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Could Farage's Scotland incident actually benefit him Watch

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    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    I disagree that you only have to meet the threshold you have set yourself. However, you have still failed to do this - the figures are for the period 2008 - 2012...
    The only threshold you have set yourself is that these are **possible** alternatives. I'll leave it to you to look up the difference between possible and probable in the dictionary, rather than taking this thread any more off topic than it already is...
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    (Original post by InnerTemple)



    Is this a net or gross figure?
    Gross.
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    (Original post by Oschene23)
    Gross.
    What is the net figure?
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    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    What is the net figure?
    I have no idea, i got that figure from the official budget report. A highly doubt a net figure could ever be reliably calculated.

    EDIT: UKIP just polled 19%, their highest ever published today, interesting.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    So, the majority of the population are against us being in Europe.
    http://www.europeanvoice.com/article...-eu/77239.aspx
    No, they aren't. Source: the article you posted :rolleyes:

    Yet another schoolboy error. Which year are you in?
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    haha, reading this thread shows some amusing characters.. and also some rather ignorant ones. I'm not going to get involved as it usually ends up get personal, HOWEVER, i will point out that some people are mixing up the EU with the eurozone and each of their very different effects. e.g. cyprus is primarily in trouble due to eurozone, not EU (mainly).
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    (Original post by rhamill95)
    haha, reading this thread shows some amusing characters.. and also some rather ignorant ones. I'm not going to get involved as it usually ends up get personal, HOWEVER, i will point out that some people are mixing up the EU with the eurozone and each of their very different effects. e.g. cyprus is primarily in trouble due to eurozone, not EU (mainly).
    Id agree that people do mix the two up, but I'd also say that the ultimate aim of the EU is a sronger Eurozone. i.e. a federal Europe. So although different, they have converging paths.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    Id agree that people do mix the two up, but I'd also say that the ultimate aim of the EU is a sronger Eurozone. i.e. a federal Europe. So although different, they have converging paths.
    Although they are still (publicly at least) acting as if they are determined to solve the Euro crisis, it's very hard to see how it will remain sustainable for Greece, Italy, Spain, Cyprus, Portugal and possibly even France. None of the southern states are really capable of retaining it and at the same time avoiding calamitous results such as the total breakdown of normal politics in their countries. I find it hard to believe that Berlin and Paris will attempt to remain oblivious to this for much longer - events are going to force their hands. It remains strongly on the cards that the Euro will either collapse as a whole, or else become the currency of a much smaller group of states, at which point the EU will revert to being a much more broad and loose type of entity.

    It is hard to see how the depth of union, fiscal and political, that the Euro truly requires, can actually be engineered. I think it was launched about 20 years too soon.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Although they are still (publicly at least) acting as if they are determined to solve the Euro crisis, it's very hard to see how it will remain sustainable for Greece, Italy, Spain, Cyprus, Portugal and possibly even France. None of the southern states are really capable of retaining it and at the same time avoiding calamitous results such as the total breakdown of normal politics in their countries. I find it hard to believe that Berlin and Paris will attempt to remain oblivious to this for much longer - events are going to force their hands. It remains strongly on the cards that the Euro will either collapse as a whole, or else become the currency of a much smaller group of states, at which point the EU will revert to being a much more broad and loose type of entity.

    It is hard to see how the depth of union, fiscal and political, that the Euro truly requires, can actually be engineered. I think it was launched about 20 years too soon.
    Some good points. But a few of my own.

    The EU/Berlin has two choices with the PIIGS.
    1) Cut them loose.
    2) Integrate them further.

    As there is a desire in Germany, and only Germany at the moment for further integration, don't be surprised if option 2 is the option of choice. And remember, Germany holds the purse strings in these nations.


    Secondly, Berlin and Paris are at loggerheads. Some impartial German news reporting on the issue.

    Franco German Tensions
    http://www.spiegel.de/international/...-a-900514.html

    Support for EU at an all time low except Germany
    http://www.spiegel.de/international/...-a-899460.html
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    Some good points. But a few of my own.

    The EU/Berlin has two choices with the PIIGS.
    1) Cut them loose.
    2) Integrate them further.

