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    (Original post by elaras)
    SUPER late to this but I applied to Yale, Harvard, Brown, Cornell, and UChicago. Had interviews at all apart from Cornell. 2200 SAT score, 8A* 4A 1B at GCSE, 4As at AS (and predicted 3A* at A2 plus an A* in EPQ). Some good ECs etc. I ended up only applying for FA at Yale and Harvard (I'm a US citizen even though I've never lived there so I think that was easier for me than you guys) bc they're the only two I'd consider over Cambridge at this point, but it's incredibly unlikely I'd get into either of those
    Well done on Cambridge and good luck with Harvard and Yale!
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    (Original post by elaras)
    SUPER late to this but I applied to Yale, Harvard, Brown, Cornell, and UChicago. Had interviews at all apart from Cornell. 2200 SAT score, 8A* 4A 1B at GCSE, 4As at AS (and predicted 3A* at A2 plus an A* in EPQ). Some good ECs etc. I ended up only applying for FA at Yale and Harvard (I'm a US citizen even though I've never lived there so I think that was easier for me than you guys) bc they're the only two I'd consider over Cambridge at this point, but it's incredibly unlikely I'd get into either of those
    Good job, those are pretty good scores. Why do you say that it's unlikely? I understand that it's competitive but if what you've listed is all true then you should not have problems. Good luck. While I'm here with a 1955 or something score on my SAT, I'm the one that needs to worry.
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    (Original post by sagar448)
    Good job, those are pretty good scores. Why do you say that it's unlikely? I understand that it's competitive but if what you've listed is all true then you should not have problems. Good luck. While I'm here with a 1955 or something score on my SAT, I'm the one that needs to worry.
    I just don't feel I have anything that particularly makes me stand out? Like ik a girl with pretty similar academic stats for me who's also national level fencer who got deferred from yale scea
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    (Original post by elaras)
    I just don't feel I have anything that particularly makes me stand out? Like ik a girl with pretty similar academic stats for me who's also national level fencer who got deferred from yale scea
    I have to get into a rant with this, because it really bothers me. But if there is anything that you must know about the American education system, it is that it really isn't fair. In the public schools (Kindergarten-12), oftentimes money goes to the schools which have the higher tests scores. I am completely against standardized testing because teachers have to push new topics on us quickly just to meet a test deadline, and we don't really get to go in-depth on the subject. Plus, some people are not good with testing, especially in a certain period of time. I got advanced scores on two of the state math tests, but only because they gave me unlimited time and I think I spent 2.5 hours on each (I was the last student in the room for both). Inner-city schools seem to have it the worst though, because they don't get a lot of funding, and sometimes the teachers aren't sure how to teach the kids. The inner-city schools usually have the kids from the poverty level and with discipline problems, and not all of the teachers know how to handle it. There are some schools and teachers that do a fantastic job at this, however.
    But then you get to the collegiate level of the American education system, and it is still pretty messed up. The amount of student loan debt is astronomically high, as tuition prices keep rising, and students have a hard time finding jobs after graduation, due to corporations moving overseas or not a lot of jobs in their field, etc. You have some of the best universities in the world in the US but those most deserving to attend don't get in because of limited spots, or don't get to go because of the cost. Scholarships are far and few between, even though people will tell you they are plentiful. They are hard to come by, at least the private ones. The merit ones are the easiest to attain.
    The really sorry part is that the elite schools are so exclusive that no one really knows how the students get picked to attend. I personally think that some get in just because of who their parents are or if their parent/grandparent attended that college. But you have thousands of students, the smartest ones in the pack, applying to a select few group of colleges, that only have enough spots for a couple thousand freshman a year, and it honestly isn't surprising that many people are left wondering why they didn't get in. I think some schools even have a "point system", which is totally messed up. So, look into some public schools with good merit aid and that offer any help to international students. American colleges are wanting to bring in more and more international students, so asking for help will not hurt. And most public universities have honors programs that allow you to take smaller, more individualized classes, with the more educated professors. They often have honors housing as well, so you can live with people who have similar interests and studying habits as you. Also, you will probably get more of the American experience at these schools. Poor, middle class, and rich kids attend, and they're from all walks of life, with varying political ideas and cultures.
    But, for all its faults, the education system has its pluses, and you won't receive an education like it anywhere else. And make sure the student life atmosphere is what you want. There is more learning in a university than just in the classroom. Sometimes the most important lessons are those that you learn while hanging with your friends over dinner or something.
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    (Original post by MarchingBand2015)
    I have to get into a rant with this, because it really bothers me. But if there is anything that you must know about the American education system, it is that it really isn't fair. In the public schools (Kindergarten-12), oftentimes money goes to the schools which have the higher tests scores. I am completely against standardized testing because teachers have to push new topics on us quickly just to meet a test deadline, and we don't really get to go in-depth on the subject. Plus, some people are not good with testing, especially in a certain period of time. I got advanced scores on two of the state math tests, but only because they gave me unlimited time and I think I spent 2.5 hours on each (I was the last student in the room for both). Inner-city schools seem to have it the worst though, because they don't get a lot of funding, and sometimes the teachers aren't sure how to teach the kids. The inner-city schools usually have the kids from the poverty level and with discipline problems, and not all of the teachers know how to handle it. There are some schools and teachers that do a fantastic job at this, however.
    But then you get to the collegiate level of the American education system, and it is still pretty messed up. The amount of student loan debt is astronomically high, as tuition prices keep rising, and students have a hard time finding jobs after graduation, due to corporations moving overseas or not a lot of jobs in their field, etc. You have some of the best universities in the world in the US but those most deserving to attend don't get in because of limited spots, or don't get to go because of the cost. Scholarships are far and few between, even though people will tell you they are plentiful. They are hard to come by, at least the private ones. The merit ones are the easiest to attain.
    The really sorry part is that the elite schools are so exclusive that no one really knows how the students get picked to attend. I personally think that some get in just because of who their parents are or if their parent/grandparent attended that college. But you have thousands of students, the smartest ones in the pack, applying to a select few group of colleges, that only have enough spots for a couple thousand freshman a year, and it honestly isn't surprising that many people are left wondering why they didn't get in. I think some schools even have a "point system", which is totally messed up. So, look into some public schools with good merit aid and that offer any help to international students. American colleges are wanting to bring in more and more international students, so asking for help will not hurt. And most public universities have honors programs that allow you to take smaller, more individualized classes, with the more educated professors. They often have honors housing as well, so you can live with people who have similar interests and studying habits as you. Also, you will probably get more of the American experience at these schools. Poor, middle class, and rich kids attend, and they're from all walks of life, with varying political ideas and cultures.
    But, for all its faults, the education system has its pluses, and you won't receive an education like it anywhere else. And make sure the student life atmosphere is what you want. There is more learning in a university than just in the classroom. Sometimes the most important lessons are those that you learn while hanging with your friends over dinner or something.
    I don't know about the rest of the folks in the thread thread but personally I'm only able to apply to the really competitive schools since they're the only ones offering generous international financial aid as I could not by any means fund myself through (My family has no savings and little income), so they're pretty much all private

