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Does anyone really like Shakespeare? And if so, which is your favourite? Watch

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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Titus Andronicus, because it's so gory and grotesque, and the language is so weirdly artificial. The one I can't stand is Merchant of Venice because all of the characters are so slap-worthy.

    Interestingly, Tamburlaine is the play that may not actually be by Marlowe. It wasn't attributed to him until the 19th century (by someone with a bit of a history of making dodgy attributions and falsifying documents in order to support his points). It could still be by him, of course, but it's hard to be certain either way. Authorship attribution's quite a fascinating subject, but even with the use of computers - and they've been put to this sort of use since the 1960s! - we're still a way off being able to determine actual stylistic 'fingerprints' for individual authors.

    [Sorry about the boring digression; I just happen to have done a bit of reading on that subject]
    Not boring at all - very interesting, in fact. Who are suggested authors?
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    (Original post by aspirinpharmacist)
    I'm trying really hard to convince myself it's not sexist, and I do see what you mean about Bianca, I never liked her, she's clearly a very manipulative little character and I always figured that Katherina's anger at the beginning of the play was because nobody realises that her sister isn't as sweet and innocent as everyone supposes, and she's annoyed that everyone falls for her act.
    Oh it is most definitely sexist but at the time when it was written, sexism was common and accepted by society. Hell, even the women were OK with it! And I thought that Katherina's anger came from her father's obvious affection for the 'more beautiful' daughter (however, if you've seen the Elizabeth Taylor film, Katherina is so much more attractive) and that it all stemmed from jealousy and isolation.
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    Hamlet :love:
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    (Original post by Felix1944)
    Not boring at all - very interesting, in fact. Who are suggested authors?
    John Webster has definitely been suggested, but other than that I don't remember. The articles I read weren't really concerned with identifying the author of the play, though.
    Plus of course Tamburlaine need not even be the work of a single author. Lots of early modern plays were written collaboratively. As a matter of fact (to get back to the original topic of this thread), there are a number of plays we're used to thinking of as Shakespeare's that actually have more than one author.
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    plays are meant to be WATCHED not READ. i found reading shakespeare at school mind numbingly boring, however i don't see why that is suprprising. imagine reading the play script of lord of the rings or harry potter! you'd hate that too!

    also, a lot of pretence in this thread.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    John Webster has definitely been suggested, but other than that I don't remember. The articles I read weren't really concerned with identifying the author of the play, though.
    Plus of course Tamburlaine need not even be the work of a single author. Lots of early modern plays were written collaboratively. As a matter of fact (to get back to the original topic of this thread), there are a number of plays we're used to thinking of as Shakespeare's that actually have more than one author.
    Thanks for taking the trouble with this.
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    (Original post by paperstainedink)
    Henry IV Part 1 and Henry V are my absolute favourites, with Macbeth following. I love the humour in the Henry plays, and the transformation Hal goes through in becoming king. They are just beautifully written plays.

    And there are a fair few sonnets which I adore too
    Yes! I love the whole disappointed father/son thing going on, even though they're royal, they're really just so ordinary.
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    (Original post by aspirinpharmacist)
    Yes! I love the whole disappointed father/son thing going on, even though they're royal, they're really just so ordinary.
    If you want a lighter take on the whole royal yet human family thing you might like Bennett's TMOGIII
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    (Original post by paperstainedink)
    Henry IV Part 1 and Henry V are my absolute favourites, with Macbeth following. I love the humour in the Henry plays, and the transformation Hal goes through in becoming king. They are just beautifully written plays.

    And there are a fair few sonnets which I adore too
    I agree, but it's a shame about IV Part 2, that's definitely one of his weakest in my opinion.
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    Othello

    Simply because I sort of connected with him as a character and couldn't help see that I had similar traits.

    Its always weird when that happens.
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    Twelfth Night
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    Doing GCSE english made me hate Shakespeare, particularly Romeo and Juliet. Discuss act 3 scene 1 The death of Tybalt as a turning point in the play.

    I really like Shakespeare now, particularly his comedies as there are some traveling threatre groups that visit near me in summer and they're great.

    Of his more serious work I like Henry IV part II. Especially the BBC version starting Jeremy Irons and Tom Hiddelston that was on a few months ago, the final scene with those two in the throne room was amazing.
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    Iago has to be my favourite character, hands down. I cant say the same about Othello as a whole though. Honestly Iago makes the entire play for me. I feel that he's so good (at being evil) that the play wouldn't be that much without his malignant, pushing-the-fourth-wall presence.

