tan(Theta) ≈ sin(Theta) ≈ Theta
    Single aperture: For a min: dsin(theta) = lambda
    Beam width: Theta(in radians)= lambda/d
    Misc: W=fd, P=Fv, P ɑ A^2, Intensity ɑ A^2
    Sensitivity = (change of output)/(change of input)
    Resolution = Smallest observable change
    Accuracy = (resolution)/(sensitivity)

    Let me know if nothing makes sense
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Also some questions from my physics dept:
    http://puu.sh/38deP.jpg
    http://puu.sh/38dfX.jpg
    http://puu.sh/38dgC.jpg

    (Sorry for low-res, my internet is appalling, I'll put up the general notes in one sec)
    Attached Images
     
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ArchieL)
    These are the one's I'm thinking (Some are simple, I know):
    Double slit experiment: S=(lambda*L)/w (x/L) = tan(Theta) ≈ sin(Theta) ≈ Theta
    Single aperture: For a min: dsin(theta) = lambda
    Beam width: Theta(in radians)= lambda/d
    Misc: W=fd, P=Fv, P ɑ A^2, Intensity ɑ A^2
    Sensitivity = (change of output)/(change of input)
    Resolution = Smallest observable change
    Accuracy = (resolution)/(sensitivity)

    Let me know if nothing makes sense
    We've already got lambda=dsin(theta), W=fx, P=fv, but thanks for the others
    How would you calculate resolution? What is beam width? I don't remember being taught it nor seeing it in past papers.
    So the main one we really need to know is S=(Lambda*L)/w (which is S and which is w?)

    Thanks again!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bloxorus)
    Well the main formula that springs to mind is the x=Llambda/d to calculate fringe spacing. There are a few others such as kinetic energy (E=1/2mv^2) and F=ma. I think thats pretty much it, but there are probably a few others but most likely very generic and you'll probably know them by heart already.
    Thank you! Could you remind me which is x, and which is d? I always forget! Another one I remembered is Gravitational Potential energy=mgh.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by walkers38)
    What did you guys get in G493? The practical. I got 17/20
    19/20, 29/30 overall
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I got 20/20 and either 8 or 9/10 (don't know why it was so low, seeing as I had to describe some pretty high level physics)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by m00c0w)
    We've already got lambda=dsin(theta), W=fx, P=fv, but thanks for the others
    How would you calculate resolution? What is beam width? I don't remember being taught it nor seeing it in past papers.
    So the main one we really need to know is S=(Lambda*L)/w (which is S and which is w?)

    Thanks again!
    Haha, sorry for that- it'll teach me to reply in a hurry!

    In the case of the graph we're given, I'm guessing it's 4mV/Degree (smallest observable change => one square)

    'Beam' width is the estimated spread of the fringes from the single slit experiment. It's basically a boil-down of din(theta)=lambda, as sin(theta) = theta at small angles. It's easy to do quick calculations on and have used it in most past papers I've done.

    Finally, for a two-slit experiment:
    Lambda = wavelength of coherent source
    L = Distance of screen from aperture
    W = slit width (d in other formula)
    S = fringe separation

    Lambda = (ws)/L
    => s = (Lambda*L)/W

    So:
    Increasing wavelength increases s
    Increasing L increases s
    Increasing W decreases s

    Also make sure you remember the key energy equations and stuff (though you should know them already!):
    E = 1/2mv^2 = mgh = Fd
    These come up quite a bit, and can confuse!
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by m00c0w)
    Thank you! Could you remind me which is x, and which is d? I always forget! Another one I remembered is Gravitational Potential energy=mgh.
    X is the fringe spacing on the screen and d is the slit spacing. Yeah GPE is another, theres a few more like that but they are very basic i.e. sensitivity=gradient of line etc.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    One thing I haven't seen in a little while is a question about standing waves in pipes? Please correct me if I'm wrong, but:

    Closed at both ends: Nodes at both ends.
    Open at one end: Antinode at open end, node at closed end.
    Open at both ends: Antinode at both ends.

    Can we just work from there?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    String. NAN
    Open pipe: ANA
    Open at one end: AN
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    30/30 In G493 and 83/90 UMS in G491. I did a lot more for G491 than this module. I'm scared.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Is this anyone's last exam? Mine is. I'm so unmotivated for this. Argh
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.