    I'm hoping that even one of the 11 will accept me but realistically I can't see that happening with my lack of stellar ECs, financial need and just the competitiveness of the schools
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    (Original post by anunoriginaluser)
    I don't know about the rest of the folks in the thread thread but personally I'm only able to apply to the really competitive schools since they're the only ones offering generous international financial aid as I could not by any means fund myself through (My family has no savings and little income), so they're pretty much all private

    I'm hoping that even one of the 11 will accept me but realistically I can't see that happening with my lack of stellar ECs, financial need and just the competitiveness of the schools
    Wait. Hold up. You don't have to worry about your financial need playing a part in your admissions. Most of the really competitive schools have need-blind aid, meaning that they won't consider your financial need when accepting you. They will probably give you lots of money when you do get in.
    And I wish you luck!!!! But really, look up schools with good merit aid. Even with an ACT of 30, you can get your tuition alone paid for, and at some schools, maybe even more.You just have to make sure the aid isn't just for in-state students, and includes out-of-state and international.
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    (Original post by MarchingBand2015)
    Wait. Hold up. You don't have to worry about your financial need playing a part in your admissions. Most of the really competitive schools have need-blind aid, meaning that they won't consider your financial need when accepting you. They will probably give you lots of money when you do get in.
    And I wish you luck!!!! But really, look up schools with good merit aid. Even with an ACT of 30, you can get your tuition alone paid for, and at some schools, maybe even more. Do a google search of schools with the best merit aid. I am pretty sure these still apply to international students.
    Nah, for internationals the need blind schools stop at HYP MIT Amherst and Dartmouth

    I've checked around for merit aid but didn't find any that would cover the whole deal and since I wouldn't be eligible for student finance and I think it'd be best to avoid private bank loans like the plague wherever possible there's pretty much nowhere that'd be able to help :c

    It's too late now anyway I guess; late Feb :P I'll just cross my fingers and hope for the best come April; thanks for the good luck though!
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    Guys, MIT decisions release on the 14th march. Im really scared.
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    (Original post by sagar448)
    Didnt see any forum topic for UK to USA uni applications.

