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    (Original post by Cannotbelieveit)
    Douglas Haig was an awful commander who should have faced trail for complete incompetence resulting in almost 2 million deaths under his command.
    I disagree. When Haig joined the army, soldiers still wore red and fought in straight lines. By the time he left he had developed combined-arms tactics that we still use today and modern camouflage was coming into use.

    It is worth remembering that the largest army Britian had ever sent abroad was about 250,000 under Wellington in Spain. Haig was flying blind and frankly did pretty well when you consider what he was up against.

    I'm not saying he was any Caesar, but he wasn't the blundering buffoon he is made out to have been.
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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    WW1 serves as a reminder to us, never to engage in war for the sake of it. Always know who you're fighting, and what you're fighting for.
    For the UK, it fought to defend a neutral country's neutrality, namely Belgium. Had the Germans not gone through Belgium we could have kept out.

    For all of the horrors associated with WW1, our actions on entry were honourable. Defending the weak against the strong.

    I know that's a very simplified answer. But I'm claiming Ocams Razor on this one.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    For the UK, it fought to defend a neutral country's neutrality, namely Belgium. Had the Germans not gone through Belgium we could have kept out.

    For all of the horrors associated with WW1, our actions on entry were honourable. Defending the weak against the strong.

    I know that's a very simplified answer. But I'm claiming Ocams Razor on this one.
    Defending Belgium wasn't worth the confrontation with Germany and subsequent loss of millions of lives, in my opinion. Maybe the demise of the genocidal Ottoman empire was a silver lining though.

    (Perhaps it deserves a mention too that Belgium was a homicidal dictatorship back then, although I'm not referring to the Belgian civilian victims of Germany, but the Leopold regime)
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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    Defending Belgium wasn't worth the confrontation with Germany and subsequent loss of millions of lives, in my opinion. Maybe the demise of the genocidal Ottoman empire was a silver lining though.

    (Perhaps it deserves a mention too that Belgium was a homicidal dictatorship back then, although I'm not referring to the Belgian civilian victims of Germany, but the Leopold regime)
    Me getting a black eye, split lip and cracked rib cage wasn't worth the confrontation I had a few years ago stopping somebody getting mugged. But it was still the right thing to do.

    I don't really think the military planners in 1914 envisaged a four year slaughter when they stepped in. Just like I didn't expect my injuries. C'eat la vie.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    Me getting a black eye, split lip and cracked rib cage wasn't worth the confrontation I had a few years ago stopping somebody getting mugged. But it was still the right thing to do.

    I don't really think the military planners in 1914 envisaged a four year slaughter when they stepped in. Just like I didn't expect my injuries. C'eat la vie.
    I see your point, but it soon became about quite a lot more than just Belgium. It was a suicide move for the civilised world.
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    (Original post by modulaa)
    Hey! I'm doing an EPQ on how the horrors of World War One should be commemorated on the 100th anniversary of the event and I was just wondering what you guys thought.
    Is it suitable to celebrate winning the war or should it be a solemn event? What sort of events would you expect to be held?

    Also, if anyone knows of any events happening, it would a great help if you could tell me or give me a link to the website or something.

    thanks in advance!
    But how many writers were inspired by it? Sassoon, Owen are two that I remember from class. There's probably a lot more. You could make one line of argumentation that some people under these extreme circumstances found themselves, or were inspired in a way they otherwise would not have been.
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    (Original post by Snagprophet)
    Edit: Because that's what Tolkien was writing while he was in the trenches.
    Actually Tolkien specifically stated that what he wrote wasn't influenced by his war experiences. Most was pre-written before the war and was about other things he'd done. It's possible that it's affecting him on a subconscious level but the truth is the war inspired him less than some people want to believe.
    OT: Re-signing the armistice to say 'definitely no more war' would probably be good, even if it's just a formality.
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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    I see your point, but it soon became about quite a lot more than just Belgium. It was a suicide move for the civilised world.
    I'm sort of agreeing with you, and not at the same time.

    I'll try and explain why. If we look at Empire forces involved in WW1, certain forces took exceptionally high casualty rates. One such dominion was Canada. I've just re watched the rather excellent 2008 Canadian war film Passchendeal. At the end of that they state that 1 in 10 Canadian soldiers died. Not as big a casualty rate as you may think. My great grandfather was a professional soldier who went over with the BEF and survived from 1914 to 1918 without a scratch. Casualty rates in Normandy were higher than that of WW1.

    I'm not trying to talk down the casualties as they were horrendous. A recent trip to the Somme and Thiepvil taught me that no matter how many books I've read.

    WW1 had huge troops numbers and many very large set piece battles involving larger troop concentrations than WW2.

    The question is how to remember it though. I strongly believe that education is the key to that. Not just class room based, but through visits.

    My time there bought the scale if it to reality. It put my own experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan into perspective. I lost friends in both of those, but we were able to grieve for them because we could send them back home. The Menim gate and Thiepvil memorials listing those missing really showed me one of the reasons why it was so dramatic. Families could not grieve. I found myself in a weird state at the Lochnagar crater as there is a simple cross to indicate the last resting place of a fusilier who's remains were found and identified in 1998. Private George Nugent of the Tyneside Scottish Northumberland Fusiliers.

    Thats what I want. I want school kids to stand where I've stood and attempt to understand. I want them to remember people like Pte Nugent, and let them know that they haven't been forgotten, just like I won't forget my mates who were lucky enough to be sent home.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    I'm sort of agreeing with you, and not at the same time.

    I'll try and explain why. If we look at Empire forces involved in WW1, certain forces took exceptionally high casualty rates. One such dominion was Canada. I've just re watched the rather excellent 2008 Canadian war film Passchendeal. At the end of that they state that 1 in 10 Canadian soldiers died. Not as big a casualty rate as you may think. My great grandfather was a professional soldier who went over with the BEF and survived from 1914 to 1918 without a scratch. Casualty rates in Normandy were higher than that of WW1.

    I'm not trying to talk down the casualties as they were horrendous. A recent trip to the Somme and Thiepvil taught me that no matter how many books I've read.

    WW1 had huge troops numbers and many very large set piece battles involving larger troop concentrations than WW2.

    The question is how to remember it though. I strongly believe that education is the key to that. Not just class room based, but through visits.

    My time there bought the scale if it to reality. It put my own experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan into perspective. I lost friends in both of those, but we were able to grieve for them because we could send them back home. The Menim gate and Thiepvil memorials listing those missing really showed me one of the reasons why it was so dramatic. Families could not grieve. I found myself in a weird state at the Lochnagar crater as there is a simple cross to indicate the last resting place of a fusilier who's remains were found and identified in 1998. Private George Nugent of the Tyneside Scottish Northumberland Fusiliers.

    Thats what I want. I want school kids to stand where I've stood and attempt to understand. I want them to remember people like Pte Nugent, and let them know that they haven't been forgotten, just like I won't forget my mates who were lucky enough to be sent home.
    I agree that WW1 should be remembered, and all the more because it was a mistake (in my opinion at least). I mean, remembering the dead of WW2 is about celebrating their success in defeating fascism. Remembering the dead of WW1 is, for the most part, remembering their success in blind, pointless and abject war. For me, that makes it more psychologically haunting.
 
 
 
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