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Muslim girl who went to an Islamic faith school... Ask me anything! Watch

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    (Original post by aishaahmed96)
    Just want to say it's so lovely to actually have people like u on here who ask genuine questions in a decent way without being rude and sarcastic about Islam and Muslims


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    Thank you for your comments, and all of your answers of course
    I accept your point about unsavoury comments being targeted at Muslims on occasion. Much of this stems from a lack of understanding between different faith groups and the lack of opportunity to ask genuine questions. The Islamic community does not always choose to integrate more broadly within society. I make that point as an observation and not as a criticism. This can mean that the only time people hear Islam mentioned is when it involves extremist activities and infamous terrorist organisations - not the best advert! I'm sure you would feel the same sense of revulsion as I would when you hear of atrocities carried out in the name of Islam.

    More questions if I may..

    Does the lack of integration between the Muslim community and broader society concern you?
    If you wanted to become a spokesperson within society, would that be permissible given that you are female?
    I went to a C of E school where we were taught Christian teachings however we were also taught to be quietly respectful of other faiths. Does it concern you that you were not given that same ethos?
    Is there a word/term used for non-Muslims? What is it?
    What does insha Allah mean? I'm guessing God be with you?

    Oops, I'm getting carried away! I just find it so interesting
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    (Original post by Roger1)
    As salamu alaykum

    Do you wear the hijab?
    When did you last visit Somalia?
    Can you speak Somali?
    Have you ever had a boyfriend and if not then have you ever desired to have one?
    Wa alaykum asalaam,

    1. Yes
    2. I've actually never been lol. insha Allah one day though
    3. Yes, pretty fluently.
    4. No
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    I feel sorry for you
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    (Original post by Willowbob)
    Thank you for your comments, and all of your answers of course
    I accept your point about unsavoury comments being targeted at Muslims on occasion. Much of this stems from a lack of understanding between different faith groups and the lack of opportunity to ask genuine questions. The Islamic community does not always choose to integrate more broadly within society. I make that point as an observation and not as a criticism. This can mean that the only time people hear Islam mentioned is when it involves extremist activities and infamous terrorist organisations - not the best advert! I'm sure you would feel the same sense of revulsion as I would when you hear of atrocities carried out in the name of Islam.

    More questions if I may..

    Does the lack of integration between the Muslim community and broader society concern you?
    If you wanted to become a spokesperson within society, would that be permissible given that you are female?
    I went to a C of E school where we were taught Christian teachings however we were also taught to be quietly respectful of other faiths. Does it concern you that you were not given that same ethos?
    Is there a word/term used for non-Muslims? What is it?
    What does insha Allah mean? I'm guessing God be with you?

    Oops, I'm getting carried away! I just find it so interesting
    I see your point, (although I wasn't the one who made that comment - you quoted another user) but I do understand what you mean. As for your questions:

    1. I'm not quite sure what you mean here as where I live (London) the Muslim community is pretty well integrated with the wider community and it's the same in other major cities I think... In other areas it may be less so, it's understandable of course as Muslims by nature are very close-knit and stick with each other but I would say that getting involved with the broader community is paramount, especially as we live in times were Islam is seen as "evil" and "other" by many.

    2. I would say yes, but it really depends. Islamically, women are not permitted to take up roles of leadership because those roles are designated for men. But for a woman to speak out of behalf of other women in the society and act as a role model for them, I don't see how that would not be allowed. There's definitely a lack of female role models with current Muslim society and it would be good to go some way to combat that, within Islamic guidelines of course.

    3. Thing is, C of E schools are primarily funded by the state and so are required by law to teach certain subjects, but the school I went to was not, and so did not have such requirements. I think for that reason the school just thought it would be easier to teach us solely about Islam, and since it was possible for us to get an RS GCSE by doing just that it seemed the easiest option. Personally, I don't think it's caused too much of a problem because I read up about other religions of my own accord anyway. Having said that, there are some of my friends who are completely clueless about other religions, but at the same time there are many many people I have met who were taught R.E for 5 years straight and yet they don't know the first thing about a religion other than Christianity. Honestly I don't think studing R.E in school really amounts to much, as the majority of people treat it is a lesson they can doss about in and the Religious Studies GCSE is quite possible one of the easiest ones out there. So in short, my answer is no.

