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Job seeker made to dance to Daft Punk as part of an interview. watch

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    Why were none of my interviews like this? If you get to goof around that much in the interview, imagine how relaxed they'll be when you mess around at work?
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    I'm sure running to the press because an interview didn't go his way (would he have done this had he got the job I wonder?) will have employers fighting to hire him now :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Studentus-anonymous)
    Ahaaa! Nicely done sir.




    Again dunno if 'making' people dance was a good idea (no-one with a gun to his head) but these types of stories always seem to involve some young graduate who is frustrated because they expect a job and respect handed to them on a platter. Again I think it's really important graduates (especially for degrees that sorry to say are not highly specialised and thus not in demand) understand that the real world is not fair and not going to do them any favours.

    Congrats you have a degree, you're now like legions of other graduates passing out every year and joining the backlog of people who wanted to start a career but are now fighting over the same gas-station attendant job.


    The whole script that tells us if we work hard and get a degree than we'll be settled for life is a reality of the past century and we don't live in that baby-boomer world.

    I'm so torn, it does seem somewhat unprofessional to make prospective employees dance like monkeys but on the other hand to me at least, if I had to pull some phat moves to secure a job so be it, tbh dancing sounds a lot more fun than sitting with my best posture and going through the boring motions of a stock tick-check interview.

    Maybe they should have made it an optional activity without flushing non-participants out of the consideration process? Maybe add another interview activity for the dance-shy or clumsy footed?
    Why have you shoe horned the 'graduates arent entitled' rant in to this thread?
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    Not really shoehorned when it's accurate for many. A complicated issue unfortunately, but if you tell legions of young people to reach for their dream career with hefty qualifications, when they come out of that educational system they're going to want those nice but currently hard-to-come by careers, and then get frustrated when they realise that's not going to happen for most of them.

    Shoehorning implied I had to sort of clumsily force it, when it's easy as piss because it's actually, you know... the truth.
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    How disgusting. The Curry's interviewers were animals exploiting the dignity fo someone who was desperate for a job. They ought to be ashamed of themselves.
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    Gotta laugh at all you naive students thinking this is absolutely terrible or shocking. It's just an interview, they can do what they want. Absolutely nothing wrong with this.
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    (Original post by Studentus-anonymous)
    but these types of stories always seem to involve some young graduate who is frustrated because they expect a job and respect handed to them on a platter
    Actually, I think what he expected was a level of professionalism from Currys, who have since admitted that he was right to do so.
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    I don't understand what the problem is here. A company is 100% entitled to choose who they want to work for them, and this includes how they recruit them. We shouldn't enforce a quota or strict guidelines on them, or else everything would be too linear, with no opportunity for variation.

    Also, am I missing something or was this not actually a requirement? Since when can a job applicant not simply say 'piss off, I'm not doing that', as opposed to 'humiliating' themselves and then only moaning about it when getting turned down.
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    I find it quite odd that some people are defending how the interview was conducted. The reason I find it strange, is because Curry's have come out and apologised to him. They also said it was wrong how the interview was conducted, and offered him another interview, which he declined.

    So obviously it was wrong how the interview was conducted, hence the apology issued.
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    (Original post by visa)
    I'm sure running to the press because an interview didn't go his way (would he have done this had he got the job I wonder?) will have employers fighting to hire him now :rolleyes:
    Aye, he's a tool, creating unnecessary exposure. How can future employers be assured that the won't wind up in the news? All over a dance in an interview...
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    I once got asked to "tell a joke" in an interview.

    The only one I could think of was "whats long and hard and full of seamen? A submarine hahaha lol lmao".

    The interviewers gave a polite embarassed laugh.
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    (Original post by CelticSymphony67)
    I find it quite odd that some people are defending how the interview was conducted. The reason I find it strange, is because Curry's have come out and apologised to him. They also said it was wrong how the interview was conducted, and offered him another interview, which he declined.

    So obviously it was wrong how the interview was conducted, hence the apology issued.
    Not necessarily, apologizing is the best way to keep the media off your back. Changing the recruitment process ensures they won't be exposed again. Doesn't mean it was wrong per see, just means that someone is going to moan about it.

    Political correctness comes to mind. Pretty sad being g forced to do interviews in a formalized set way but that is the UK for you. Tick those boxes and jump through those hoops
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    (Original post by Stevo112)
    Not necessarily, apologizing is the best way to keep the media off your back. Changing the recruitment process ensures they won't be exposed again. Doesn't mean it was wrong per see, just means that someone is going to moan about it.

