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If your born deaf, what language do you think in? Watch

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    I'm really interested as to how they teach deaf people to drive. I know from when I'm learning that there is a lot of communication that happens when you have to focus your eyes on the road. Also, what do they do about the inability to hear car horns?


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    It's an interesting debate that is more or less at the heart of the whole field of linguistics. It's not strictly true to say that deaf people prove that you don't have to have language to form thoughts, because deaf people have sign language. Even before sign language was formalised, language was presumably acquired within the family via ad hoc signing.

    It is difficult to separate language acquisition from socialisation. It is certainly true that a neglected child cannot properly acquire language, particularly past the age of 7.

    While the idea that language can shape thought has been a big no-no in linguistics since the Whorf controversy, I believe there's a body of research that indicates that we do think "in" our language. But whether that language is a prerequisite for forming those complex thoughts is not clear.

    I rather tend towards the usual view that words are representations of objects, states, actions which we are primed, due to biological instinct and then by observational reinforcement, to recognise as unitary wholes, e.g. "rabbit", "run", "scared".

    However when it comes to certain more abstract concepts like "right-wing" and "left-wing", they are the ones that can to some extent form thoughts because you might think of Hitler and Stalin as opposites when really they were both authoritarians who only differed on the economy. If you are subjected to words like this, you are likely to interpret them in an unhelpful way in your mind until such time as someone points out how the words are misleading.
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    (Original post by TheGoonerGirl)
    Before I had my hearing-aids, I had very little experience of sound. I could only hear people shouting or vehicles outside my home. I was about 10 when I got my hearing-aids. Sound terrified me and it still does now.
    TheGoonerGirl, can I ask, before you experienced sound for the first time, did you feel that you were still living life to the full, because it was impossible for you to imagine any better?

    I always ask myself whenever I see a deaf or blind person, 'What sort of a life does this person have? It must be infuriating for them, being deprived of a sense that plays such a HUGE part in the lives of those of us with 5 senses!'

    But a friend of mine raised a hypothetical situation where some of us have a sixth sense - telepathy - and because telepathy is something they use all the time, these people ask themselves exactly what I ask myself about you guys in the deaf community: 'What sort of a life do these people without the sense of telepathy have? We use it all the time and it's the source of so much of our enjoyment!' I thought what my friend said was genius. What do you think?? Is it the same sort of thing, would you say??
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    Do blind people dream?
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    (Original post by Finella)
    Assuming you had some other means of language acquisition (eg. reading), whichever language you acquire that way?

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    But if you have never heard the written word being spoken, how will you know how it sounds?
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    (Original post by TheGoonerGirl)
    Well, deaf people would have special alarm clocks to wake them up. You can get types that flash very bright light or those with a vibrator (please don't take the piss out of me for saying this) which goes underneath the pillows and vibrates at the set time. I have one of these. It never fails to scare the living daylights out of me each morning.
    why not turn you phone on vibration? that's what I do, I'm not deaf but I hate the sound of alarm clocks...


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    I know someone who is deaf and I asked her this ages ago. She thinks in pictures and colours, interestingly.

    I am not deaf, but as well as thinking in words I actually think in patterns quite a lot. Like, if i'm thinking back to a university topic, I would never talk to myself about what I was writing, I would remember the patters of the colours and text on the page and it would jog my memory.:dontknow:
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    (Original post by CheeseMunchies)
    Just all ways puzzled me. I guess there head are silent and its visual.
    My younger brother went deaf before he was one and invented his own spoken language even though he couldn't hear
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    It is an interesting subject. Think of being deaf and blind at the same time. I am also curious as to how one goes about that. Surely a lot of communication must be through feeling?
    There's something called deafblind sign language. (or signing) You "draw" the signs on the persons hand.
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    (Original post by CheeseMunchies)
    Just all ways puzzled me. I guess there head are silent and its visual.
    It occurred to me, what do blind people think about when they masturbate?
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    (Original post by AlexandrTheGreat)
    It occurred to me, what do blind people think about when they masturbate?
    I know a fully-sighted person who is more turned on by sound than sight, and will listen to recordings of people having sex rather than watching porn. So maybe that?

