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The hardest courses for admissions are those with October Deadline Watch

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    (Original post by dire wolf)
    your literally stupid as hell
    *You're.
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    (Original post by dire wolf)
    alright lad im sorry but what you said was so stupid!! didnt you read the part about the MRI scanner?? we physicists created that.
    That was for you dude. No reason to be so mad.
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    (Original post by arrow900)
    Good luck with your brain dead course.

    Anyone with an ounce of intellectual ability and curiosity would immediately revolt to the idea of rote memorizing textbooks for 5-7 years of their life.

    Before you come up with the awful excuse " but doctors have a billion a*'s at A level " just stop, grab a gun, and shoot yourself. A Levels don't count for **** when compared to doing research and studying a subject at its forefront, which you will never do seeing as you will repeatedly carry out work that has been done by hundreds before you.

    I appreciate Doctors but I just find it frustrating when they are seen as intellectual God's. Rant over.
    The memorising and intensive learning is a prerequisite for the creative aspects of being a doctor.

    How can someone research or treat a complex case without confidently knowing how the disease works, the symptoms, etc?

    It's the same with any profession or field, but it is more pronounced with health-related professions.
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    (Original post by ThatPerson)
    The memorising and intensive learning is a prerequisite for the creative aspects of being a doctor.

    How can someone research or treat a complex case without confidently knowing how the disease works, the symptoms, etc?

    It's the same with any profession or field, but it is more pronounced with health-related professions.
    Well if they "confidently" knew how the disease works I doubt that the case could be really classified as "Complex". Regardless I wonder what percentage of cases Doctors come across in their career can be classified as "complex". Most are quite routine.

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    I am myself a medical student at Imperial, having just finished my second year and going into my third. I personally found getting into medicine very difficult.

    The lowest grade I have ever achieved in a public exam is an A grade, this is both in total and modular grades. I sat both the UKCAT and BMAT and got decent grades in both. I had all the volunteering down, I founded the debating society at my school, was an academic prefect in mathematics and french, and a senior tutor to kids in the surrounding primary schools.

    I had always been adept at logico-spatial and mathematical subjects, and this was reflected in my A levels grades (where I got much higher scores in physics and mathematics than I did in biology and chemistry). I also started a natural sciences degree prior to my medical course with the open university, having done modules in things like molecular genetics (which I had an out of date copy of on my profile).

    I had and still have an interest in social science, and was selected by competitive admission to attended the Harvard Model United Nations, as part of the Trade and Development Committee in the 2011 assembly, and have also done an extracurricular course in classical philosophy. I didn't get flat out offers from my applications, and gave interviews of varying quality.

    I post only in rebuttal to a few points. Medicine is a hard course (at least for me anyway)- its as much about learning though the understanding of systems in neuroscience, pathology, oncology, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, immunology -and so on- than any science subject I had personally come across. The second thing is that those of you doing other degrees who believe you will be doing research "at the forefront of your field" underscore a phenomenal lack of foresight. It's really, really hard to do research at the forefront of your field, and I say this from talking to friends who find doing this exceedingly difficult who are on full scholarships to both Harvard and MIT.

    Secondly, biomedical students- whilst they do important, exceptional and corollary research to that carried out by medics, most research done in hospitals that I am aware of is carried out by doctors. In the London trusts, you cannot get a consultant post in surgery unless you have a PhD. Some of the doctors at our trust (such as Lord Darzi) have personally piloted fields such as robotic surgery (infact darzi received an honorary engineering degree for this). Memorizing facts can work, but up to a breaking point- one which appears early in medicine, and I've seen friends I care for dearly crack under the pressure and leave, due to their failed attempts at "memorising" medicine. It's too much if you do it that way. Some might?

    Also most learned people can tell you the basics of MRI scanners- that was covered in GCSE and then again in A levels. Yes a physicist at Harvard produced the first ever one-dimensional MRI. Physics is awesome. And you might know more about it as a physicist- but you can't interpret it.