    Political correctness comes to mind. Pretty sad being g forced to do interviews in a formalized set way but that is the UK for you. Tick those boxes and jump through those hoops
    Curry's Head Office confirmed that it was totally incorrect and was not authorised by them. I have no problems with interviews being fresh and a different approach, providing it is relevant to the post one has applied for. Asking this chap to dance to Daft Punk was totally irrelevant to the post he applied for.
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    You guys are all making me really confident about applying for jobs now...

    On topic I'm pretty cynical/utilitarian about the whole thing of applying for jobs to be honest. Maybe I'm naive, stupid or whatever, but I always feel in this sorts of processes you really have to suck up in order to get anywhere, when at the end of the day you're applying for a job at pretty much the bottom end of the spectrum, where all you need to do is work hard, sell your stuff, have enough of a personality to engage in social interaction and basically do your job. You don't need to have always wanted to work for XYZ organisation, and you don't need to particularly love what you're doing if it serves the purpose you need it to do (be it paying for studying, bills, rent or whatever). The point is that all this stuff about edgy interviewing techniques such as performing dances, making up songs etc is just plain unnecessary in my view - again I've little experience in the world of work but I can't imagine it's impossible to ascertain whether or not someone's suited to the job by talking to them and perhaps at a push asking to do a roleplay of interacting with a customer...

    (Original post by BenAssirati)
    I don't understand what the problem is here. A company is 100% entitled to choose who they want to work for them, and this includes how they recruit them. We shouldn't enforce a quota or strict guidelines on them, or else everything would be too linear, with no opportunity for variation.

    Also, am I missing something or was this not actually a requirement? Since when can a job applicant not simply say 'piss off, I'm not doing that', as opposed to 'humiliating' themselves and then only moaning about it when getting turned down.

    It depends how desperate you are for work I suppose.
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    I don't know what to think to be honest. With the amount of applicants they can literally make you do whatever they want in these interviews and you'll do it because you need a job and if you decline they know they'll be fifty gagging applicants to take your place. Only yesterday I applied for a job at Currys so this was an interesting read for me. My confidence is already shot to pieces after applying and getting many rejections but I'm so desperate to get out of the situation I'm in I would have danced my heart out

    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    I once got asked to "tell a joke" in an interview.

    The only one I could think of was "whats long and hard and full of seamen? A submarine hahaha lol lmao".

    The interviewers gave a polite embarassed laugh.
    Did you get the job?
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    (Original post by TheHistoryStudent)
    You guys are all making me really confident about applying for jobs now...

    On topic I'm pretty cynical/utilitarian about the whole thing of applying for jobs to be honest. Maybe I'm naive, stupid or whatever, but I always feel in this sorts of processes you really have to suck up in order to get anywhere, when at the end of the day you're applying for a job at pretty much the bottom end of the spectrum, where all you need to do is work hard, sell your stuff, have enough of a personality to engage in social interaction and basically do your job. You don't need to have always wanted to work for XYZ organisation, and you don't need to particularly love what you're doing if it serves the purpose you need it to do (be it paying for studying, bills, rent or whatever). The point is that all this stuff about edgy interviewing techniques such as performing dances, making up songs etc is just plain unnecessary in my view - again I've little experience in the world of work but I can't imagine it's impossible to ascertain whether or not someone's suited to the job by talking to them and perhaps at a push asking to do a roleplay of interacting with a customer...




    It depends how desperate you are for work I suppose.

    I guess so, but I dislike anyone who is more than willing to lower themselves, but complain when something doesn't go their way. I am willing to bet any amount he would not have brought it up if he got the job.

    It's a shame companies must now hire the people they are told to, the way they are told to, with dire consequences if they choose to be independent.
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    (Original post by Really_now)
    I don't know what to think to be honest. With the amount of applicants they can literally make you do whatever they want in these interviews and you'll do it because you need a job and if you decline they know they'll be fifty gagging applicants to take your place.
    Always a worrying sign when the balance of power shifts firmly to the employer- the aviation industry is perhaps one of the most extreme examples which I think serves as a real cautionary tale in the massively competitive world of graduate/ young people trying to launch their careers:

    Airlines operate in an incredibly competitive and expensive market. They also require pilots, people who tend to be fiercely passionate about acheiving their perceived dreams of flying jets. So when you've got thousands of people beating down the door desparate for work you can afford to take some liberties and cut your costs. You know full well that you can cut the salary and people will still be applying in their droves. Your competitors do the same. You set up some big PR friendly scheme with big flying schools to drum up more applicant interest and prey on the uninformed. Your competitors do the same.