    As there is a desire in Germany, and only Germany at the moment for further integration, don't be surprised if option 2 is the option of choice. And remember, Germany holds the purse strings in these nations.

    Secondly, Berlin and Paris are at loggerheads. Some impartial German news reporting on the issue.

    Franco German Tensions
    http://www.spiegel.de/international/...-a-900514.html

    Support for EU at an all time low except Germany
    http://www.spiegel.de/international/...-a-899460.html
    As I said, further integration still appears to be the mindset in Berlin. That doesn't make it viable. If they persist on that course, there will almost inevitably be sharp political collapses in Italy, Spain and Greece (although it's difficult to see how things can get much worse in the latter) and possibly in France as well - the FN and Madame Le Pen are waiting in the wings. I wonder how Merkel will feel having to sit round a table with her? The results of yet another dose of 'integration' are unpredictable and chaotic - probably disastrous.

    France is showing deep cracks along a number of faultlines and I suspect also cannot long retain the Euro.
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    (Original post by Pembleton)
    I think it could have if he had laughed the protestor's remarks off and said something along the lines of, 'Well there's always going to be people who hate you,' etc etc. However labelling people fascists and slamming the phone down on an interviewer just made him look just as bad, so no I don't think it will benefit him.
    Gotta be honest, I've just listened to the interview and it was pretty clear that the BBC chap saw Farage as someone not worth talking to. The tone of the interview was very one-sided and patronising.

    I don't think Farage has handled it too well, but I don't think the BBC have given it very impartial coverage.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    As I said, further integration still appears to be the mindset in Berlin. That doesn't make it viable. If they persist on that course, there will almost inevitably be sharp political collapses in Italy, Spain and Greece (although it's difficult to see how things can get much worse in the latter) and possibly in France as well - the FN and Madame Le Pen are waiting in the wings. I wonder how Merkel will feel having to sit round a table with her? The results of yet another dose of 'integration' are unpredictable and chaotic - probably disastrous.

    France is showing deep cracks along a number of faultlines and I suspect also cannot long retain the Euro.
    A lot of these nations don't even have elected official running them. They have European appointed Troika.

    I've got a brilliant idea though. Why don't we have this big free trade block and every other nations minds their own business and doesn't tell the others how to behave.
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    (Original post by flugelr)
    Gotta be honest, I've just listened to the interview and it was pretty clear that the BBC chap saw Farage as someone not worth talking to. The tone of the interview was very one-sided and patronising.

    I don't think Farage has handled it too well, but I don't think the BBC have given it very impartial coverage.
    Yes. On the BBC News Channel, there was a UKIP MEP being interviewed. The BBC presenter said something about Nigel Farage smoking and drinking, and asked if the MEP felt it affected his judgement.

    Implying that an elected party leader is some sort of drunk on television, without a single reason to do so, really isn't on.
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    thought it was funny that Alex Salmond suggested that the BBC is in no way biased towards UKIP :teehee:
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Yes. On the BBC News Channel, there was a UKIP MEP being interviewed. The BBC presenter said something about Nigel Farage smoking and drinking, and asked if the MEP felt it affected his judgement.

    Implying that an elected party leader is some sort of drunk on television, without a single reason to do so, really isn't on.


    It also "really isn't on" "that an elected party leader" is barred from speaking at meetings of the anti-Scottish Independence movement 'Better Together', or for UKIP to be barred from 'Better Together'.
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    (Original post by Maths Tutor)
    [/B]

    It also "really isn't on" "that an elected party leader" is barred from speaking at meetings of the anti-Scottish Independence movement 'Better Together', or for UKIP to be barred from 'Better Together'.
    There was a time that I used to think that you were just some artistic naive individual. You're ramblings now are becoming more incoherent.

