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    (Original post by HopefulMidwife)
    There's plenty of things that can be done have a look at Kimmytube on Youtube or on longhaircareforum.com.

    Do you have afro hair? I don't, but I have curly hair and I despise this idea that afro hair is limiting. Just as much, or as little, things can be done with it as straight hair; it's down to the person how creative or motivated they are.
    I have afro hair and I can do nothing with it except straighten it and tie it in a bun. It's ridiculously difficult to comb. you have to moisturise it everyday and if you miss a day believe me you know about it. The only alternative is relaxing/texturising which is extremely damaging and because of the damage it looks awful. Weaving which is too fake for my liking and it never looks as good as natural hair unless you can afford to spend a fortune. I have been searching trying to find something for 10 years to do with it and I haven't found anything yet that makes it look nice. The vast majority of black celebrities that have nice hair have fake hair.
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    (Original post by HopefulMidwife)
    There's plenty of things that can be done have a look at Kimmytube on Youtube or on longhaircareforum.com.

    Do you have afro hair? I don't, but I have curly hair and I despise this idea that afro hair is limiting. Just as much, or as little, things can be done with it as straight hair; it's down to the person how creative or motivated they are.
    Thing with being black and having long hair is that its a ball ache to maintain .
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    (Original post by Blake-inator)
    No it's not. Schools make the rules. If they don't want you to wear it, then you don't. If you disagree.... leave
    it's a rule therefore it's not a stupid one?
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    (Original post by Jimbo1234)
    Or


    Pupils are excluded for having very short hair. Why is this any different?
    I have never heard of a pupil being excluded for having short hair, please elaborate
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    (Original post by Rooster523)
    Alternatively- too many ethnic minority school children disobey school rules.
    Exactly, I know I'll probably be struck down by the PC police here, but I'm sick of things like this being reported as discrimination against minorities, when the reality is probably that the ethnic minority kids simply break school rules more than the other kids, why should schools give special treatment to particular kids because they're afraid of being accused of discrimination, the whole PC thing in this country has just got out of hand.
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    Exclusion for hairstyles is ridiculous. You go to school to be educated, not to have arbitrary rules imposed on you. Individuals should have the right to have their hair in whatever style they wish (as long as it's not dangerous - it's fair to expect people with long hair to tie it back for a PE lesson, for example).

    You can tell me that a student can choose their hairstyle over education, but that's really not the point. What is there to gain from having rules against hairstyle? One may argue that it improves standards, but I don't believe it does. I'm much happier at sixth form than I was at high school because I'm no longer subject to ridiculous rules that constantly hinder my attention - allowing me to concentrate on what's important: the learning.
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    (Original post by Amhorangerdgerriug)
    Who cares? I doubt they are being excluded because of their ethnicity, and they shouldn't receive special treatment because of it.

    The school sets its rules, follow them or go elsewhere. It teaches standards and discipline.
    This. I'm of the firm belief that if they come to our country they should follow our rules.
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    (Original post by elitemodella)
    I have never heard of a pupil being excluded for having short hair, please elaborate
    Skinhead = excluded
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    (Original post by Scumbaggio)
    [I]Schools should stop expelling children over their hairstyle and attitude towards adults
    Wait what? This is an extremely weird conflation of an arguably irrelevant cultural thing (hairstyle) and something that could cover more or less any discipline problem. I see an argument for not having a hair code, although I don't necessarily agree. But saying that "attitude towards adults" should never result in expulsion? That seems to concede any hope of discipline whatsoever.
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    (Original post by Jimbo1234)
    Or
    Ethnic minority boys had a problem with authority.

    Just more PC bullcrap. If a white boys started doing this, there would be no article on it, but as soon as ethnic groups do it, it's "discrimination".
    Also their cultural upbringing should be BRITISH. If not, why are immigrants coming here if they are actively seeking not to merge and instead clash with the native culture?



    Pupils are excluded for having very short hair. Why is this any different?
    Search the websites of the dailymail, the star, etc, you'll find plenty of stories about white children excluded because of hair.

    (Original post by Jimbo1234)
    So a bad school. All private or grammar schools I know of have regulations on such things.




    Yup. What rock have you been living under?




    Sounds so hard...oh wait. If you find that hard, than why would I suspect that such a person would do poorly academically? God help them with algebra if combing is a challenge.



    So they are lazy?



    But as I mentioned above, it is actually easy and a good school wants pupils who do not shy away from anything difficult, thus to force good hair discipline would make them a better student.




    Yes.
    Huge.
    As someone with afro-caribean hair, I just wanted to point out that taking care of it without hairstyles like braids cornrows, twist outs etc. is often either very challenging or very expensive. When I went to secondary school, most of the natural, protective hairstyles like braids were banned, so I was left with the options of getting a weave (which normally isn't there for boys) relaxing it (involves a lot of chemicals to straighten the hair. I chose this option but now regret it due to the damaging effects it has. Some people can't even do this as it causes some burning, more in some than in others.) having an afro (which involves a lot more time and money, as if you don't take care of it the results can be awfully disorganised matted hair.) or a close shave, which is also banned in some schools.

