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    course work was graded by percentage, just the overall module mark was graded like this at my uni, but the degree was give out as a 1st, 2:1, 2:2 etc

    I guess each uni has it's own way with grading
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    (Original post by NuriaM)
    Nope not all Uni's, my Uni marks with percentages which then for ur final grade tops up to either +70% - 1st class, +60% -2:1, +50% - 2:2, +40% - 3rd.

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    Have you finished uni? If so what did you get overall? if not, then what have you got so far?

    What university do/did you go to?
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    (Original post by David B)
    Have you finished uni? If so what did you get overall? if not, then what have you got so far?

    What university do you go to?
    I'll be going to my final year, so far I've achieved 67% overall which is equivalent to a high 2:1, hoping to achieve a first. I am studying chemical engineering at Teesside University


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    (Original post by NuriaM)
    I'll be going to my final year, so far I've achieved 67% overall which is equivalent to a high 2:1, hoping to achieve a first. I am studying chemical engineering at Teesside University


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    How was the 67% overall calculated from the first and second years?
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    (Original post by David B)
    How was the 67% overall calculated from the first and second years?
    Calculated from my 2nd degree as the first year doesn't count towards my final grade. 2nd year counts for 25% of my final grade + I did a placement year which counts to 5% and my final year counts for 70%.

    How it's calculated is adding all your grades as grade x the module credit and dividing it by the total amount of credits for the year which should be 120 e.g.

    If you got (using chem eng as the example);

    70% in fluid mechanics which is a 10 credit module
    65% thermodynamics which is 20 credits
    85% engineering maths which is 20 credits
    .....all the way till all the modules u completed in that yr;

    (70x10) + (65x20) + (85x20).....and the divide it all by 120, this will give u ur average grade



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    (Original post by NuriaM)
    Calculated from my 2nd degree as the first year doesn't count towards my final grade. 2nd year counts for 25% of my final grade + I did a placement year which counts to 5% and my final year counts for 70%.

    How it's calculated is adding all your grades as grade x the module credit and dividing it by the total amount of credits for the year which should be 120 e.g.

    If you got (using chem eng as the example);

    70% in fluid mechanics which is a 10 credit module
    65% thermodynamics which is 20 credits
    85% engineering maths which is 20 credits
    .....all the way till all the modules u completed in that yr;

    (70x10) + (65x20) + (85x20).....and the divide it all by 120, this will give u ur average grade



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    Ah that's how it works thanks

    50% 70 CREDITS 50x70 = 3500
    70% 10 CREDITS 70x10 = 700
    65% 20 CREDITS 65x20 = 1300
    85% 20 CREDITS 85x20 = 1700
    TOTAL = 120 CREDITS

    3500 + 700 + 1300 + 1700 = 7200
    7200 % 120 = 60
    60 = 2:1
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    (Original post by David B)
    Ah that's how it works thanks

    50% 70 CREDITS 50x70 = 3500
    70% 10 CREDITS 70x10 = 700
    65% 20 CREDITS 65x20 = 1300
    85% 20 CREDITS 85x20 = 1700
    TOTAL = 120 CREDITS

    3500 + 700 + 1300 + 1700 = 7200
    7200 % 120 = 60
    60 = 2:1
    Yep is that your grade? For which year?


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    (Original post by NuriaM)
    Yep is that your grade? For which year?


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    Na it was just an example. I haven't even started uni yet Although when I do I'm planning to take a Japanese Elective which is worth 20 Credits. That's like 1/6 of the total for the year :eek:

    How many modules do you normally take in a year?
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    (Original post by David B)
    Na it was just an example. I haven't even started uni yet Although when I do I'm planning to take a Japanese Elective which is worth 20 Credits. That's like 1/6 of the total for the year :eek:

    How many modules do you normally take in a year?
    Varies from year to year, usually about 6 to 7 modules. When are u thinking of starting? Usually the credits for modules are 10, 20, 30 or 40 the high credits are usually dissertation modules. I see u like anime *high 5* lool btw love u pic


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    (Original post by NuriaM)
    Varies from year to year, usually about 6 to 7 modules. When are u thinking of starting? Usually the credits for modules are 10, 20, 30 or 40 the high credits are usually dissertation modules. I see u like anime *high 5* lool btw love u pic


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    I'm starting uni in September
    Should I take the first year really serious? Like really put the effort in, because it doesn't even count towards your final degree classification. I understand I need to take in the information because it'll help me during the later years, but should I work as hard as I would on the 2nd, 3rd and fourth year?

