The degrees most likely to land you In McDonalds... Watch

Arieisit
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(Original post by Sannn)
As much as I'm biased toward psychology (heck I'm even doing it at uni now) I can painfully see why it's on the list. To get a job as any kind of psychologist - whether that be forensic, clinical, neuro or whatever, you need post-grad training, and for clinical and neuro at least, that's another 3 or 4 years. Also, you're bound by the BPS (British Psychological Society) to only work in Britain so you can't exactly go abroad, which sucks ://

On the other hand, a psychology degree quips a student with loads of transferable skills (scientific reports, stats AND essays) - coupled with the competition and length of a post-grad degree, you can see why so little psych graduates actually go into the field afterwards. You'd think that with so many transferable skills that McDonalds would be the last place a psych graduate ends up? Go figure...might need a psychologist to figure it out
What is the point of this post besides ranting?

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SkAlley
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I think something like American Studies should be in there as I can't see any obvious career path into that (please don't anyone say "you can work in America" lol). A degree like that seems like more of a......I don't know..... hobbie, or just finding out interesting facts that you could look up yourself without spending 9k :/
Apologies to anyone who does this/wants to study this

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Rosey203
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My degree is on there. (Childhood and Youth Studies) but tbf with how much the qualifications are changing to get into working with children and young people I think I'm making the right decision. Though I'll likely end up training to be a social worker post-grad.
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Sannn
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(Original post by Arieisit)
What is the point of this post besides ranting?

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It's not a rant, it's just giving an insight as to why psychologists aren't employed in places other than McDonalds...
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jennylass
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Nursing is a really intensive degree now there's 37.5 hour weeks at uni, but any degree so long as you do work experience and extras you'll get the job you want. I get the feeling the author just simply is angry that he/she didn't get to go to university by the complete lack of sense the article makes.
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King Leonidas
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#66
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Surprised my course is not on the list (politics & philosophy).
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06gtaylo
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(Original post by Octopus_Garden)
Do you want to work in the legal profession, or to simply to have a respected degree that will open up graduate job opportunities to you?
No im just wondering, because other than being a judge or solicitor I cant really think of any other professions available from this degree. Having a mental block lol
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Bill_Gates
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I have a lot of respect for Nurses, most of them are angels and do a very difficult job. No disrespect to nurses whatsoever

I think when you decide to become a nurse or teacher for example or even a doctor i dont think you should go into it for the money.
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kerrydouglas
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(Original post by Sannn)
Go figure...might need a psychologist to figure it out
You can come back for us on a few years!



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pheonixfeather
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(Original post by Octohedral)
Agreed. Nursing is vocational - it's one of the most employable degrees there is.

Which leads me to believe the author is simply venting his dislike of 'less rigorous' / 'less academic' / 'less scientific' degrees by disguising his motivation as altruistic.
But so many people do nursing it's hard for them all to get jobs.


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Cornelius
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4. Architecture
LOL
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Get_Lucky_606
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Tbh a lot of that is accurate, I used to work in a cafe a couple years ago - one girl there was bit older than me and had a degree in criminology lol.
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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I hate the way people always say "do well in life or you'll end up working in McDonald's" because most people have eaten there at some point, and wouldn't have been able to if people didn't work there.

Also, a few of my friends applied for McDonald's after graduating, but got rejected. Imagine how they feel!
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Octopus_Garden
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Whaddya know! Turns out agriculture is a degree is demand, according to this American article, which explains why.

Bad news for architects though. Apparently the recession's really damaged their sector, which makes sense. That may or may not be the case here, across the pond. (No, the Atlantic Ocean, not Amelia.)
http://education.yahoo.net/articles/...st_degrees.htm

(Original post by SkAlley)
I think something like American Studies should be in there as I can't see any obvious career path into that (please don't anyone say "you can work in America" lol). A degree like that seems like more of a......I don't know..... hobbie, or just finding out interesting facts that you could look up yourself without spending 9k :/
Apologies to anyone who does this/wants to study this

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Either the author hadn't heard of it, or they thought it was adequately covered by "history". :dontknow: I think history is a big component (although not the only component) of a typical degree in American Studies.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...rse-guide.html

(Original post by Rosey203)
My degree is on there. (Childhood and Youth Studies) but tbf with how much the qualifications are changing to get into working with children and young people I think I'm making the right decision. Though I'll likely end up training to be a social worker post-grad.
I would say you are. I posted about the absurdity of that being on the list, earlier. I'm fairly certain most of the staff at my children's pre-school have degrees or similar in child development, and it makes a measureable difference.

This list is not based on any research. Someone very prejudiced has gone down a list and gone "well, what's that for?" "What practical use is it?" My mother likes to do the same thing, actually, only being of a different generation, she sneers at scientific-looking degrees! Overall, the career advice is as much use as my mother's idea that taking A-level maths and a science at A-level is over-specialising, (she wanted me to drop one of them for English Literature, which was my worst subject) and that having more than one maths-type AS/A level damages your CV/university application for maths! :rofl2:
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Pipsico
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(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
I hate the way people always say "do well in life or you'll end up working in McDonald's" because most people have eaten there at some point, and wouldn't have been able to if people didn't work there.

Also, a few of my friends applied for McDonald's after graduating, but got rejected. Imagine how they feel!
That's a ridiculous argument. It's not even an argument, it's like saying most people have put out their trash for the bin man to collect. It doesn't mean people should feel proud of being a bin man having got a degree.

I have nothing against bin men or McDonalds employees - but they are low skilled low paid jobs that we naturally should not aspire to.


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xoxAngel_Kxox
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(Original post by Pipsico)
That's a ridiculous argument. It's not even an argument, it's like saying most people have put out their trash for the bin man to collect. It doesn't mean people should feel proud of being a bin man having got a degree.

I have nothing against bin men or McDonalds employees - but they are low skilled low paid jobs that we naturally should not aspire to.


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You're quite right - it's not an argument. It's an opinion, which I'm fully entitled to post.

Personally I think refuse collectors are incredibly underrated. Also it's not a low paid job - have you ever actually seen how much they earn? Starts on £17,000 and can be as much as £25,000 if you reach a managerial position.
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_anyawalsh
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Gutted my degree area is up there, but it's hardly surprising (fashion)

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SkAlley
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(Original post by Octopus_Garden)
Either the author hadn't heard of it, or they thought it was adequately covered by "history". :dontknow: I think history is a big component (although not the only component) of a typical degree in American Studies.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...rse-guide.html
That article does explain a great deal more to me about what the course entails than I orginally assumed so thanks
Still not sold on what skills you can transfer for a job but ah well :/
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a729
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(Original post by lilyobz)
Medicine, with the quality of their food people will need an on-queue Doctor there lol.
The quality of your spelling suggests you need an English teacher lol!
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lilyobz
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(Original post by a729)
The quality of your spelling suggests you need an English teacher lol!
zzzz lame generic grammar Nazi.. :rolleyes:
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