Ann Maguire 16 year old killer has been sentenced to a minimum of 20 years Watch

Moura
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#61
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#61
Someone like that who shows a complete lack of remorse and has spoken about killing others without emotion is not going to be "cured", especially not in a prison environment. That is who he is. It's not just about punishment it's about keeping other people safe. There is no way he should ever be released. That kind of behaviour at 15 means he should be tried as an adult. It's not some childish decision making that he's going to mature and grow out of. I really do not think someone like this can be rehabilitated. Yes he has some kind of psychological issues, I think they're there to stay. You can't "cure" psychopathy, it is the way a brain is and in this case he's a psychopath who wants to kill and isn't going to stop himself.
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DErasmus
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#62
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(Original post by CJKay)
Psychopaths have the highest re-offending rate of any other inmates. I am inclined to suggest they make the sentence longer.
Agreed. Disgraceful he is being let out at all. When he kills someone else, I hope they will be proud of themselves.
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Aj12
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#63
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(Original post by CJKay)
Psychopaths have the highest re-offending rate of any other inmates. I am inclined to suggest they make the sentence longer.
His sentence is only the minimum he has to serve before applying for release. By no means is there any guarantee he will be released at all.
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llys
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#64
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(Original post by Moura)
Someone like that who shows a complete lack of remorse and has spoken about killing others without emotion is not going to be "cured", especially not in a prison environment. That is who he is. It's not just about punishment it's about keeping other people safe. There is no way he should ever be released. That kind of behaviour at 15 means he should be tried as an adult. It's not some childish decision making that he's going to mature and grow out of. I really do not think someone like this can be rehabilitated. Yes he has some kind of psychological issues, I think they're there to stay. You can't "cure" psychopathy, it is the way a brain is and in this case he's a psychopath who wants to kill and isn't going to stop himself.
Exactly. Psychopaths cannot be rehabilitated. He should be in there for life, to keep other people safe.
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Everglow
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#65
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(Original post by the bear)
it solves plenty of things.
What does it solve that prison doesn't?
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the bear
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#66
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#66
(Original post by Reluire)
What does it solve that prison doesn't?
they are released from prison
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Everglow
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#67
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(Original post by the bear)
they are released from prison
After many years, yes. In cases like this, the offender may never be released. Is that not enough?
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the bear
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#68
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(Original post by Reluire)
After many years, yes. In cases like this, the offender may never be released. Is that not enough?
if they are kept behind bars until they die, without a better lifestyle than those whose lives they ruined that would be fine.
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masterridley
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#69
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I don't know if a psychopath like him can ever be rehabilitated. In which case, his sentence would be too short.
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yo radical one
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#70
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If he's spoken of a desire to commit further offences, I don't think he should ever be allowed out to be honest.
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bumblebee342
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#71
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I don't care if the sentence he's been given is longer than he's lived, I think he deserves it.

"There are no other countries within western Europe...who would give children a life sentence."

I don't think the fact that he's 15/16 is at all relevant. He may be classed as a child but he knew what he was doing. He discussed killing people, murdered his teacher and showed no remorse, so I see no problem with jailing him for 20 years.
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Charzhino
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#72
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I've read that the psychiatric report deems him not mentally ill. In which case he needs to be locked in jail forever.
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LJDRx
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#73
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I am satisfied for tax to go towards keeping him locked away until death
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CJKay
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#74
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(Original post by Aj12)
His sentence is only the minimum he has to serve before applying for release. By no means is there any guarantee he will be released at all.
I would like the guarantee that he is never released at all. Psychopaths, quite simply, should not be released, and not have any chance at release. Anyone that emotionally void whilst simultaneously dangerous should not be allowed into society.
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nulli tertius
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#75
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(Original post by Charzhino)
I've read that the psychiatric report deems him not mentally ill. In which case he needs to be locked in jail forever.
This is purely a matter of definition. The psychiatric profession has come up with a definition of mental illness where if they can't treat it, it isn't a mental illness. Imagine if an oncologist said "you don't have cancer because your tumour is inoperable"
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james22
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#76
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(Original post by CJKay)
I would like the guarantee that he is never released at all. Psychopaths, quite simply, should not be released, and not have any chance at release. Anyone that emotionally void whilst simultaneously dangerous should not be allowed into society.
If he is still dangeous in 20 years he won't be released. If he isn't then why waste money locking him up.
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CJKay
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#77
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(Original post by james22)
If he is still dangeous in 20 years he won't be released. If he isn't then why waste money locking him up.
How do you tell if a psychopath is still dangerous? There is a reason they have such a high reoffending rate, and it's because they're allowed to reoffend. The only reason most people have trouble lying through their teeth is because their conscience is arguing against it - what about people with no conscience?
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james22
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#78
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(Original post by CJKay)
How do you tell if a psychopath is still dangerous? There is a reason they have such a high reoffending rate, and it's because they're allowed to reoffend. The only reason most people have trouble lying through their teeth is because their conscience is arguing against it - what about people with no conscience?
If they are diagnosed a a psychopath then it will be much harder to be released. The parole board know everything that you are saying, they can take into account that he could be dangerous and they do not know. They should only release him when they know to a reasonable degree of certainty that he won't reoffend. If they have this certainty, he should be relased. Otherwise keep him locked up. The only thing parole allows is the chance to be evaluated to see if you are now safe.
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CJKay
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#79
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(Original post by james22)
If they are diagnosed a a psychopath then it will be much harder to be released. The parole board know everything that you are saying, they can take into account that he could be dangerous and they do not know. They should only release him when they know to a reasonable degree of certainty that he won't reoffend. If they have this certainty, he should be relased. Otherwise keep him locked up. The only thing parole allows is the chance to be evaluated to see if you are now safe.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7833672.stm

Keep them locked up. Permanently.
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james22
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(Original post by CJKay)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7833672.stm

Keep them locked up. Permanently.
All that suggests is a flaw in how paroles boards decide who to let out. It does absolutely nothing to say that they shouldn't have the chance of release. What disadvantage is there to hearing their case and letting them out if there is a significant chance of not reoffending?
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