    Lots of folks here have said the latter plays of the Henriad, but Richard II is where it's at for me. It's just so damn good. I mean, it deals with the incredibly potent issue and historical event of a legitimate monarch actually being deposed. The whole succession question was such a huge issue during Elizabeth I's reign, as she produced no heirs and her grandfather came to the throne via the Battle of Bosworth Field, that I'm pretty sure she actually had Parliament pass an Act banning public discussion of it. And this play pretty much confronts it head on right at the end of her time on the throne. It's just stunning. Plus there are so many great speeches - John of Gaunt's "Methinks I am a prophet new inspired" being the highlight - and stunning moments such as when Richard is forced to come down from Flint Castle to meet Bolinbroke... yeah. Just read it. Honestly.

    Also, someone mentioned Webster. Man The Duchess of Malfi creeped the bejeezus out of me. What is Ferdinand's description of his lycanthropy? "Like hair, but on the inside"...?
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    (Original post by tjf8)
    I agree, but it's a shame about IV Part 2, that's definitely one of his weakest in my opinion.
    It's been a while since I read it, but as far as I remember I quite liked that one, actually. It's quite clever how the play manages to legitimise young Henry as a 'real prince' and future ruler and pretty much makes you forget that as a usurper's son his claim to the throne is really every bit as shaky as his father's.
    I also found Falstaff an incredibly tedious character, so maybe that's another reason why I preferred Part 2.:dontknow:
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    Yes, I love reading/watching Shakespeare for enjoyment and study. I did my uni dissertation on Julius Caesar, Anthony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus.

    I also really like Richard III and Macbeth.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    It's been a while since I read it, but as far as I remember I quite liked that one, actually. It's quite clever how the play manages to legitimise young Henry as a 'real prince' and future ruler and pretty much makes you forget that as a usurper's son his claim to the throne is really every bit as shaky as his father's.
    I also found Falstaff an incredibly tedious character, so maybe that's another reason why I preferred Part 2.:dontknow:
    Well I've not read it, I've only seen a tv adaptation, and Falstaff was really well played so perhaps it was the acting :dontknow: I did appreciate the way Henry matures through it though; it's definitely better if you watch/read it soon after Part 1 for that reason.

    This thread is making me want to go away and read some more
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    I love Shakespeare

    The Henry VI trilogy and Richard III are my favourite plays.

    I think more people would enjoy Shakespeare if they saw a play first, rather than reading the text in an English class. We did Romeo and Juliet when I was at school, and I still can't stand that play!

    If anyone is interested in going to see some Shakespeare, the RSC do £5 tickets for 16 to 25 year olds. It is well worth it as the productions are usually very well done.
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    (Original post by WhyteBoar)
    I think more people would enjoy Shakespeare if they saw a play first, rather than reading the text in an English class. We did Romeo and Juliet when I was at school, and I still can't stand that play!
    In all fairness, just about everything is ruined by being forced to read it in class!
    I'm not a huge fan of Romeo and Juliet either, but I like the way the mood of the play completely shifts after the first death. Up to that point, it basically works exactly like a comedy, even though you already know through the prologue that everything will end badly.
    Edit: Regarding the 'seeing a play first' bit, a few years ago I went to a production of Romeo and Juliet whose audience mainly consisted of two student groups (who seemed to really enjoy the performance) and one elderly couple who had clearly forgotten that the play is full of rude jokes. During the interval I heard one of them say in a slightly shocked voice 'I didn't remember Shakespeare being so bawdy'.
    If anyone is interested in going to see some Shakespeare, the RSC do £5 tickets for 16 to 25 year olds. It is well worth it as the productions are usually very well done.
    :ditto: to all of that. Though I think you can't book the £5 tickets in advance, so if you don't live near Stratford and are able to turn up on the day, it's not that easy to arrange. Even the normal tickets are quite reasonably priced, though (unless you absolutely have to have seats in the highest band).
    They also do great workshops for student groups over at the Shakespeare Centre.
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    They have a new thing called 'RSC Key':

    http://www.rsc.org.uk/support-us/key/

    Not sure if that enables advanced bookings for the 16-25 deal? I guess it depends somewhat on the production as well.

    Back in 2007 my friend managed to get two completely free tickets in the stalls to Henry VI part III, back when the RSC were doing the histories cycle. What an amazing production that was, and it didn't cost us a penny. I think I went to see all of those plays about five times each.

    It is worth keeping an eye on their website for any deals.
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    (Original post by WhyteBoar)
    They have a new thing called 'RSC Key':

    http://www.rsc.org.uk/support-us/key/

    Not sure if that enables advanced bookings for the 16-25 deal? I guess it depends somewhat on the production as well.
    It's not terribly clear from the description, but it looks as though it does. Pity they didn't introduce this much earlier!:p:
 
 
 
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