    Eventually, as is the case nowadays, you end up with a steady stream of thousands upon thousands of wannabe pilots getting increasingly more desperate to 'live the dream' of watching the computer fly the plane thanks to you 'approved' school's relentless and semi-fictional marketing and targeting of the least well informed. You can make them work for free, work as contractors with no job security, even make then go to your 'approved' schools to pay for all of their training themselves. You can offer them a six month pay-to-work scheme after charging them for applying and charging them for their own interview.

    But, for the passionate dreaming wannabe pilot, they've finally landed their dream job and the coveted 'look-at-me-I'm-a-pilot' status. They've suffered, struggled and got themselves into extreme levels of debt (£100k+ is fairly typical), but they've made it.

    Then they wonder why they're kicked out after six months and replaced with the next poor paying fool in the queue.

    That is why I admire the guy in this article for refusing another interview. I don't think he's naive enough to expect people to be throwing great jobs at him as a reward for academic study, instead I think he's switched on enough to recognise and value his own personal worth and refuse to help employers in their race to the bottom.

    Good luck to him.
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    (Original post by CelticSymphony67)
    Asking this chap to dance to Daft Punk was totally irrelevant to the post he applied for.
    (a) No, it wasn't. It shows that he's willing to make himself look like an idiot for the sake of getting a job, that he doesn't mind looking like an idiot generally, which might be useful in sales, and that he's outgoing enough to be suited to the role.

    (b) If a company wants to decide between applicants by applying irrelevant criteria, that's their prerogative. If you don't want the job enough to do what they say, you can politely refuse and leave.
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    (Original post by Spridget)
    Always a worrying sign when the balance of power shifts firmly to the employer- the aviation industry is perhaps one of the most extreme examples which I think serves as a real cautionary tale in the massively competitive world of graduate/ young people trying to launch their careers:

    Airlines operate in an incredibly competitive and expensive market. They also require pilots, people who tend to be fiercely passionate about acheiving their perceived dreams of flying jets. So when you've got thousands of people beating down the door desparate for work you can afford to take some liberties and cut your costs. You know full well that you can cut the salary and people will still be applying in their droves. Your competitors do the same. You set up some big PR friendly scheme with big flying schools to drum up more applicant interest and prey on the uninformed. Your competitors do the same.

    Eventually, as is the case nowadays, you end up with a steady stream of thousands upon thousands of wannabe pilots getting increasingly more desperate to 'live the dream' of watching the computer fly the plane thanks to you 'approved' school's relentless and semi-fictional marketing and targeting of the least well informed. You can make them work for free, work as contractors with no job security, even make then go to your 'approved' schools to pay for all of their training themselves. You can offer them a six month pay-to-work scheme after charging them for applying and charging them for their own interview.

    But, for the passionate dreaming wannabe pilot, they've finally landed their dream job and the coveted 'look-at-me-I'm-a-pilot' status. They've suffered, struggled and got themselves into extreme levels of debt (£100k+ is fairly typical), but they've made it.

    Then they wonder why they're kicked out after six months and replaced with the next poor paying fool in the queue.

    That is why I admire the guy in this article for refusing another interview. I don't think he's naive enough to expect people to be throwing great jobs at him as a reward for academic study, instead I think he's switched on enough to recognise and value his own personal worth and refuse to help employers in their race to the bottom.

    Good luck to him.
    That's really sad. It's probably only set to get worse. I'm not defending airline companies but if they your competitors pull this tactic then it's not like you will be able to afford to do differently. You'd be forced into doing the same to remain in business.

    I commend him for making the choice that was right for him? But what if you can't afford to refuse interviews? What was most sad was the middle aged man who had been made redundant had a baby on the way and was made to dance for the job. Wouldn't a more appropriate roleplay be to sell a laptop or deal with a difficult customer?
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    (Original post by Studentus-anonymous)
    Not really shoehorned when it's accurate for many. A complicated issue unfortunately, but if you tell legions of young people to reach for their dream career with hefty qualifications, when they come out of that educational system they're going to want those nice but currently hard-to-come by careers, and then get frustrated when they realise that's not going to happen for most of them.

    Shoehorning implied I had to sort of clumsily force it, when it's easy as piss because it's actually, you know... the truth.
    That's nice, but the topic of this thread is demeaning treatment in interviews.
 
 
 
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