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Psychology - is it a science or not. The ultimate debate thread Watch

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    I think we can all agree psychology has a long way to go. Hopefully we'll come to better understand mental illness and improve lives (which after all, is the most important factor for me personally). I intend on sticking to neuropsych as it could be seen as the more scientific side of psychology. At least compared to psychoanalysis. :cool:

    (Original post by hellodave5)
    Aye, maybe... I need to look more into the specifics of available roles. Would be happy with clinical neuropsychology, or as a cognitive neuroscience researcher in a clinical context.

    I think I would like something hands on though... would probably hate pure research. Would like to work in a hospital/clinical setting.
    Cool. Likewise for me - I find all of it really fascinating and I'd love to apply it to a clinical setting. It's a long haul though - it's the three year BSc, three year clinical psychology doctorate and finally a years MSc in clinical neuropsychology (I think this is right, anyway. Correct me of I'm wrong). I intend on doing a masters though because as you probably know, the competition for the doctorate is ridiculous so having a masters improves the chance, even if only slightly.

    I wouldn't like to do just research either, unless I was doing some seriously innovative research.
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    (Original post by TolerantBeing)
    Dementia and schizophrenia are seen as different because dementia has a much more physical aetiology, in that simply put, it's physical damage of the brain. Whereas schizophrenia's aetiology is a hell of a lot more complicated and less 'physical'.

    I honestly don't see your point, Psychology recognises this. Differences in behaviour is not always (but can be) the result of direct differences in physical structures of the brain, but as you know there's also a lot more to it than that! Yes the mind is the brain, but it's also more than that, just as the brain is also more than just our mind (it's involvement in more primitive functions).
    "I'm not sure what you mean by your last point. I'm hoping to enter clinical neuropsych and treat patients. I don't expect do be doing groundbreaking research or discover a cure (although a cure would be fantastic)." (DannyYYYY)

    For near enough a century, our profession (psychiatrists, psychologists and now neuroscientists) have been trying to 'cure' schizophrenia et al. There is a huge interplay between pharmaceutical companies, new medication, government and our profession in maintaining that we are going to eventually find a cure, just give us more time, which in turn keeps people who don't break the law, but are a socio and economic problem off the streets. I have worked with 'mentally ill' people and when they had to be given drugs, even if they said no they didn't want them, we had to make sure they took them. The drugs did nothing except knock them out, it didn't change their behaviour ('cure them'). I just think there is something fundamentally wrong in this process when little to no progress has been made, yet even today, a study declares 80 new genes have been discovered which will help solve this riddle. No doubt, in another 10 years, more research will come up again solving this problem which todays' new research was supposed to do.

    (Thanks for the discussion, I got sidetracked a bit and your points have made me think about my own views).
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    (Original post by DannyYYYY)
    I think we can all agree psychology has a long way to go. Hopefully we'll come to better understand mental illness and improve lives (which after all, is the most important factor for me personally). I intend on sticking to neuropsych as it could be seen as the more scientific side of psychology. At least compared to psychoanalysis. :cool:



    Cool. Likewise for me - I find all of it really fascinating and I'd love to apply it to a clinical setting. It's a long haul though - it's the three year BSc, three year clinical psychology doctorate and finally a years MSc in clinical neuropsychology (I think this is right, anyway. Correct me of I'm wrong). I intend on doing a masters though because as you probably know, the competition for the doctorate is ridiculous so having a masters improves the chance, even if only slightly.

    I wouldn't like to do just research either, unless I was doing some seriously innovative research.
    If you are going to be studying for that why don't do you do medicine then then specialise in psych


    Nightworld1066
 
 
 
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