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Does filtering London tap water make it taste any better? Watch

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    (Original post by redferry)
    Who hasn't though?

    I wonder if londers that particular taste more palatable than elsewhere...
    Beef space raiders smell of it too, try it, you'll be shocked.
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    (Original post by redferry)
    Well, I'm not dead yet?
    It took three years if training for that analysis ¬¬
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    (Original post by Friendly Liberal)
    Why would you filter London tap water? Is it really as bad as you make it out to be? I don't think the water agency would allow polluted water for your drinking.
    I get the impression you've never lived in London.

    A filter should change the taste. In the student halls last year, the water tasted a bit weird so we bought a filter. It sorted it out completely. We still use it now but the water's not as bad here so it no longer really matters.
    I'm quite surprised you feel bottled water is expensive, though. When I lived in London I'd constantly see huge bottles of water selling for really cheap, less than a small bottle of Evian etc.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    It took three years if training for that analysis ¬¬
    Hey, I've not studied human biology since A level...
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    (Original post by james1211)
    Beef space raiders smell of it too, try it, you'll be shocked.
    Linden trees as well. Walk through the park with Linden trees and you're like why in hells name does it stink of jizz here?!?!
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    (Original post by sliceofcake)
    I get the impression you've never lived in London.

    A filter should change the taste. In the student halls last year, the water tasted a bit weird so we bought a filter. It sorted it out completely. We still use it now but the water's not as bad here so it no longer really matters.
    I'm quite surprised you feel bottled water is expensive, though. When I lived in London I'd constantly see huge bottles of water selling for really cheap, less than a small bottle of Evian etc.
    http://www.buzzfeed.com/alanwhite/be...rkets?s=mobile
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    (Original post by redferry)
    Linden trees as well. Walk through the park with Linden trees and you're like why in hells name does it stink of jizz here?!?!
    Yes, they used to make tea from it, can't imagine wanting to drink much of that....
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    (Original post by james1211)
    Yes, they used to make tea from it, can't imagine wanting to drink much of that....
    Bleugh

    Like hot London tap water I imagine.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    Can you actually do this as alcohol is a diuretic?

    Give me answers biology expert.
    It's what people did in medieval times when the water was literally full of dead animals and human ****, and also it's a myth that alcohol doesn't hydrate you
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    It's what people did in medieval times when the water was literally full of dead animals and human ****, and also it's a myth that alcohol doesn't hydrate you
    So why do I feel incredibly dehydrated after a night of drinking?
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    So why do I feel incredibly dehydrated after a night of drinking?
    OK, alcohol itself does dehydrate, but the less the ABV, the more the drink's water content can replace the diuretic effect, and it probably was a net gain for medieval small beer at about 1-2%.

    (Original post by io9.com)
    According to the researchers [Maughan, Leiper, Shirreffs 1996, British Journal of Sports Medicine], these results indicate that beverages with low alcohol concentrations have "a negligible diuretic effect" when consumed in a state of exercise-induced dehydration. The researchers conclude that recovering from a state of dehydration is effectively the same whether you're rehydrating with water, or a beverage containing up to 2% alcohol — though drinks containing 4% alcohol, they write, "tend to delay the recovery process."


    Of course, "delay" ≠ "prevent entirely," so what the researchers are actually saying is: yes, you can rehydrate with a beverage containing roughly 4% alcohol; you'll just recover more slowly than you would with a 2% brew in your hand.
    And of course if your "night of drinking" involves not just ales, lagers and ciders, but spirits and other hard liquour, you cannot hope for a net hydration gain.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    OK, alcohol itself does dehydrate, but the less the ABV, the more the drink's water content can replace the diuretic effect, and it probably was a net gain for medieval small beer at about 1-2%.



    And of course if your "night of drinking" involves not just ales, lagers and ciders, but spirits and other hard liquour, you cannot hope for a net hydration gain.
    Thanks.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    Thanks.
    Also your night out drinking often involves salty food somewhere along the line! Also caffeine (coke, red bull)
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    (Original post by DouglasAdams)
    This is a bit complicated because "taste better" is quite person-specific.

    Generally though, it is the ions within water which give water "taste" beyond its pure, distilled flavour. Most people are of the opinion that water containing a great number of ions tastes better.
    But then there is the complication of regions. On the whole, the South of England gets more ions in its water than the North and most people from the South, as well as neutrals, will tell you that for this reason their water tastes better. Obviously London is part of the South. However, the consensus in the North seems to be that they prefer water with minimal ions, although this may be because they have been brought up on such water.

    So if you are looking with water containing "taste" London will have some of the best water. However, if you prefer pure, or distilled water with an absence of ions or "taste" (you can get an idea if you've ever visited a city like Newcastle and tried the water there), then filtering will certainly make your tap water taste better for you.
    LOL we have way better water in the north, more rain = better h20
 
 
 
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