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    (Original post by rana96)
    So, I'll be studying pharmacy in September 2015 and no matter where I go I'll be moving out of my parent's house. My parents' pre-tax income is somewhere around £66,000 meaning my maintenance loan will be around £3,500 a year and I'm not eligible for any grants.

    My problem is that my parents are leaving me on my own- They've promised that I'll not have a penny of support and I'm not going to be allowed to live at home. My maintenance loan won't even be enough to cover my accommodation costs and I'm not acc sure what to do about it.

    Does anybody have any advice or has anyone been in a similar situation? Is it worth contacting student finance or is there not much they can do for me?

    sorry if this doesn't deserve its own thread / belongs somewhere else, let me know. Thanks for any advice.
    The 3.5k student maintenance loan is based upon your parents income when you live at home during holidays, if that is not the case and you will be fully self sufficient now then the loan amount would be different, you need to speak to the student loan company for advice.
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    (Original post by TolerantBeing)
    If my family earned that much when we were younger, we would have lived comfortable, stress free lives. It's all about how you spend, and save. My family earned £30k and we were alright. Of course I'm not factoring in a decent car, posh area, and nice holiday into essentials like you probs are. Try telling a working class family that 66k isn't that much and they'll laugh in your face.


    It's not #firstworldoroblems, it's #middleclassproblems.


    Where in the UK did your family live, and did they receive any form of support from the government?

    Salaries of ca. £15,000 are below average in London and a family of four would find it difficult to make a living with that money unless they receive benefits.
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    (Original post by FeelingDepressed)
    The 3.5k student maintenance loan is based upon your parents income when you live at home during holidays, if that is not the case and you will be fully self sufficient now then the loan amount would be different, you need to speak to the student loan company for advice.
    No it's not. £3.5k is the non-income assessed amount for living away.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    No it's not. £3.5k is the non-income assessed amount for living away.
    Yes but based on your parents income. If you were out on the streets or say an older student or young adult who may have been in care and self sufficient then you would be entitled to 3862 maintenance loan and 3387 maintenance grant, the issue is whether the student loan people would agree that your parents have refused to let you live at home any longer or provide any support at all and evidencing the same to the SLC. You need to speak to them.
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    (Original post by Mr.Econometrics)
    The joys of being a university student in England; nothing quite compares.
    Of course not. In Eretria, they have students also, but what it this, comparing to being a university student in England? Nothing, nothing compares.
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    (Original post by Planckton)
    30k would be a dream for my family hahaha. we're on ~16k with 5 kids in a semi detached in a nice village, it's really not that bad, I'd say we live comfortably.
    Just teaches you the value of money, which is a concept missed by most of the spoilt middle classers that I know!
    I think it does depend on background, I think my ~45k is good money given I'm single. One housemate thinks hos similar wage is positively wealthy, another thinks it's basically the poverty line.

    The 16k must be supplemented by some benefits though? I mean, rent/mortgage on a nice semi isn't likely to be sub 300 quid, and in the South East you wouldn't see much change from a grand.
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    Just get a part time job, I swear that's what most students have to do anyway? You're not entitled to your parents money once you've reached 18. What they then give you after that is their prerogative, after all they have housed you, fed you and clothed you for all of your life, you can hardly make them out to be cruel because they won't fund your independent decision to go into university. That's the very definition of entitlement.


    Plus I agree with them, it will teach you true independence and how to budget. I've had to work all throughout university but now I know how to budget and save much better than all the people I know who got hand-outs from their parents...and who still continue to do so even in full time employment, have student debts and no savings. It's called tough love for a reason.

    Basically stop being dramatic.
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    (Original post by Like_A_G6)
    Take a gap year, and get a placement in a company like GSK (if they do one). That'll allow you to save up £8k prior to the start of University and will rocket your employment chances with the company. If you perform well, they may even allow you to take summer internships with them - that's around £1500 saved for 10 weeks worth of work after expenditures. Assuming you do a 4 year course, £8k/4 = £2k per year. This means your budget for the year is £5500 for the first year, and potentially £7k for the following three - provided you do summer internships/summer work.
    With no degree, no prior experience, and paying a rent somewhere, going to and back from work, food, clothes, how will he be able to save 8k? That's a fairy tale.
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    (Original post by Juno)
    You've got nearly a year's notice, so save up. You can make a huge fuss if you like, but your parents can't just magic up money. £66k sounds a lot, but they will have bills and you have siblings - money doesn't go as far as people think.
    My parents are somewhere around £50,000 a year (it was something like that when I was sorting out student finance) and they can afford to pay for my car insurance (£90 a month) and mobile phone contract (£30 a month), and give me a little extra every month. They've just bought a new car and my brother still lives at home with them. My maintenance loan only just covers cost of accommodation. £66k isn't as much as some think it is, but they can definitely afford to support their child through university.