    4. Yep, the Arabic term for a non-believer is Kaafir, one who commits "kufr" (disbelief). It's regarded by some as somewhat of a derogatory label, 'infidel' etc but it's just the word for a non-Muslim. A polytheist, pagan or worshipper of idols would be called a "mushrik", one who commits shirk (associating partners with God).

    5. It means "if Allah wills", often said when speaking about the future, because nothing can expect except by the will of God
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    Would you feel comfortable being around the opposite sex at university?
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    As salamu alaykum once again!

    What would you do if your kids leave Islam?
    Would you like to move to another country one day?
    Would you let your husband have a second wife?
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    (Original post by ilikeyoutoomuch)
    I feel sorry for you
    Good for you
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    (Original post by Blackshadow)
    Would you feel comfortable being around the opposite sex at university?
    I went to a state sixth form so I've been around the opposite sex for the past 2 years... I'm pretty shy around guys but it's not like being around them offends me or anything. I'm sure I'd be okay being around them at university.
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    (Original post by Roger1)
    As salamu alaykum once again!

    What would you do if your kids leave Islam?
    Would you like to move to another country one day?
    Would you let your husband have a second wife?
    Wa 'alaykum asalaam warahmatullahi wabarakatuh:

    1. Wow, I really don't know. I hope I would raise them with good Islamic values so they wouldn't (insha Allah). That said, if it was a boy and he was no longer of school age then I would kick him right out of the house. I pray this never happens to any of us.

    2. Yes definitely, inshaAllah.

    3. I'd rather he didn't, but I don't know if I would actually forbid him to do so. Don't want to make the halal haraam, basically. I would definitely discuss it beforehand to prevent any surprises after marriage, and most likely I would only marry someone who told me wasn't interested in taking another wife anyway.
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    Again thanks for providing this fascinating insight

    Are you discouraged from wearing 'western-style' clothes?
    Is the headscarf compulsory or frowned upon if you choose not to wear one?
    Do Islamic schools provide sex education? I thought it was a compulsory part of the curriculum.
    Could you ever go swimming as you would have to expose your legs in order to do so?
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    The questions are coming thick and fast now! Hope you don't mind

    Are there different levels of Islam? For example the Taliban are famously opposed to the education of girls in parts of Pakistan. Do they claim it is for religious reasons?

    When you said earlier that men were designated the leadership roles within your community, I wondered about independent activists like Malala Yousafzai. Is she challenging Muslim norms by choosing to act as an ambassador? Do you find her inspirational?
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    (Original post by themorninglight)
    Wa 'alaykum asalaam warahmatullahi wabarakatuh:

    1. Wow, I really don't know. I hope I would raise them with good Islamic values so they wouldn't (insha Allah). That said, if it was a boy and he was no longer of school age then I would kick him right out of the house. I pray this never happens to any of us.
    And what if it was a girl?
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    (Original post by Willowbob)
    Again thanks for providing this fascinating insight

    Are you discouraged from wearing 'western-style' clothes?
    Is the headscarf compulsory or frowned upon if you choose not to wear one?
    Do Islamic schools provide sex education? I thought it was a compulsory part of the curriculum.
    Could you ever go swimming as you would have to expose your legs in order to do so?
    1. If by "western-style" clothing you mean mini skirts and shorts and stuff, then yes of course. Wearing shorts or a mini skirt would obviously go against what I am commanded to do, which is to dress modestly. I can wear western-style clothes all I want at home though.

    2. The headscarf is compulsory yes, I don't really know how people who don't wear it are treated though as I've worn it for as long as I can remember.

    3. I don't know about all the Islamic schools in the UK but we weren't taught sex education in my school, no.

    4. Ever heard of a women's only session? Haha. I can go swimming, go to the gym, etc all of that provided there are no men involved. But if you mean swimming in places such as public beaches then obviously I can't just strip down to a bathing suit so I don't think I would be able to swim there. Some people do I think but personally I wouldn't want to.


    P.S: there is actually Ask About Islam thread in the Religion forum in case you hadn't seen it... You can ask as many questions as you want over there and there are a lot more people there too so you won't have to wait ages for me to answer you
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    (Original post by Willowbob)
    The questions are coming thick and fast now! Hope you don't mind

    Are there different levels of Islam? For example the Taliban are famously opposed to the education of girls in parts of Pakistan. Do they claim it is for religious reasons?