    (And, no, I'm not talking about myself.)
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    (Original post by TheGoonerGirl)
    No, it's fine, they're not sensitive questions at all.

    I got my first ever hearing aids when I was about 9/10 years old. Before then, I could only pretty much hear only vehicles outside or people shouting but it was very faint. I recognise words but I only think in images which do have different meanings.
    so if you're thinking "i don't like this person, why are they being so nasty to me" or "i really want to go to the beach"... how do you think that? or especially at school for example when writing an essay in english or trying to understand something in chemistry that you can't quite understand and you are just figuring it out in your brain?
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    (Original post by raaachek)
    TheGoonerGirl, can I ask, before you experienced sound for the first time, did you feel that you were still living life to the full, because it was impossible for you to imagine any better?

    I always ask myself whenever I see a deaf or blind person, 'What sort of a life does this person have? It must be infuriating for them, being deprived of a sense that plays such a HUGE part in the lives of those of us with 5 senses!'

    But a friend of mine raised a hypothetical situation where some of us have a sixth sense - telepathy - and because telepathy is something they use all the time, these people ask themselves exactly what I ask myself about you guys in the deaf community: 'What sort of a life do these people without the sense of telepathy have? We use it all the time and it's the source of so much of our enjoyment!' I thought what my friend said was genius. What do you think?? Is it the same sort of thing, would you say??
    well it's like snakes have the infrared sense or at least they can "see" in heat... or those mantis shrimp things can see way more colours than us... i don't feel frustrated about either of those things. curious about what it must be like... but i don't feel a burning disappointment like something is missing from my life..

    must be slightly different for deaf people though as sound is a big part of how we communicate, you family, your friends etc. our world is adapted for sound..
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    (Original post by Fleurie)
    well it's like snakes have the infrared sense or at least they can "see" in heat... or those mantis shrimp things can see way more colours than us... i don't feel frustrated about either of those things. curious about what it must be like... but i don't feel a burning disappointment like something is missing from my life..

    must be slightly different for deaf people though as sound is a big part of how we communicate, you family, your friends etc. our world is adapted for sound..
    Omg, you're blind??? How does your computer work?

    That's really interesting what you said. Thanks for your response, Fleurie.
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    (Original post by Sulphur)
    Sunlight, vibrations, an automated machine that throws water on you at a specific time?
    I once tried to make one of those, it ended horribly.
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    (Original post by dendodge)
    Have you read about Helen Keller? She was deaf and blind, and was taught almost entirely through touch. I imagine the many books and films about her would answer some of your questions.
    Yeah, as soon as I did that post I googled it and ended up reading about her. Very inspiring and brave.
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    (Original post by CheeseMunchies)
    Just all ways puzzled me. I guess there head are silent and its visual.
    Whatever language surrounds you I suppose because many deaf people can lip read to an extent (especially, I imagine, if they were born deaf) and they can also presumably read. However I think the sound inside their head would be different to the sound inside someone else's head, hence why when deaf people speak sometimes their voice sounds quite different, the accent or the way they form words, because they are not able to hear back what they are saying and compare it to other people's voices.
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    (Original post by TheGoonerGirl)
    No, what language am I writing to you in?
    Oh aye, jeez I'm an idiot

    Were you born deaf though?
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    (Original post by lilmissshady)
    why not turn you phone on vibration? that's what I do, I'm not deaf but I hate the sound of alarm clocks...


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    My alarm clock is the only thing that works.
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    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    Oh aye, jeez I'm an idiot

    Were you born deaf though?
    No, you're not an idiot!

    Yes, I was born deaf - wrongly shaped inner ear.
 
 
 
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