    According to http://university.which.co.uk/ only 43% of students doing my degree at my university actually get a 2:1 or higher.
    :rofl:
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    (Original post by David B)
    I'm starting uni in September
    Should I take the first year really serious? Like really put the effort in, because it doesn't even count towards your final degree classification. I understand I need to take in the information because it'll help me during the later years, but should I work as hard as I would on the 2nd, 3rd and fourth year?

    According to http://university.which.co.uk/ only 43% of students doing my degree at my university actually get a 2:1 or higher.
    :rofl:
    I would advise u to take it seriously, once u start a pace of studying and getting used to how the lecturers teach, curriculum etc. it will be easier for u for the rest of the year, if u understand what I mean. If u don't end up bothering for 1st year it's very likely that, that would progress until 2nd year making you less motivated. Also like u mentioned stuff u learn in 1st year sets the foundation for the rest of the years.

    And wow 43% then I would def advise u to study hard.


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    (Original post by NuriaM)
    I would advise u to take it seriously, once u start a pace of studying and getting used to how the lecturers teach, curriculum etc. it will be easier for u for the rest of the year, if u understand what I mean. If u don't end up bothering for 1st year it's very likely that, that would progress until 2nd year making you less motivated. Also like u mentioned stuff u learn in 1st year sets the foundation for the rest of the years.

    And wow 43% then I would def advise u to study hard.


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    How much did you self study while doing your degree? Like how many hours a day on average? How many hours a day when a exam was coming up? Any tips and techniques to make sure I'm getting the best out of the time I'm self studying. Because during college I did a BTEC and didn't do any self studying so it's going to be difficult when I'm at the halls and dedicating my free time to work.
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    I got a low 2:2 average in second year and a 3rd in third year, and managing to bring it up to a 1st overall, just, by resitting third year with a 77 average. I just need to keep it up in fourth year.

    I got a 2:2 primarily due to mental health and alcoholism, which ruined a number of parts of my life for a few years.

    It's not easy, particularly when you're in recovery and the odd slip-up can happen and it only takes one slip-up for things to spiral again, and it certainly requires motivation, but it feels so good to go back to getting good grades. Sure, grades are far from everything, but for me it's been a pretty solid measure of control over my life. If I'm getting 70+ in modules, then I definitely have a greater level of control over my mental health and addiction than I did this time last year or the year before.
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    (Original post by David B)
    How much did you self study while doing your degree? Like how many hours a day on average? How many hours a day when a exam was coming up? Any tips and techniques to make sure I'm getting the best out of the time I'm self studying. Because during college I did a BTEC and didn't do any self studying so it's going to be difficult when I'm at the halls and dedicating my free time to work.
    I self studied a lot, usually after my lectures I would go to library with some friends and do the tutorial questions or go through things we didn't understand. It depends on the days sometimes eg in my 2nd year on Monday I had lectures from 9am till 7pm with one hour breaks in between. I would only study about 1hr30 on those days because it was too long usually we had Tuesday off or half a day on Tuesday so would study for 6hrs.
    On average I would study about 6-7hrs on days that I had more time and 3-4hrs on days that I had less time.

    For exams I would keep it the same, 6-7hrs studying, with my study cards I would spend the time going through relevant questions and theories that I could use on the tests. A week before the exam would usually consist of group studies which lasted 5hrs.

    Best thing for self studying is know the module content, know what your going to be learning and go through the recommended reading list that will be given to you. As well as that I would usually use google books if searching for more information or google in general but u need to make sure it matches the content given to by the lecturer. Also when studying long hours, like I do, take short breaks in between. Every 1hr I take a 10min break, your mind needs it. Don't cram everything till the last minute, I would say as soon as u get ur module guides, start learning the stuff that you will be taught in a weeks time in advance will help u understand it better then just waiting plus if u get into a routine of studying earlier it will help to achieve better grades when exam time hits.
    Be organised! Best student planner u can get is; The Palgrave student planner, I've used it every year and it's always helped me stay organised with my time !
    What I tend to do is study what I had done the day before, if I hadn't already done so that day and add a bit extra, and I also study what I will be doing the next day which might be a different module.


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    (Original post by DarkWhite)
    I got a low 2:2 average in second year and a 3rd in third year, and managing to bring it up to a 1st overall, just, by resitting third year with a 77 average. I just need to keep it up in fourth year.

    I got a 2:2 primarily due to mental health and alcoholism, which ruined a number of parts of my life for a few years.