    I don't think OP is going to be able to "magic up money" either. Getting a job to earn that money isn't easy, and it's not guaranteed to be successful. Unless OP already has a job, but even if he/she does finding another job once he/she moves away could also be problematic.
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    (Original post by Blaq_widow)
    Just get a part time job, I swear that's what most students have to do anyway? You're not entitled to your parents money once you've reached 18. What they then give you after that is their prerogative, after all they have housed you, fed you and clothed you for all of your life, you can hardly make them out to be cruel because they won't fund your independent decision to go into university. That's the very definition of entitlement.


    Plus I agree with them, it will teach you true independence and how to budget. I've had to work all throughout university but now I know how to budget and save much better than all the people I know who got hand-outs from their parents...and who still continue to do so even in full time employment, have student debts and no savings. It's called tough love for a reason.

    Basically stop being dramatic.
    Teaching them to budget is one thing, but OPs maintenance loan won't even cover the cost of accommodation. Refusing to provide any support in those circumstances is not teaching them "true independence", it's just stupid and unreasonable.
    OP may or may not be able to find work to earn enough money before leaving to go to university, and find another job once at university. Neither of those are guaranteed to succeed, for reasons often beyond OPs control.
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    (Original post by Chlorophile)
    My parents aren't "kicking me out" - I just think it's a teensy weensy bit out of proportion (aka utter lunacy) to expect my parents to sell the house I've lived in all my life so that I don't have any debts. It's not like I'm going into a well paid career anyway, there's no way on earth I could pay it back to them in any way shape or form. I'll probably be poorer than them.
    No, I didn't mean you, just in the general sense. You don't have to sell your house to release equity from it. I don't get the idea of paying back your parents, if you inherit your parents' house for example will you feel guilty if you haven't raised the money to have "earned" it yourself?!

    And not so you don't have any debts, just to cover the gap between the £3,500 maintenance loan and the £6,000-£6,500 it costs to survive for a year. It really is peanuts set against the appreciation alone on London property.

    Even if you were working service jobs forevermore after your degree you could just live with them for a year in London (where all the jobs are) and it would take you about 12-14 months full time to pay them the £9,000 they'd given you, even while still paying for all of your own living expenses.
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    (Original post by Blaq_widow)
    Just get a part time job, I swear that's what most students have to do anyway? You're not entitled to your parents money once you've reached 18. What they then give you after that is their prerogative, after all they have housed you, fed you and clothed you for all of your life, you can hardly make them out to be cruel because they won't fund your independent decision to go into university. That's the very definition of entitlement.
    .
    So she is not 'entitled' to her parents money post 18 but as student finance is somewhat worked out on parents earnings there is a clear expectation that parents should help their kids through uni. The argument that her parents have fed/housed/clothed her for 18 years after taking the decision the have kids is rubbish. As a parent you sign up to that & you don't suddenly stop being a parent the day they turn 18. As a parent myself I want my kids to do better than me & will do anything in my power to help the achieve their full potential. It's not like she's going off to do some fluffy degree, it sounds like she has a plan for the future with great prospects. Why any parent would want to put this is jeopardy is beyond me.



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    (Original post by Blaq_widow)
    Just get a part time job, I swear that's what most students have to do anyway? You're not entitled to your parents money once you've reached 18. What they then give you after that is their prerogative, after all they have housed you, fed you and clothed you for all of your life, you can hardly make them out to be cruel because they won't fund your independent decision to go into university. That's the very definition of entitlement.


    Plus I agree with them, it will teach you true independence and how to budget. I've had to work all throughout university but now I know how to budget and save much better than all the people I know who got hand-outs from their parents...and who still continue to do so even in full time employment, have student debts and no savings. It's called tough love for a reason.

    Basically stop being dramatic.
    They could be on the streets because the parents want to teach them a lesson, that is dramatic. I understand that they may not want to support them through uni, but to kick them out during a possible gap year is harsh IMO.