    I'm sure you're one of the weirdo's that likes to post on the Scotsman website.
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    No. The protestors were wrong but the way Farage acted in the phone interview by hanging up the phone doesn't give a good impression of him either. UKIP are not popular in Scotland compared to some parts of England and I hope they will never be popular in Scotland.I will not vote for a party which wishes to take powers away from Holyrood. I don't like the fact that the protest is considered by some people as anti-english even though they were English protestors in the crowd. I think UKIP are just a protest vote.
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    (Original post by Kj91)
    No. The protestors were wrong but the way Farage acted in the phone interview by hanging up the phone doesn't give a good impression of him either. UKIP are not popular in Scotland compared to some parts of England and I hope they will never be popular in Scotland.I will not vote for a party which wishes to take powers away from Holyrood. I don't like the fact that the protest is considered by some people as anti-english even though they were English protestors in the crowd. I think UKIP are just a protest vote.
    A few points. UKIP have never said that they want to take away powers from the people of Scotland. What they've said is that we have Scottish MPs based in Westminster and MSPs based in Holyrood. What they're advocating is merging the two so Scottish MPs do the jobs of MSPs. That's actually a cost saving as it'll cut out 79 MSPS on £53K a year (£4.2 Million wage bill) plus associated expenses that could add up to another several million a year.

    Hanging up a phone doesn't give a good impression, but after 5 minutes of some of the most partisan questioning I've ever seen, what do you want him to do. Continue being abused by a so called impartial reporter.

    Yes there was an English lad there, but as has already been established there was a majority from an extremist SNP grouping there. That English lad would've turned up to protest against anything.


    'd agree that UKIP aren't popular, but remember, neither were the SNP There's still a lot of Scots who don't want to be in Europe (Remember that used to be SNP policy before) They seem to have no voice at the moment so although UKIP may never be a majority party, there still stands a good chance that they may increase their support base. The SNP have gone great guns for attacking Westminster over the EU fisheries policy which is a EU matter. You may start seeing elements of fisherman and farmers aligning themselves with UKIP.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    A few points. UKIP have never said that they want to take away powers from the people of Scotland. What they've said is that we have Scottish MPs based in Westminster and MSPs based in Holyrood. What they're advocating is merging the two so Scottish MPs do the jobs of MSPs. That's actually a cost saving as it'll cut out 79 MSPS on £53K a year (£4.2 Million wage bill) plus associated expenses that could add up to another several million a year.

    Hanging up a phone doesn't give a good impression, but after 5 minutes of some of the most partisan questioning I've ever seen, what do you want him to do. Continue being abused by a so called impartial reporter.

    Yes there was an English lad there, but as has already been established there was a majority from an extremist SNP grouping there. That English lad would've turned up to protest against anything.


    'd agree that UKIP aren't popular, but remember, neither were the SNP There's still a lot of Scots who don't want to be in Europe (Remember that used to be SNP policy before) They seem to have no voice at the moment so although UKIP may never be a majority party, there still stands a good chance that they may increase their support base. The SNP have gone great guns for attacking Westminster over the EU fisheries policy which is a EU matter. You may start seeing elements of fisherman and farmers aligning themselves with UKIP.
    You make some good points but I still disagree with some parts of your post. I listened to the interview again and although the reporter could be considered biased.I still don't think that its an excuse to hang the phone up. Its suggest to me that Nigel Farage cannot take criticism.

    I think the issue of being in the EU is more of a problem for conservative voters in England. I don't think the Scottish electorate are as Eurosceptic as you say. As mentioned in this article- http://www.heraldscotland.com/politi...-vote.21118887

    Why do you think they will increase their support base. The majority of UKIP voters are ex-conservative voters. With the conservatives not being popular in Scotland. Why do you think UKIP has the potential to become popular? I personally think UKIP will not have any impact on Scottish poltics despite their popularity in some parts of England. They might as well re-brand themselves as the English Independence Party.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)

    Yes there was an English lad there, but as has already been established there was a majority from an extremist SNP grouping there. That English lad would've turned up to protest against anything.
    What "extremist SNP grouping" is this then? Are you talking about Radical Independence? Because they are absolutely not part of the SNP or affiliated in any way. Why lie?

    The "English lad" would've turned up to protest against anything but all the Scots were motivated by anti-Englishness? Seriously, you feel capable of ascribing motives to each of the protesters, individually, with absolutely no evidence?

    What's your problem? You seem like a smart enough guy but you're blatantly trying to be disingenuous with just about everything you write on this topic.
 
 
 
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