    When you said earlier that men were designated the leadership roles within your community, I wondered about independent activists like Malala Yousafzai. Is she challenging Muslim norms by choosing to act as an ambassador? Do you find her inspirational?
    It's fine don't worry

    Blimey, that's a huge and very dense question. Firstly, I don't know much about the Taliban at all so I wouldn't be able to give you a definitive answer to what they do or how they justify their actions. As for the different levels of Islam, I wouldn't say there are different "levels", but people do obviously interpret religion in different ways. Just look around you, do the Muslims you see at school, uni, work etc appear the same to you as the people in the Taliban? People value religion in different ways and live drastically different lives due to it, but "different levels" isn't really how I would put it.

    And as for Malala, I don't really know. Honestly all I feel is sympathy for her as she's being used as nothing more than a puppet. And I know this is going to make me sound harsh but no I don't feel particularly inspired by her. There are plenty of other women who I feel inspired by.
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    Was evolution ever mentioned?
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    (Original post by Exon)
    Was evolution ever mentioned?
    Yes of course, we had to pass our GCSEs lol. But like I said before, the teacher would basically say "this is what you need to say to get the marks, but it's not what we believe" and that was just how it was.

    (I thought I'd answered this already btw, sorry )
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    (Original post by themorninglight)
    There was a lot of stuff about Muslim faith schools in the media last month and I figured it'd be good to try and answer any questions you guys may have about it. Or anything else you want to ask really
    Asalamu alaykum.

    In regards to learning about Islam in the school, what exactly was taught?

    Were you taught fiqh for example?

    Did you still have to go dugsi alongside school?

    Were classes segregated?
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    (Original post by Reform)
    Asalamu alaykum.

    In regards to learning about Islam in the school, what exactly was taught?

    Were you taught fiqh for example?

    Did you still have to go dugsi alongside school?

    Were classes segregated?
    Wa 'alaykum asalaam,

    Well. Not sure how to explain really... We had a timetabled lesson dedicated to Islamic studies but the content varied a lot over the years. For example I remember in years 7, 8 & 9 we were taught seerah, basic aqeedah, fiqh (Hanafi), adaab & akhlaaq, stories of the prophets etc. But it wasn't really in depth, as you can imagine we were 11-14 years old then so it was quite simple stuff. Then as we got closer to our GCSE years we were taught the Edexcel "Islam" specification. We also had timetabled Qur'an lessons where we were taught Tafseer, Tajweed and memorisation but it wasn't really consistent at all so not as impressive as it sounds lol. Alhamdulilah though

    Nope I didn't, but only because both my parents are Qur'an teachers themselves so they taught me at home. I've actually never been to dugsi believe it or not, although at one point I did join an 'Aalimah programme (but I complained so much my parents took me out of it lol)

    & nah it was a girls only school, all the teachers were female too.
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    Were there any non Muslim teachers or were they all Muslim?
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    (Original post by themorninglight)
    Wa 'alaykum asalaam,

    Well. Not sure how to explain really... We had a timetabled lesson dedicated to Islamic studies but the content varied a lot over the years. For example I remember in years 7, 8 & 9 we were taught seerah, basic aqeedah, fiqh (Hanafi), adaab & akhlaaq, stories of the prophets etc. But it wasn't really in depth, as you can imagine we were 11-14 years old then so it was quite simple stuff. Then as we got closer to our GCSE years we were taught the Edexcel "Islam" specification. We also had timetabled Qur'an lessons where we were taught Tafseer, Tajweed and memorisation but it wasn't really consistent at all so not as impressive as it sounds lol. Alhamdulilah though

    Nope I didn't, but only because both my parents are Qur'an teachers themselves so they taught me at home. I've actually never been to dugsi believe it or not, although at one point I did join an 'Aalimah programme (but I complained so much my parents took me out of it lol)

    & nah it was a girls only school, all the teachers were female too.
    I can't even lie, it does sound impressive and it seems as though the school taught you guys the foundation of what's needed to be known in Islam which is excellent.

    Honestly, before this, I had no idea what exactly was taught.

    You didn't miss much by not going dugsi (the one I went to that is). Too many children in one classroom and the teacher constantly shouting. I somehow ended up being the teachers pet yet being sent out the most. I still have no idea how that works...

    Smh, that didn't even cross my mind. Alhamdulillah, that's good though.
 
 
 
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