    Hi guys talk here about the universities in US you have applied for and how far you have reached.

    I applied to MIT, Harvard, Stanford, Yale, CALTech and Princeton. I have had an interview from Harvard, MIT and Yale.

    Got 3As and a B at AS. Predicted 2A* and A.

    What about you guys??
    Let us know how you do come April!


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    I just got a really lovely email from Cornell saying that the admissions folk had nominated me for a scholarship! I'm absolutely beaming but apparently some internationals have had this in the past and were given an offer of admission but still weren't offered any aid because it's so limited for intl.s, so I'm still keeping my expectations low
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    (Original post by anunoriginaluser)
    I just got a really lovely email from Cornell saying that the admissions folk had nominated me for a scholarship! I'm absolutely beaming but apparently some internationals have had this in the past and were given an offer of admission but still weren't offered any aid because it's so limited for intl.s, so I'm still keeping my expectations low
    CONGRATS!!!
    I just got into UChicago with a merit scholarship so great day all around !
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    (Original post by elaras)
    CONGRATS!!!
    I just got into UChicago with a merit scholarship so great day all around !
    Oh wow well done!!! Is UChicago your first choice or have you got more waiting to do?

    That's really great though! Glad to hear
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    Really good job guys, well done. I just hope I hear some good news tomorrow from MIT. I'm really scared, I can't even sleep.
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    (Original post by anunoriginaluser)
    Oh wow well done!!! Is UChicago your first choice or have you got more waiting to do?

    That's really great though! Glad to hear
    More waiting until the dreaded Ivy Day I'm afraid - hbu?
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    (Original post by elaras)
    More waiting until the dreaded Ivy Day I'm afraid - hbu?
    Yup; same! Waiting on 5 ivies :') Cornell sounds promising though, so I'm a bit more relaxed and looking forward to it rather than dreading it than I was previously.
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    (Original post by sagar448)
    Really good job guys, well done. I just hope I hear some good news tomorrow from MIT. I'm really scared, I can't even sleep.
    Did you make it?
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    (Original post by MarchingBand2015)
    You have some of the best universities in the world in the US but those most deserving to attend don't get in because of limited spots, or don't get to go because of the cost. Scholarships are far and few between, even though people will tell you they are plentiful. They are hard to come by, at least the private ones. The merit ones are the easiest to attain.
    Let's address some problems here. Because your post is incredibly problematic and actually hugely ignorant of American educational practice.

    The elite schools in the US give the most generous financial aid of any schools on the planet. Read that sentence again. Because they are so obscenely wealthy, they are the most generous. Families from poverty pay nothing for their children to attend. That's right, poor students at elite schools have their tuition, housing, food and books paid by the endowment fund.

    The amount of need-based financial aid that a student receives is dependent on their family income - the elite schools don't give merit aid because all applicants would be deserving of merit aid.

    The really sorry part is that the elite schools are so exclusive that no one really knows how the students get picked to attend.
    Why is that bad? Because so many students apply and the universities have limited spots, they need to choose applicants. How would you choose among equally qualified candidates? There isn't some formula that these schools use, they review every file and slowly make decisions and reduce the size of the pile. It's not an easy job.

    I think some schools even have a "point system", which is totally messed up.
    Point systems are illegal.

    So, look into some public schools with good merit aid and that offer any help to international students.
    Worst advice ever. The public universities are, compared the elite privates, poor. They give very little financial aid, even to US home students.

    You seem to actually know very little about the US educational system and financial aid, please do not give advice to students when you don't know what you're talking about.
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    (Original post by Genghis_Khan)
    Did you make it?
    Sadly, no. I did not make it. :C
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    (Original post by NYU2012)
    Point systems are illegal.
    What's a points system?


    (Original post by sagar448)
    Sadly, no. I did not make it. :C

    Sorry man ( Good luck with the rest of your applications! Keep your head up
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    (Original post by anunoriginaluser)
    What's a points system?
    Point-based systems were admissions systems which universities used to rank students. Actually, it's very similar to UCAS points. US Universities aren't allowed to give mathematical weight to SAT scores, race, gender, GPA, etc. in order to make a decision. Essentially, you cannot plug students into a formula to see if they get in or not.

    EDIT: See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gratz_v._Bollinger
    The US Supreme Court ruled that points-based systems resemble quotas, and are therefore unconstitutional.
 
 
 
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