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Should parents be fined for taking kids on holiday? watch

  • View Poll Results: : Should Parents be fined?
    Yes
    31.25%
    No
    68.75%

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    Parents usually take them on holidays on the last week of term. What significant and useful topics can teacher really teach on the last week? And this idea goes across secondary schools and sixth form colleges.
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    Almost 64,000 fines have been issued since the law changed in September 2013, according to research by the BBC.

    If it wasn't for being allowed to go on holiday in the last two weeks of term, I wouldn't have gone on holiday at all as a child - as it was all my parents could afford.

    Is this another example of the Tories hitting the poor? Given the administrative costs of sending out invoices for these fines, I'm not sure whether it makes all that much money.

    But according to schools minister Nick Gibb, students are going to school more.

    Weighing everything up, should schools be fining parents for term-time holidays?
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    (Original post by Numberwang)
    Weighing everything up, should schools be fining parents for term-time holidays?
    No school has ever fined a parent for taking their child on holiday.
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    No school has ever fined a parent for taking their child on holiday.
    Do I mean the local authority / Department of Education?
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    (Original post by Numberwang)
    Do I mean the local authority / Department of Education?
    Local authorities issue the penalty notices but Parliament passed the Anti-Social Behaviour Act 2003.

    Pointing the finger at schools is a bit like blaming your car manufacturer if you are given a speeding ticket.
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    Yes, parents should be fined. A child's education is much more important than a holiday.


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    One week of school is hardly going to ruin things. Same with 2 weeks. They should not be fined.

    3 weeks+ is pushing it but look I know a few people have been absent from school for a various of reasons mainly medical and they come back and do well coz they caught up.
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    If parents choose to take their children on holiday at this time, then let them, they know the repercussions, if any.

    Realistically, the couple of weeks off, is hardly going to be a huge difference in the long run, especially if your child is in year 7, year 8 or at the beginning of the school year (sept-dec) where there is not really too much going on anyway. And how much do you actually rely on school compared to self study, to revise for exams?!

    I would have also thought it would be easier for the teachers as they would have less students to teach?

    There could also be additional reasons for taking the child on holiday, eg a wedding or special event, or the parents not being able to take time off work any other time.
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    (Original post by stargirl63)
    I would have also thought it would be easier for the teachers as they would have less students to teach?
    Ha! Think again.
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    Ha! Think again.
    Really? Would it not be easier for teachers if there were less children?
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    (Original post by stargirl63)
    Really? Would it not be easier for teachers if there were less children?
    Imagine you come to teach a topic that depends on prior knowledge from different areas. Tommy missed 2 weeks of this, Kiera missed 1 week of that, Sian has never understood any of this stuff as she was away in Year 9 when foundations were laid and her confidence is at rock bottom. You need to do a quick recap to help them but those who already get it are bored stiff and start to misbehave. Karl and Christian have both been taken out of class to catch up on the English controlled assessment they missed when they were on holiday. You receive an email from the Deputy Head saying she has looked at the analysis of the recent mocks and wants you to produce a detailed intervention plan showing exactly how you intend to address the various gaps in understanding for each individual in your class by the end of the week.
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    In my opinion, it isn't right to fine the parents. Surely they understand that their child is losing out on some education, so it's their loss. Their child has already lost some education - why should they have to lose some money for that as well? I do understand the other points of view, but don't I have a point?

    However, I do think that if they have already taken a week off, they should be fined for any further leisure days off.

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    Fines aren't enough of a deterrent. If there is serious evidence that taking children out of school for holidays affects their future and career prospects then parents should face jail time, not just a mere fine. If no such evidence exists, there should be no punishment for the parents.
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    Imagine you come to teach a topic that depends on prior knowledge from different areas. Tommy missed 2 weeks of this, Kiera missed 1 week of that, Sian has never understood any of this stuff as she was away in Year 9 when foundations were laid and her confidence is at rock bottom. You need to do a quick recap to help them but those who already get it are bored stiff and start to misbehave. Karl and Christian have both been taken out of class to catch up on the English controlled assessment they missed when they were on holiday. You receive an email from the Deputy Head saying she has looked at the analysis of the recent mocks and wants you to produce a detailed intervention plan showing exactly how you intend to address the various gaps in understanding for each individual in your class by the end of the week.
    Okay, I get that, that does make sense. But children are always going to be on different levels of education anyway. Bright kids will be in a class with average kids etc. Just because someone was in school, doesn't mean they understand the topic any more than someone who was away from school and caught up on the quick revision session the teacher gave. Everyone is different and I don't believe that a couple of weeks from school (especially at the beginning of the school year) is really going to make a big gap between those that learned something, those that didn't learn it, and those that could never be bothered to learn it.
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    Well with the poor education that my primary school aged brother is receiving, it would be more educational taking him on holiday than letting him sit in the classroom for a week.

    Coronation Street: The Tour was more educational than the crap he is currently being taught. They don't even correct spelling mistakes for starters, and homework is the equivalent of what I was learning in Y2, the only difference is that he is Y5. Apparently standards have slipped all across the borough.
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    Rather circumstantial. If they are taken out of school and as a consequence fall behind and the parents make no effort to get them on track, yes, if however there is no impact then it's just a petty way to get more money out of people. There was a piece in the paper saying about how back in the day, if a child was taken out of school to go on holiday they would be given the work and still be expected to do it.
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    (Original post by Numberwang)
    Given the administrative costs of sending out invoices for these fines, I'm not sure whether it makes all that much money.
    Presumably the aim is deterrence, not profit.

    I'd say generally it's for the parents to decide. Whilst I'm all for intervening for the child's benefit in appropriate circumstances, e.g. where the parent is refusing to give consent for the child to a necessary medical procedure, the starting point has to be that it is for the parents to raise the children. And the truth is whether your parents take you out of school for a couple of weeks or not will not be a significant part of your parents' influence on your educational attainment (which is inevitably huge).

    Personally I was taken out of school a fair bit, though mainly in primary school, when I wasn't learning anything particularly important.
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    Putting people in jail as has been suggested by a few seems a bit of an extreme overreaction. It's not even going to help the child learn, happening to move to a new home and possibly a new school.
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    (Original post by Numberwang)
    If it wasn't for being allowed to go on holiday in the last two weeks of term, I wouldn't have gone on holiday at all as a child - as it was all my parents could afford.
    Surely the alternative would just be less frequent holidays? Given they're a privilege, not a right, people on low incomes should be glad going on holiday at all.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Given they're a privilege, not a right, people on low incomes should be glad going on holiday at all.
    ... What?

    Holidays are neither a right nor a privilege. You have the freedom to go on holiday if you can afford to, which even people on low incomes can if they plan it right (there was a BBC documentary on very cheap holidays sometime this week). That is all.
 
 
 
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