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"Scon" or "Scone"? watch

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    Scon
    45.10%
    Scone
    54.90%

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    (Original post by Kaiser MacCleg)
    Scon. Like gone and one, not cone and tone.


    English and logic don't mix.
    You pronounce scone like one? Scun?
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    There is a place near where I live called "Scone". It's pronounced scoone. Strangely I pronounce scone, as in the foodstuff, scon.
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    I work in a tea room in devon it's scon mix, as in its not made yet, and it's just the flower and butter and stuff, but once it's cooked a done its a scone


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    (Original post by tjf8)
    You pronounce scone like one? Scun?
    For me, one sounds like scone, but one doesn't sound like won, gun or fun.

    So no, not "scun".

    You say "wun too three"?
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    (Original post by Kaiser MacCleg)
    You say "wun too three"?
    Of course – I didn't realise there was an alternative!

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    reading "wun" reminded me of this:

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    (Original post by tjf8)
    Of course – I didn't realise there was an alternative!

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    reading "wun" reminded me of this:

    Nor did I! My "one" has a very pronounced "O" in it.
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    From Wikipedia:

    The pronunciation of the word within the United Kingdom varies. According to one academic study, two-thirds of the British population pronounce it /ˈskɒn/ with the preference rising to 99% in the Scottish population. This is also the pronunciation of Australians, Canadians and New Zealanders. Other regions, particularly the United States and Ireland, pronounce the word as /ˈskoʊn/. The pronunciation /ˈskʊn/ is also used, particularly in Ireland. British dictionaries usually show the "con" form as the preferred pronunciation, while recognising that the "cone" form also exists.[1]
    The difference in pronunciation is alluded to in the poem which contains the lines:

    "I asked the maid in dulcet tone
    To order me a buttered scone
    The silly girl has been and gone
    And ordered me a buttered scone."

    The Oxford English Dictionary reports that the first mention of the word was in 1513. Origin of the word scone is obscure and may, in fact, derive from different sources. That is, the classic Scottish scone which, according to Sheila MacNiven Cameron in The Highlander's Cookbook, originated as a bannock cut into pieces; and the Dutch schoonbrood or "spoonbread" (very similar to the drop scone); and possibly other, similar and similarly named quick breads, may have made their way onto the British tea table, where their similar names merged into one.

    Thus, scone may derive from the Middle Dutch schoonbrood (fine white bread), from schoon (pure, clean) and brood (bread).[2] And/or it may also derive from the Scots Gaelic term "sgonn" meaning a shapeless mass or large mouthful. The Middle Low German term "Schönbrot" meaning fine bread may also have played a role in the origination of this word. And if the mythology put forward by Sheila MacNiven Cameron be true, the word may also be based on the town of Scone, Scotland, the ancient capital of that country -- where Scottish monarchs were still crowned even after the capital was moved to Perth, then to Edinburgh; on whose Scone Stone the monarchs of Great Britain and the United Kingdom are still crowned today.
    The study mentioned:

    http://virtuallinguist.typepad.com/t...-of-scone.html

    Anyway, it's 'scon' (to rhyme with 'gone') for me. I live in Yorkshire (although my accent would definitely be classed as Southern up here - read "posh" if you're from Yorkshire ), and I've heard both pronunciations used by people of all manner of backgrounds.
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    (Original post by NotMyToothbrush)
    Does it matter?
    Just turn it upside down if you're not happy :yes:

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    Nah you got to cut in half and then cream and jam each half so both sides of the scone are covered in cream, I do have a serious cream addiction.
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    Scone
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    Usually scon, but sometimes I use scone to spice things up.
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    Some people I know who say Scon refer to scone as being too posh, but imo they can both be made to sound really posh I think
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    (Original post by HeadintheClouds93)
    Scon.

    Wonder if it varies depending on where you are from? I'm from the north east, and to be fair I've never got onto the subject really. My mam says scon too though.
    I actually think it's great when someone uses the word 'mam'. Us northerners don't use mum (or at least not where I am from). Hate buying a mothers day card saying 'mum' haha.

    Scon.
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    Tomayto tomarto.
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    Scone.
    I dont know if its just me, but i always think scon sounds posh.
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    I'd say it was the other way around. I'm from the North East so I say Scon, but to me Scone seems really posh, especially if you imagine it spoken with a broad Southern accent.
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    Scon.

    The amount of arguments me and my friends have about whether is should be "scon" or "scone" is unbelievable though.
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    (Original post by Rainbows!)
    I actually think it's great when someone uses the word 'mam'. Us northerners don't use mum (or at least not where I am from). Hate buying a mothers day card saying 'mum' haha.

    Scon.
    Haha yay! My uni mates allll say mum, and yep I hate buying the cards saying mum :')
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    (Original post by HeadintheClouds93)
    Haha yay! My uni mates allll say mum, and yep I hate buying the cards saying mum :')
    Glad to see someone else agrees
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    Scon. And I'm from Yorkshire. I believe it's a northern thing, as that is where the hard vowel sound originates, hence us saying bath and not Barth. However some of my deluded friends believe the opposite, I dunno, I suppose it's an argument that will never be won


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    (Original post by Stevo F)
    So by that logic you would pronounce "gone" the same way?
    No but you would pronounce cone which closer in terms of spelling
 
 
 
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