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    (Original post by Sheldor)
    Search the websites of the dailymail, the star, etc, you'll find plenty of stories about white children excluded because of hair.

    As someone with afro-caribean hair, I just wanted to point out that taking care of it without hairstyles like braids cornrows, twist outs etc. is often either very challenging or very expensive. When I went to secondary school, most of the natural, protective hairstyles like braids were banned, so I was left with the options of getting a weave (which normally isn't there for boys) relaxing it (involves a lot of chemicals to straighten the hair. I chose this option but now regret it due to the damaging effects it has. Some people can't even do this as it causes some burning, more in some than in others.) having an afro (which involves a lot more time and money, as if you don't take care of it the results can be awfully disorganised matted hair.) or a close shave, which is also banned in some schools.
    The problem is that our society would not allow for a school to have one rule for people with afro-caribbean hair and one rule for those without. I know the hair is very different and a pain to style or have cut, but apparently everyone is perfectly equal so you can't have 2 rules otherwise every liberal dip**** will shout apartheid!
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    (Original post by Jimbo1234)
    The problem is that our society would not allow for a school to have one rule for people with afro-caribbean hair and one rule for those without. I know the hair is very different and a pain to style or have cut, but apparently everyone is perfectly equal so you can't have 2 rules otherwise every liberal dip**** will shout apartheid!
    I'm actually surprised at your sound logic here! You aren't as bad as you act sometimes. I personally don't see the point in strict rules about hair in schools anyway. Fair enough in the world of work, but seems unnecessary in schools. If anything, short skirts are more of an issue than hair can be.

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    There are 2 distinct issues in the article

    First = Hairstyles
    Personally, with 30 years teaching experience I think exclusion for hairstyle is nonsense ... But then I am not a supporter of uniform generally

    Second = Attitudes towards adults
    The argument here is that different cultures do not respect adults so we cannot expect it in schools
    Here I call Bulls!t
    If Culture X does not promote respect for adults/superiors/boss in the home then it would actually be discriminatory of schools to allow that to continue ... essentially we would be saying "if you come from Culture X it is impossible for you to be successful in life because you are incapable of showing appropriate behaviour in school/the work place" instead we should be saying "The appropriate attitude is not taught at home but we will teach it here so that you have an equal opportunity when you leave school"
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    (Original post by victoriajackson)
    I have afro hair and I can do nothing with it except straighten it and tie it in a bun. It's ridiculously difficult to comb. you have to moisturise it everyday and if you miss a day believe me you know about it. The only alternative is relaxing/texturising which is extremely damaging and because of the damage it looks awful. Weaving which is too fake for my liking and it never looks as good as natural hair unless you can afford to spend a fortune. I have been searching trying to find something for 10 years to do with it and I haven't found anything yet that makes it look nice. The vast majority of black celebrities that have nice hair have fake hair.
    Wow, you sound brainwashed. I have nothing to say but check out the links I mentioned. It's upsetting that you believe the only thing to do with afro hair is to straighten it or chemically process it. That's a disservice and disrespect to the many people I know who know how to care for, and enjoy, their afro hair. Wow. Just. Wow.

    By the way, all these women have afro hair and are natural. So don't disrespect afro hair just because you're unable to deal with it;

























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    (Original post by dennisraymondsmith)
    Thing with being black and having long hair is that its a ball ache to maintain .
    People say that about curly hair too *shrugs*, it's not a objective rule, it's subjective to the person dealing with it.
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    (Original post by whyumadtho)
    I don't see what's so controversial about what I've said. Having hair that naturally contracts and clumps limits the amount of things that can be done with it, particularly for traditionally masculine styles. Looking at some of your suggestions, I see that some of the more distinct hairstyles require the hair to be straightened to some degree (or the people's curls are naturally less tight).
    But it's still afro hair, whether it's stretched out or not. There is still plenty of things you can do with afro hair.

    Edit: And it's not even really worth either of us nit-picking and getting into a potentially derailing and several pages long discussion about it. I just want people to know that afro hair is not limiting, and there is plenty that can be done with it. I'm sick of the idea that it's unmanageable and all that crap. Especially when it comes from people who don't have afro hair.
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    fake
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    They should stop messing around then
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    This is stupid, Afro Caribbean males dont have much choice when it does come to hair styles. Majority of the time it is either cornrows or short hair, both of which are deemed to be 'extreme'.
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    OMG we have to make the proportion of ethnic minorities getting expelled exactly the same as the proportion of them living in the UK!!
    Otherwise we'll appear racist!!


    Or not.
    It's PC *******s.
    People should accept that there are differences in culture. People aren't excluded for being a particular race; they're excluded for acting up.
 
 
 
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