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    (Original post by yorkshire.lad)
    thanks - and AAA
    lol i got A*A*A
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    These kinds of threads are always going to get negged to oblivion, especially on results day, simply because most people who sit the exams do not get an 'A' grade despite putting a lot of work and effort into them. However, I must say that to a certain extent I agree with you; if too many people get 'A' grades it makes it very difficult for universities and employers to differentiate between better than average students and those who are really gifted. The addition of the A* grade goes some way towards addressing this issue, but I don't think it goes far enough, which is why some of the best universities are considering conducting their own entrance exams.

    I would personally support a return to the stratified system in which only, say, the top 5% of scores are awarded an A* and the top 15% of scores are awarded an A etc. This system isn't without it's problems, it leads to different and unpredictable grade boundaries every year for example. But ultimately, if A Levels do not allow universities and employers to identify the most capable candidates, they're not fit for purpose.
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    (Original post by Namige)
    lol i got A*A*A
    good stuff
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    (Original post by Futility)
    These kinds of threads are always going to get negged to oblivion, especially on results day, simply because most people who sit the exams do not get an 'A' grade despite putting a lot of work and effort into them. However, I must say that to a certain extent I agree with you; if too many people get 'A' grades it makes it very difficult for universities and employers to differentiate between better than average students and those who are really gifted. The addition of the A* grade goes some way towards addressing this issue, but I don't think it goes far enough, which is why some of the best universities are considering conducting their own entrance exams.

    I would personally support a return to the stratified system in which only, say, the top 5% of scores are awarded an A* and the top 15% of scores are awarded an A etc. This system isn't without it's problems, it leads to different grade boundaries every year for example. But ultimately, if A Levels do not allow universities and employers to identify the most capable candidates, they're not fit for purpose.
    If it was based on top 15% etc... it wouldn't show improvements over time at all. The fact that students work harder 10 years from now. For example, the top 10% of students today would probably be the top 5% 20 years ago.
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    (Original post by Namige)
    If it was based on top 15% etc... it wouldn't show improvements over time at all. The fact that students work harder 10 years from now. For example, the top 10% of students today would probably be the top 5% 20 years ago.
    Well perhaps that would stop people constantly going on about how exams are getting easier year after year then huh?

    In seriousness though, I acknowledge that the stratified system has its flaws, but in my view, these are relatively minor in comparison to an exam system which fails to allow universities and employers to differentiate between candidates' respective abilities.
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    (Original post by IAmABaws)
    I just received 4 As as my AS results. I'm not thrilled because an A simply means I may have lost 20% of the marks on the paper. In what world is that a good result?

    I think an A should be 90% of UMS, or an A* grade be introduced.

    What are your thoughts?
    It shouldn't be 90%, because then you start getting judged on silly mistakes rather than ability. If you want a change, you need harder questions at the upper end, and a smaller percentile in the A band.

    Meanwhile, why not go and do STEP / AEA? For maths, that is - scrapping it for other subjects was completely criminal - but even with the government trying to crush your every move there is always a way to differentiate yourself if you look hard enough. If you don't like the system, find ways around it.
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    (Original post by Octohedral)
    It shouldn't be 90%, because then you start getting judged on silly mistakes rather than ability. If you want a change, you need harder questions at the upper end, and a smaller percentile in the A band.

    Meanwhile, why not go and do STEP / AEA? For maths, that is - scrapping it for other subjects was completely criminal - but even with the government trying to crush your every move there is always a way to differentiate yourself if you look hard enough. If you don't like the system, find ways around it.
    Being able to not make silly mistakes is part of the ability. Would you accept it if a surgeon made silly mistakes while operating on your brain?
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    OP is pathetic, loads of people are gutted about their results and you come out with a post like that, please leave TSR....
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    It's not too easy, it's extremely difficult to get 4A's. But I would agree to seeing A* being introduced in AS level.
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    (Original post by Namige)
    Being able to not make silly mistakes is part of the ability. Would you accept it if a surgeon made silly mistakes while operating on your brain?
    It is, but it's not the most important part. To become a mathematician, for example, problem solving skills are far more important than how fast you can add up.
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    (Original post by Futility)
    Well perhaps that would stop people constantly going on about how exams are getting easier year after year then huh?

    In seriousness though, I acknowledge that the stratified system has its flaws, but in my view, these are relatively minor in comparison to an exam system which fails to allow universities and employers to differentiate between candidates' respective abilities.
    But surely such a system would be majorly flawed in allowing employers to differentiate between candidates of different ages? If the top 10% of students are as smart now as the top 5% a decade ago, wouldn't older, less educated generations have a relative advantage, even without an absolute advantage? If 5% is the cutoff for an A*, a person with an A now may be just as qualified as an older student holding an A*, although on paper, the employer would pick the A* candidate?
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    (Original post by Octohedral)
    It is, but it's not the most important part. To become a mathematician, for example, problem solving skills are far more important than how fast you can add up.
    No point being a god-like problem solver if you can't do 4+5 without cocking up.
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    (Original post by IAmABaws)
    I just received 4 As as my AS results. I'm not thrilled because an A simply means I may have lost 20% of the marks on the paper. In what world is that a good result?