    Most if not all students I know at uni are supported by their parents and my parents earn half of that 66k value.
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    (Original post by FeelingDepressed)
    Yes but based on your parents income. If you were out on the streets or say an older student or young adult who may have been in care and self sufficient then you would be entitled to 3862 maintenance loan and 3387 maintenance grant, the issue is whether the student loan people would agree that your parents have refused to let you live at home any longer or provide any support at all and evidencing the same to the SLC. You need to speak to them.
    it's not just that, you have to be able to prove full estrangement, i..e you don't talk to your parents at all
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    it's not just that, you have to be able to prove full estrangement, i..e you don't talk to your parents at all
    Live in their house, at their expense, and - estrangement?
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    (Original post by RFowler)
    Teaching them to budget is one thing, but OPs maintenance loan won't even cover the cost of accommodation. Refusing to provide any support in those circumstances is not teaching them "true independence", it's just stupid and unreasonable.
    OP may or may not be able to find work to earn enough money before leaving to go to university, and find another job once at university. Neither of those are guaranteed to succeed, for reasons often beyond OPs control.
    Like I said, it's often the case that the maintenance loan doesn't fully cover the cost of accommodation but the excess is rarely so much that a part time job won't cover it and if that's the case, there is often cheaper accommodation available (has OP chosen the cheapest halls?).

    Some people literally have no option but to find a job, not everyone can rely on their parents. What do they do? Sorry I'm not convinced the only other option is for the OP to starve on the streets, if it comes to that I'm sure they'd help but like them, I rather doubt that would be the case.
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    (Original post by rohitbd)
    They could be on the streets because the parents want to teach them a lesson, that is dramatic. I understand that they may not want to support them through uni, but to kick them out during a possible gap year is harsh IMO.

    Most if not all students I know at uni are supported by their parents and my parents earn half of that 66k value.
    Read the above. Out on the streets? Don't make me laugh :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by lovali)
    So she is not 'entitled' to her parents money post 18 but as student finance is somewhat worked out on parents earnings there is a clear expectation that parents should help their kids through uni. The argument that her parents have fed/housed/clothed her for 18 years after taking the decision the have kids is rubbish. As a parent you sign up to that & you don't suddenly stop being a parent the day they turn 18. As a parent myself I want my kids to do better than me & will do anything in my power to help the achieve their full potential. It's not like she's going off to do some fluffy degree, it sounds like she has a plan for the future with great prospects. Why any parent would want to put this is jeopardy is beyond me.
    Help from your parents into adulthood is a privilege, not a right. I really don't get what it is you don't understand about that. What you want for your kids and how you raise them is your choice, I don't give a **** and I doubt his parents do either. In the long term, constantly bailing your kids out does not teach them survival skills so despite what some people believe it doesn't actually help.

    Let's be clear, if the OP had already tried everything in their power to no avail then my response would be completely different. But they haven't even tried and instead they're *****ing and moaning about how 'unfair' their parents are. Come back to me perhaps when the OP says they're homeless :boring:
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    (Original post by Blaq_widow)
    Help from your parents into adulthood is a privilege, not a right. I really don't get what it is you don't understand about that. What you want for your kids and how you raise them is your choice, I don't give a **** and I doubt his parents do either. In the long term, constantly bailing your kids out does not teach them survival skills so despite what some people believe it doesn't actually help.

    Let's be clear, if the OP had already tried everything in their power to no avail then my response would be completely different. But they haven't even tried and instead they're *****ing and moaning about how 'unfair' their parents are. Come back to me perhaps when the OP says they're homeless :boring:
    Actually I'm coming at this from a position of having lived financially independent since I was 16 with only myself to rely on. Not because my parents couldn't afford to keep me. The OP isn't *****ing & moaning about how unfair life is an a spoilt brat entitled way, they're simply looking for advice about how to help themselves & where to turn to for the correct advice.

    Sounds like you're bitter that no one helped you out & you've got a chip on your shoulder about perceived rich kids & their non-existent problems. Get over yourself, just because you had to do certain things why does that mean that everyone else should have to have an unnecessarily hard time while getting an education?


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    (Original post by FeelingDepressed)
    The 3.5k student maintenance loan is based upon your parents income when you live at home during holidays, if that is not the case and you will be fully self sufficient now then the loan amount would be different, you need to speak to the student loan company for advice.
    Utter gibberish.
    You could not be more wrong!
 
 
 

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