    I've never felt more attacked for doing medicine, and I'm quite saddened by it, tbh.
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    (Original post by ParetoOptimum)
    That's weird. Logic would dictate that schools would direct a tonne of support towards Oxbridge and medicine/vet applicants. After all, 1) these courses are very hard to get onto and 2) There's nothing like boasting to prospective parents/teachers/employers about the number of successful Oxbridge/Medicine applications you oversaw

    That's how my school operated. The medics/vets and Oxbridge applicants had workshops, mock interviews, one-on-one tutoring and so on, while the rest of us had to make do with a little help with our personal statement (if we asked for it)

    Then again our school was used to sending a very large proportion of students off to medicine/vet school and Oxbridge so they had an efficient support system in place. I suspect for schools with very few to no students going to these places on average each year, they're under-supported.
    Must admit our school wasn't too big on the logic. You're right very very few (if any) students made it into med school/oxbridge from our school and they weren't too bothered about those students probably because 1. they assumed they were smart enough to be self sufficient and get on with it (which to some extent is true) and 2. because they thought it was very unlikely and therefore a waste of time spending too much time/effort on those students.

    I had to NAG my teachers and staff to help proof read my personal statement. Luckily I was signed up to a e-mentoring scheme through uni of nottingham which was a massive help. It was the university that held various workshops and sessions for med students.
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    All the jealous non medical students come @ me.


    I will always be more respected than you as a doctor.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    Personal statements are easy to write if you're smart enough to become a doctor, dentist or vet. It really isn't hard to write about your work experience, why you want to do the course, what extra research you have done, what opportunities you'd like to pursue, etc. All it would take is a day to research the internet for material, and find a couple books you could talk about, then a few hours over a couple of days to draft and redraft.

    If your school has to hold your hand when writing a personal statement and explaining how UCAS works, you have very little hope of coping on a course with an October deadline. Think for yourself, instead of having to be instructed to do basic things. Half an hour's googling would have explained to you how UCAS works.
    I think that's debatable. I would consider myself smart enough to become a doctor, since I got accepted into med school but I honestly didn't find my personal statement an easy thing to write, and it definitely did not take a days research. It took me from mid July to beginning of October to write mine and I was still nervous as to whether or not it was good enough. (Maybe I just lacked confidence).

    I don't think that's the point really. In my opinion applying to uni is one of the ''biggest'' and most probably ''most challenging'' things you'd across at this age. I think your school explaining things and supporting you through the process is very important.

    Point is I think October courses ARE harder to get into and this (for me) is just another reason why.
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    (Original post by All Taken)
    I am myself a medical student at Imperial, having just finished my second year and going into my third. I personally found getting into medicine very difficult.

    The lowest grade I have ever achieved in a public exam is an A grade, this is both in total and modular grades. I sat both the UKCAT and BMAT and got decent grades in both. I had all the volunteering down, I founded the debating society at my school, was an academic prefect in mathematics and french, and a senior tutor to kids in the surrounding primary schools.

    I had always been adept at logico-spatial and mathematical subjects, and this was reflected in my A levels grades (where I got much higher scores in physics and mathematics than I did in biology and chemistry). I also started a natural sciences degree prior to my medical course with the open university, having done modules in things like molecular genetics (which I had an out of date copy of on my profile).

    I had and still have an interest in social science, and was selected by competitive admission to attended the Harvard Model United Nations, as part of the Trade and Development Committee in the 2011 assembly, and have also done an extracurricular course in classical philosophy. I didn't get flat out offers from my applications, and gave interviews of varying quality.

    I post only in rebuttal to a few points. Medicine is a hard course (at least for me anyway)- its as much about learning though the understanding of systems in neuroscience, pathology, oncology, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, immunology -and so on- than any science subject I had personally come across. The second thing is that those of you doing other degrees who believe you will be doing research "at the forefront of your field" underscore a phenomenal lack of foresight. It's really, really hard to do research at the forefront of your field, and I say this from talking to friends who find doing this exceedingly difficult who are on full scholarships to both Harvard and MIT.

    Secondly, biomedical students- whilst they do important, exceptional and corollary research to that carried out by medics, most research done in hospitals that I am aware of is carried out by doctors. In the London trusts, you cannot get a consultant post in surgery unless you have a PhD. Some of the doctors at our trust (such as Lord Darzi) have personally piloted fields such as robotic surgery (infact darzi received an honorary engineering degree for this). Memorizing facts can work, but up to a breaking point- one which appears early in medicine, and I've seen friends I care for dearly crack under the pressure and leave, due to their failed attempts at "memorising" medicine. It's too much if you do it that way. Some might?