    I think an A should be 90% of UMS, or an A* grade be introduced.

    What are your thoughts?
    Congratulations welldone excellent work seriously people like you make me feel sick especially as ive seen many year 12s who have been crying their eyes out as they have failed. Swallow your pride and be grateful you got 4 As. I got AAB in A2 and im well happy but I wouldn't dare boast about it in front of others who didn't do as well since its sickening. Also I know a kid who had this exact attitude got 4 As at AS but completely bombed out this year due to being tooo overconfident and ended up with BBB rather than the 3 A*s he was predicted
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    (Original post by IAmABaws)
    I just received 4 As as my AS results. I'm not thrilled because an A simply means I may have lost 20% of the marks on the paper. In what world is that a good result?

    I think an A should be 90% of UMS, or an A* grade be introduced.

    What are your thoughts?
    My thoughts? You are a ****.
    Care to know more?

    Just shut up, A* is available in Year 13, why should an a be 90%, think before you type. Thanks.
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    This is just someone who thinks they should have done better than their pal. You are not the best get over it.
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    (Original post by Namige)
    If it was based on top 15% etc... it wouldn't show improvements over time at all. The fact that students work harder 10 years from now. For example, the top 10% of students today would probably be the top 5% 20 years ago.
    Exactly, now say 10,000 students work hard and all get high marks in the exam but only the very high scorers get in the 15% which is fair.
    1 year later, another 10,000 students take the exam and score a lot lower than the previous year although the level of the paper is the same - this would be no justice to the previous year individuals who scored very high but did not make the 15% but this year people who have scored significantly lower make the top 15% because everyone did bad.
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    (Original post by R.P.Everything.)
    But surely such a system would be majorly flawed in allowing employers to differentiate between candidates of different ages? If the top 10% of students are as smart now as the top 5% a decade ago, wouldn't older, less educated generations have a relative advantage, even without an absolute advantage? If 5% is the cutoff for an A*, a person with an A now may be just as qualified as an older student holding an A*, although on paper, the employer would pick the A* candidate?
    Indeed, but this problem could be remedied simply by providing universities or employers with relevant data such as raw scores and year upon year grade boundary comparisons. In any case, this is a flaw that exists in the current system also. The fact that the percentage of students achieving the top grades has changed so dramatically over the last 10-20 years means that, rightly or wrongly, an 'A' grade achieved today is perceived by many to be worth less than an 'A' grade gained a decade ago.
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    (Original post by IAmABaws)
    I just received 4 As as my AS results. I'm not thrilled because an A simply means I may have lost 20% of the marks on the paper. In what world is that a good result?

    I think an A should be 90% of UMS, or an A* grade be introduced.

    What are your thoughts?
    If A's were so easy to obtain then there would be a higher percentage of people getting straight A's and not many of the top universities would accept anything less than 3 A's. I think you should see your results as being a positive reflection on your performance as opposed to a negative reflection on the exam marking system. Gaining 80% of the examination marks is not actually a bad thing, it shows you can analyse facts and theories to a high standard in a short space of time.
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    (Original post by cleveradam)
    Exactly, now say 10,000 students work hard and all get high marks in the exam but only the very high scorers get in the 15% which is fair.
    1 year later, another 10,000 students take the exam and score a lot lower than the previous year although the level of the paper is the same - this would be no justice to the previous year individuals who scored very high but did not make the 15% but this year people who have scored significantly lower make the top 15% because everyone did bad.
    This is reductio ad absurdum; such a scenario is highly unlikely to occur in reality. Whilst year on year fluctuations would be expected, assuming that exam difficultly remained approximately constant, scores would be expected to be scattered around a mean. Moreover, as I described in my previous reply, year on year comparisons could be drawn between students simply by providing universities with data such as raw scores and grade boundary movements.
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    (Original post by Futility)
    Indeed, but this problem could be remedied simply by providing universities or employers with relevant data such as raw scores and year upon year grade boundary comparisons. In any case, this is a flaw that exists in the current system also. The fact that the percentage of students achieving the top grades has changed so dramatically over the last 10-20 years means that, rightly or wrongly, an 'A' grade achieved today is perceived by many to be worth less than an 'A' grade gained a decade ago.
    I could see that working with universities, but no employer would bother working out and calculating equivalent grades for employees of different generations. There needs to be a universal and relatively fixed standard by which we can judge all employees, and not just peers amongst equal ages peers. If it is the case that students are getting smarter, then an A today is worth just as much as an A twenty years ago, although many more people will have As today. Obviously, this causes more competition and reduces the opportunities getting an A used to bring, but it doesn't mean As are easier to get. However, there is a way to discriminate the top candidates even as everyone gets smarter and universities are doing it now - increasing their entrance requirements.
 
 
 
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