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    Not Bristol. That's about all I can give you really.
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    (Original post by redferry)
    Not Bristol. That's about all I can give you really.
    Why's that?

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    (Original post by FreyaGreaves)
    Why's that?

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    They were really really unsupportive of my boyfriend when he had anxiety attacks until the point he was suicide :\

    Its a very high pressure uni I would say.

    Mind you they were good when I blended my hand.
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    (Original post by redferry)
    They were really really unsupportive of my boyfriend when he had anxiety attacks until the point he was suicide :\

    Its a very high pressure uni I would say.

    Mind you they were good when I blended my hand.
    Oh dear, that's not nice
    Blended your hand?? Haha

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    (Original post by FreyaGreaves)
    That sounds lovely! Were the SU quite active and were there many societies and activities to join in with?
    The Student Union are extremely active. Despite being one the smallest SUs they have one the highest levels of student participation. I think they currently have over 100 clubs and societies - all the generic ones of course but also things like High Tea Society, Quidditch, EcoSoc, Book Clubs, an LGBTQ Society and tons of water sports to get involved with.
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    Lets face it - NO University is a good place for anyone with 'anxiety issues'.

    Get that sorted first - and THEN go to Uni.
    You'll have a much happier - and more successful - time.

    Where does it say that you can only go to Uni straight from school?
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    There are a lot if suggestions for rural, campus unis here. Which might suit you but it's worth remembering that that sort of insular, isolated environment might not suit you. Personally I found the culture shock from moving from a northern city to the extremely insular environment of royal holloway was extreme enough to make me very unhappy.

    Add in that the RH campus is deserted at the weekends when everyone heads back home to london and there's a potential to end up unhappy, unwell and isolated.

    For me a uni with better transport links and closer links to a city environment made me feel much more comfortable and supported. Universities like cardiff, birmingham and southampton all have this sort of setup.

    Going to uni is a big move. Placing yourself in an environment where you feel supported is about more than just how nice a campus feels on a visit day. Living day in day out is very different to a day trip (and is one of the big mistakes applicants can make that lead to then choosing the wrong uni for them).

    I would strongly recommend that you try to get involved in some summer school/residential uni visit activities if you can before applying.

    When you do apply then again I'd recommend asking to stay in halls when invited to visit. Give yourself more time while visiting to get a feel for a uni. Visit the local shops, the SU if you can, talk to the support services as well as just finding out about the course. If you can see if you can sit in on a lecture or seminar.

    History in particular tends to be a BIG course. In first yr at most unis delivery is likely to be in large lectures with 100+ students. That makes making friends with your coursemates more of a challenge. So again try to find out about the histsoc to see if you can use that as a source of course friends and academic peer support.
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    (Original post by sydneybridge)
    Lets face it - NO University is a good place for anyone with 'anxiety issues'.

    Get that sorted first - and THEN go to Uni.
    You'll have a much happier - and more successful - time.

    Where does it say that you can only go to Uni straight from school?
    Get that sorted? You've very obviously never had anxiety issues. It's not as simple as 'getting it sorted'. It's often more a case of having it under control, which I do. I just want to know which unis will be most supportive should my problems arise, as that is a possibility.
    I am not going to put my life on hold because of these issues and you never know, it could even be the best thing for me!

    I never said I wanted to go straight from college either.

    I know you're trying to be helpful, but it's not really. This is stuff I can think about and discuss with my family, my college, my doctor, and the universities I look at, who will know and understand far more about my situation than you do.
    Thanks for your concern, but I made this thread in order to discuss the support available within different universities, not this.
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    (Original post by PQ)
    There are a lot if suggestions for rural, campus unis here. Which might suit you but it's worth remembering that that sort of insular, isolated environment might not suit you. Personally I found the culture shock from moving from a northern city to the extremely insular environment of royal holloway was extreme enough to make me very unhappy.

    Add in that the RH campus is deserted at the weekends when everyone heads back home to london and there's a potential to end up unhappy, unwell and isolated.

    For me a uni with better transport links and closer links to a city environment made me feel much more comfortable and supported. Universities like cardiff, birmingham and southampton all have this sort of setup.

    Going to uni is a big move. Placing yourself in an environment where you feel supported is about more than just how nice a campus feels on a visit day. Living day in day out is very different to a day trip (and is one of the big mistakes applicants can make that lead to then choosing the wrong uni for them).

    I would strongly recommend that you try to get involved in some summer school/residential uni visit activities if you can before applying.