    It's not easy, particularly when you're in recovery and the odd slip-up can happen and it only takes one slip-up for things to spiral again, and it certainly requires motivation, but it feels so good to go back to getting good grades. Sure, grades are far from everything, but for me it's been a pretty solid measure of control over my life. If I'm getting 70+ in modules, then I definitely have a greater level of control over my mental health and addiction than I did this time last year or the year before.
    Well done! Def an inspiration to others, you pushed urself to achieve much better that took dedication! What advise would u give someone who is constantly partying and getting drunk, causing them to miss out on like 60% of lectures, and handing assignments in late or missing them completely? This person has already repeated the year once, but they really want to do well however, they just don't push themselves to work. I have spoken to them and given them advise but they still didn't push themselves.


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    (Original post by NuriaM)
    I self studied a lot, usually after my lectures I would go to library with some friends and do the tutorial questions or go through things we didn't understand. It depends on the days sometimes eg in my 2nd year on Monday I had lectures from 9am till 7pm with one hour breaks in between. I would only study about 1hr30 on those days because it was too long usually we had Tuesday off or half a day on Tuesday so would study for 6hrs.
    On average I would study about 6-7hrs on days that I had more time and 3-4hrs on days that I had less time.

    For exams I would keep it the same, 6-7hrs studying, with my study cards I would spend the time going through relevant questions and theories that I could use on the tests. A week before the exam would usually consist of group studies which lasted 5hrs.

    Best thing for self studying is know the module content, know what your going to be learning and go through the recommended reading list that will be given to you. As well as that I would usually use google books if searching for more information or google in general but u need to make sure it matches the content given to by the lecturer. Also when studying long hours, like I do, take short breaks in between. Every 1hr I take a 10min break, your mind needs it. Don't cram everything till the last minute, I would say as soon as u get ur module guides, start learning the stuff that you will be taught in a weeks time in advance will help u understand it better then just waiting plus if u get into a routine of studying earlier it will help to achieve better grades when exam time hits.
    Be organised! Best student planner u can get is; The Palgrave student planner, I've used it every year and it's always helped me stay organised with my time !
    What I tend to do is study what I had done the day before, if I hadn't already done so that day and add a bit extra, and I also study what I will be doing the next day which might be a different module.


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    Wow such a nice detailed answer!

    Thankyou


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    (Original post by Trustno1)
    Wow such a nice detailed answer!

    Thankyou


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    Sorry it was quite long loool 😊 and no problem


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    (Original post by NuriaM)
    Well done! Def an inspiration to others, you pushed urself to achieve much better that took dedication! What advise would u give someone who is constantly partying and getting drunk, causing them to miss out on like 60% of lectures, and handing assignments in late or missing them completely? This person has already repeated the year once, but they really want to do well however, they just don't push themselves to work. I have spoken to them and given them advise but they still didn't push themselves.


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    It's a bit difficult for me to advise on that, as my circumstances were very different.

    If it's partying then it's probably a case of prioritisation and reminding them that there's all the time in the world for partying after the deadline or the exam. They could actually be struggling with study methods though; so it might be worth asking the university what academic support services they offer?

    If you think the partying is actually alcoholism, then speaking to a counselling service, doctor, or AA/Smart Recovery may be good options, as well as government campaign sites like http://www.last-orders.org/
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    (Original post by DarkWhite)
    It's a bit difficult for me to advise on that, as my circumstances were very different.

    If it's partying then it's probably a case of prioritisation and reminding them that there's all the time in the world for partying after the deadline or the exam. They could actually be struggling with study methods though; so it might be worth asking the university what academic support services they offer?

    If you think the partying is actually alcoholism, then speaking to a counselling service, doctor, or AA/Smart Recovery may be good options, as well as government campaign sites like http://www.last-orders.org/
    I believe it's related to alcoholism just based on what he has told me but I don't know how to tell him that. I think it's caused him a lot of problems in terms of his work. The reason y am even thinking about this is because I have given him advice before and I don't know I guess I just like seeing my peers succeed especially when they have potential to do so


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    (Original post by NuriaM)
    I believe it's related to alcoholism just based on what he has told me but I don't know how to tell him that. I think it's caused him a lot of problems in terms of his work. The reason y am even thinking about this is because I have given him advice before and I don't know I guess I just like seeing my peers succeed especially when they have potential to do so


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    Mm could be worth sitting down and having an open conversation with him about it. If he's not too receptive to the chat, could point towards other services he could think about getting in touch with if he feels the need to.
 
 
 
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