    Also most learned people can tell you the basics of MRI scanners- that was covered in GCSE and then again in A levels. Yes a physicist at Harvard produced the first ever one-dimensional MRI. Physics is awesome. And you might know more about it as a physicist- but you can't interpret it.

    I've never felt more attacked for doing medicine, and I'm quite saddened by it, tbh.

    Don't pay attention to the medic/dentist (and rarely vetmed) hate on TSR. Some guy told me two days ago that I'm wasting my time because the pay is so **** and that I'm dumb to have wasted my life. :lol:


    I'm a 4th year btw. Well 5th soon
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    (Original post by Marky Mark)
    All the jealous non medical students come @ me.


    I will always be more respected than you as a doctor.
    Thank you for your kind words! I really appreciate it.


    BUT- The respect you receive will depend on socio-normative etiquette and the general opinions of the society you live in.

    For example in India (I'm not Indian but have spoken to Indian friends about this), Engineering is seen as the most impressive and respected degree for males in certain areas.

    Plus someone on here might end up doing something amazing. You can't make that predicate.

    EDIT: I wish you the very best of luck for 5th year, and your FY1 in time!
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    Hardest course to get an offer from: Cambridge Engineering (not biased at all), nah but I guess Oxbridge in general.

    Hardest course to get into: Cambridge Maths, STEP is a killer lol.
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    (Original post by Marky Mark)
    Don't pay attention to the medic/dentist (and rarely vetmed) hate on TSR. Some guy told me two days ago that I'm wasting my time because the pay is so **** and that I'm dumb to have wasted my life. :lol:


    I'm a 4th year btw. Well 5th soon
    Medics pay is bad whilst training, but when they're fully qualified GPs or consultants they're earning well, long hours though. Dentists are basically like bankers lmfao, cant even dispute their salaries haha
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    (Original post by ando181)
    Medics pay is bad whilst training, but when they're fully qualified GPs or consultants they're earning well, long hours though. Dentists are basically like bankers lmfao, cant even dispute their salaries haha

    Yeah but really dentistry is beneath me.



































    notsrs































    semisrs
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    (Original post by Marky Mark)
    Yeah but really dentistry is beneath me.
    Dumbest **** I've ever heard, you must be a troll.
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    (Original post by ando181)
    Dumbest **** I've ever heard, you must be a troll.
    How is it dumb?


    You never hear about someone asking for a dentist in an emergency?
    :lol:

    I'll call you if you if I have an abscess.


    Spoiler:
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    Okay I'm joking.
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    (Original post by Marky Mark)
    How is it dumb?


    You never hear about someone asking for a dentist when you're stranded on a plane in an emergency?


    I'll call you if you if I have an abscess.


    Spoiler:
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    Okay I'm joking.
    I dont know if you were actually joking or actually being serious....
    Its dumb because its like me saying that dentists should look down on medics because they work half their hours and get paid twice as much. Or because dentists are self employed and can choose when they want to work.
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    (Original post by ando181)
    I dont know if you were actually joking or actually being serious....
    Its dumb because its like me saying that dentists should look down on medics because they work half their hours and get paid twice as much. Or because dentists are self employed and can choose when they want to work.

    I was poking fun at the med/dentistry rivalry. :getmecoat:
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    (Original post by Marky Mark)
    I was poking fun at the med/dentistry rivalry. :getmecoat:
    ah fair enough, I would have been surprised if you genuinely felt that way about dentists lol (not a dentistry student btw)

    Your have a post saying if there were bio medical/pharmacy students at your uni you'd laugh at them though?
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    (Original post by Xotol)
    Dat reputation doe. DAT societal status and respect.
    There is none mate. Used to be. Not anymore. People distrust doctors thanks to the media, and people with higher paying jobs will look down at you and I quote a city banker I met who asked what I was thinking of applying for: 'somebody's got to do it haven't they'
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    (Original post by ando181)
    ah fair enough, I would have been surprised if you genuinely felt that way about dentists lol (not a dentistry student btw)

    Your have a post saying if there were bio medical/pharmacy students at your uni you'd laugh at them though?

    lol
 
 
 
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