    When you do apply then again I'd recommend asking to stay in halls when invited to visit. Give yourself more time while visiting to get a feel for a uni. Visit the local shops, the SU if you can, talk to the support services as well as just finding out about the course. If you can see if you can sit in on a lecture or seminar.

    History in particular tends to be a BIG course. In first yr at most unis delivery is likely to be in large lectures with 100+ students. That makes making friends with your coursemates more of a challenge. So again try to find out about the histsoc to see if you can use that as a source of course friends and academic peer support.
    This is all really useful advice, thank you
    I don't think isolated and rural would bother me since I've lived in a rural area all my life, so I think I'd find that okay. Being alone has never really bothered me.

    Do most unis do these residential visits/summer school things? Because that sounds like a good idea
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    (Original post by FreyaGreaves)
    I'm currently doing my AS levels, and am only really just starting to think about which university I would like to go to.

    I have struggled with anxiety and various other mental health issues for a number of years, and I was wondering which universities would be most supportive?
    Stay at home and commute, unless you're not *that* anxious. In which case, stop panicking and learn to adapt once you get there.
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    (Original post by ninaballet)
    I agree with Royal Holloway.

    Also agree with collegiate unis, I'm at York and from what I've experienced the support system's really good. We have a post-graduate student living in every block who's on call throughout Freshers to help you settle in, and the college team are really good too. There's someone in my flat doing History and he seems to like the department and course.
    Why Royal Holloway?
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    (Original post by llacerta)
    Whilst I have never been diagnosed with anxiety, I have suffered from it in the past, and I found Royal Holloway to be very helpful- despite no 'official' diagnosis, even. Plus it's the sort of university that in and of itself tends to be a calming place; the small, pretty campus and great community mean that you have this feeling of safety and homeliness that larger, city-based universities struggle to emulate.

    I also agree with the suggestion of collegiate universities, though I'm not sure I'd recommend Oxford or Cambridge, despite the collegiate systems meaning that both have a strong community feel. I actually think the university (referring to Oxford here) is relatively poor at dealing with mental health issues, so other collegiate universities like Durham and York might be nice alternatives.
    Again why RHU? And is Oxford really that poor at dealing with mental health issues?
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    (Original post by HigherMinion)
    Stay at home and commute, unless you're not *that* anxious. In which case, stop panicking and learn to adapt once you get there.
    I am looking for real, honest, helpful advice and insights. This is not.

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    (Original post by Jen92)
    The Student Union are extremely active. Despite being one the smallest SUs they have one the highest levels of student participation. I think they currently have over 100 clubs and societies - all the generic ones of course but also things like High Tea Society, Quidditch, EcoSoc, Book Clubs, an LGBTQ Society and tons of water sports to get involved with.
    That all sounds great!

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    (Original post by FreyaGreaves)
    I am looking for real, honest, helpful advice and insights. This is not.

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    Well it's certainly honest, and I know both kinds of people who stayed with their families and commuted, and some who braved it. Sure, there were a few attacks during the first week; you're out of your comfort zone, after all. But who isn't?

    The money you save on accommodation you can spend on transport. Easy.
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    I went to Nottingham btw, and I have to say I wouldnt recommend there. The counsellors/etc were dire. I often volunteered for Nightline and people turned to us as a "last resort" because campus GPs and so on were crap.
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    (Original post by FreyaGreaves)
    I am looking for real, honest, helpful advice and insights. This is not.

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    He's a GCSE student tbh yeah :lol:
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    (Original post by HigherMinion)
    Well it's certainly honest, and I know both kinds of people who stayed with their families and commuted, and some who braved it. Sure, there were a few attacks during the first week; you're out of your comfort zone, after all. But who isn't?

    The money you save on accommodation you can spend on transport. Easy.
    Real and helpful, less so then?

    Unfortunately in my situation I can't do that, as I don't really live within commuting distance of any good unis. 'Braving it' is what I intend to do.

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    (Original post by HarryDn)
    I went to Nottingham btw, and I have to say I wouldnt recommend there. The counsellors/etc were dire. I often volunteered for Nightline and people turned to us as a "last resort" because campus GPs and so on were crap.
    Oh dear! I hope they improve on that in future then

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    I don't have loads of experience of other universities but I can tell you that Lancaster is great for this kind of thing. It's a very calming place and campus (especially for me) and we also have a lot of provisions for issues like this (counselling, welfare officers etc., as soon as you mention your own welfare the university does everything it can to help you).
 
 
 
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