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    There is no right answer. For some uni works, others not. It's hit and hope, not everything is within your control certainly within this country.

    I'm a mature student who has been working for a few years now. Unless you absolutely know what you want to go into, be it a builder or an electrician or a firefighter, then working is just a dead and lifeless road that leads to essentially no where.

    But I wasn't prepared for Uni when I was 18. The time is right now for me. I do think University is worth doing provided the course is right, the time is right and the preparation is right. But with the costs involved, you can't just 'go uni' anymore. You really need to evaluate whether that degree will add value to your career.

    For me having done research and so forth, I believe it will and therefore Uni is a good option for me.
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    True. But on the other hand, what if you did do a job-specific degree in, say, pharmacy, and then at the end of it decided you don't really want to work in pharmacy after all? Then you might be kinda screwed. I guess it's hard to make the right decision about degrees if you're indecisive like me, lol.
    lol its all risky i know some one who went from engineering to becoming an optician and now he is fed up being an optician now lol.. i guess life is what you make it.

    do you think graduates get enough guidance after they have graduated into what path they should consider or what might they like ?
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    (Original post by zssr)
    lol its all risky i know some one who went from engineering to becoming an optician and now he is fed up being an optician now lol.. i guess life is what you make it.

    do you think graduates get enough guidance after they have graduated into what path they should consider or what might they like ?
    I dunno, I've never been a graduate myself. Mainly cos I didn't do well enough at school to think I'd be smart enough or ready for uni. I know we certainly don't get enough guidance at school though.
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    (Original post by zssr)
    Business. .. althought im not sure where art will take ya excepy bieng an artist.

    I would also say business is sooooo popular its crazy.

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    Immigrate.

    you're british degree will be worth more elsewhere and you can live it up in the sunshine.
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    True. But on the other hand, what if you did do a job-specific degree in, say, pharmacy, and then at the end of it decided you don't really want to work in pharmacy after all? Then you might be kinda screwed. I guess it's hard to make the right decision about degrees if you're indecisive like me, lol.
    True, but surely you should only go to university if you are sure on on the ob you want to have.... 9 grand a year....
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    (Original post by jamez870)
    What degree?
    Computer science
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    (Original post by crayolaguy)
    Well I am going to uni to study maths. I'm not even thinking about what job I'm going to get I am just going to go because I love maths, that's why anyone should go. To study a subject that you really enjoy and learn more about it. Theres also the experience of being at uni and meeting new people. If you don't really like a subject then maybe you shouldn't go but it's most certainly not a waste of time and you are at a massive advantage over the people that didn't go.
    I completely agree! I would love to do a chemistry degree because I enjoy science and like the idea of meeting new people, I'd rather enjoy the life with my favourite subject and a load of new friends while having a part time job to! I recommend everyone to study further in their favourite subject and meet new people!
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    See I am currently doing a degree with the Open University and doing this has given me a. Less debt and b. Time to work and gain work experience
    But I guess it does depend what degree you do to what job you want but to be honest how many people know exactly what they want to do at 16/18 or even 21 when they graduate? And nowadays as I've worked out it's not what you know it's who you know >.<
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    (Original post by Mick.w)
    Immigrate.

    you're british degree will be worth more elsewhere and you can live it up in the sunshine.
    very good point.. im sure people would agree... but people sometimes are not willing to work outside (l) london (l). Lol
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    (Original post by zssr)
    some members of your family went for an apprenticeship ? and what are their current role and what company do they work for ?
    Aeronautical Engineer for the private jets of the rich and famous (they earn mega money in that job). Others include plumbers (manager of the company) and a Banker who works in both London and New York. All very good money. If you have the drive and are focused and don't mind starting from the bottom (and I mean tea runner haha) then you'll be fine doing an apprentice i'd say.
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    Apprenticeships aren't a silver bullet either. Apprenticeships have their own issues. They can be insanely long, restrictive and poorly paid after completion. Besides there's plenty of experience opportunities on a degree course.

    The fact is that some graduates expect too much.

    Some one who went to uni, came home every summer and finished with a 2nd probably isn't going to make much more of an apprenticeship.
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    (Original post by Stanley Winchest)
    Apprenticeships aren't a silver bullet either. Apprenticeships have their own issues. They can be insanely long, restrictive and poorly paid after completion. Besides there's plenty of experience opportunities on a degree course.

    The fact is that some graduates expect too much.

    Some one who went to uni, came home every summer and finished with a 2nd probably isn't going to make much more of an apprenticeship.
    Yes of course apps arent a silver bullet either but for example if you get proffesional recongnised certificate for that specifc field (I.e. accountancy) your better off no ?
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    (Original post by RoundTrip)
    Trust me a degree in a decent subject isn't useless. I have just completed an apprenticeship but have decided to quit my job and go uni. Yes, I got paid a decent amount and got experience but I feel I would be stuck in the same position for decades with little chance of ever progressing. A degree gives you options.

    Some guy just got a job at my place, 2:2 in mechanical engineering from de montfort, so poor grade in a good degree from a crappy uni, he has just walked in right at the top, has a company car, started on above 30k I believe and is having his masters paid for. He is also being sent abroad regularly to Switzerland and Austria for specific training. Probably has the potential to go a lot further with experience.

    Meanwhile I did an apprenticeship and have a crappy boring job with crappy hours and semi decent pay and low career progression. I am limited in where and what I can do because my training was in a really specialized field so I can't really bring any useful skills to other companies.

    Gonna work hard at uni and give it a real go. Should've done it a long time ago but we all make mistakes. Admittedly this is my own (limited) experience but apprenticeships aren't all they're cracked up to be for 99% of people and would suggest to anyone that they should take their education as far as possible because I've seen what the workplace is like if your stuck with crappy qualifications.

    This. I was put off education when I left school, and even though I did pretty well at GCSE level, I decided to work instead of going to college. I've gained plenty of experience through both paid and voluntary work and I'm pretty good at what I do work wise, but without further education I think you can end up stagnant very easily. Your options are extremely limited beyond what you already do and progression is a myth in some cases.
    I've decided to go back into education this year and pursue what I'm passionate about because I can't stand the thought of staying stuck at the current level I work at and because of the current job market, it's difficult for me to prove that I'm capable of working my way up even though I have more experience than many who have a degree. Bear in mind, my jobs have all had an okay wage and I recently rejected a job that paid around £27K a year so that I could go back to college. I was tempted, but the absolute slave driving managers can get away with now and the frustration I face in the social care sector, helped me stick to my guns and follow through with college. I'll be broke for the foreseeable future, but the passion and drive I have for the subject is keeping me going. Plus, my experience and the flexibility in social care means I can pick up shift work to keep me going financially.

    I think the best option now is to pursue what you're passionate about, because nothing will guarantee you a well paid job. It's all about making what you know work for you. As cliche as it sounds, I had to learn the hard way because after 8 years of making myself as employable as possible, the reality is I can't find a job that doesn't involve a huge amount of compromise.
    If you're passionate about making money and can work consistently hard to do so, then vocational courses are probably pretty good as they give you the right skills and experience. But if you want a mental challenge or a career that is more about learning and developing, then I definitely think uni can be beneficial. You just have to find what works for you.
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    (Original post by zssr)
    Yes of course apps arent a silver bullet either but for example if you get proffesional recongnised certificate for that specifc field (I.e. accountancy) your better off no ?
    Definitely.

    I'm not talking down apprenticeships at all. They are a fantastic opportunity for a lot of people. However, a 'Business Management in Production Forecasting with Lean Manufacture and Law Units' apprenticeship is a fantastic way for a company to keep it's wage bills down as high as supervisor/management level.

    The only reason I might seem argumentative about this is because I'm that guy with experience that business graduates moan about and from experience my experience will get me promoted before the company hires a graduate but it means nothing outside the company until I at least get some GCSEs.
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    (Original post by crayolaguy)
    Well I am going to uni to study maths. I'm not even thinking about what job I'm going to get I am just going to go because I love maths, that's why anyone should go. To study a subject that you really enjoy and learn more about it. Theres also the experience of being at uni and meeting new people. If you don't really like a subject then maybe you shouldn't go but it's most certainly not a waste of time and you are at a massive advantage over the people that didn't go.
    Nonsense. You should only go to university with an idea of employment or career goal pursuits. That is coming from someone who studied a degree that I "enjoyed" but had not opportunities of employment (or didn't enhance my employability whatsoever). If I could get funding as a poor student, I do something much more REALISTIC and SENSIBLE!
 
 
 
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