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    I don't know why people study dance at university. If you want to be a professional dancer surely its better to go off to some dance academy or something.
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    (Original post by Smash Bandicoot)
    Can you give me directions to this place, I got lost by the second star to the right
    Just remember second star to the right and straight on till morning! Also I think im gonna make a disney thread on here for all the mouse-obsessed people like me

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    (Original post by Smash Bandicoot)
    Mine is Disney Studies.
    See this sounds like something which would be subdivided from a larger course, or at least something relating to a dissertation question. For instance my course is in scriptwriting and I did my dissertation on James Cameron as a director, but if the course was literally James Cameron Studies BA Hons that would be stupid.

    What's also stupid is that most of these sorts of things you can do Disney studies as part of another course, as an example, such as production or narrative or artistic like animation. Even my course involves us in other aspects like film and TV production, these Mickey Mouse degrees are probably just incredibly stagnant and limited.
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    (Original post by Snagprophet)
    See this sounds like something which would be subdivided from a larger course, or at least something relating to a dissertation question. For instance my course is in scriptwriting and I did my dissertation on James Cameron as a director, but if the course was literally James Cameron Studies BA Hons that would be stupid.

    What's also stupid is that most of these sorts of things you can do Disney studies as part of another course, as an example, such as production or narrative or artistic like animation. Even my course involves us in other aspects like film and TV production, these Mickey Mouse degrees are probably just incredibly stagnant and limited.
    not sure if baiting obvious roll bread or srs

    Honestly I just fancied making a joke and now I've made it Popular Threads hahah

    like a lot of my threads
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    It's hilarious that people are genuinely debating my drunken joke but carry on
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    Mickey Mouse degree - any degree you'll spend more money studying then you will earn as a direct result of studying it.

    Example, all loans considered (tuition fee, maintenance, the lot), my degree cost me in the region of £22,000. I've been in a related graduate job for nearly three years, I've earned considerably more than £22,000 so far, therefore my degree was not Mickey Mouse.
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    (Original post by sherlockfan)
    I did provide you with the names of several degrees that are meaningless, but of course there will always be people who think they are worth pursuing, yourself included, so the point is moot.
    And i do blame the universities for the proliferation of qualifications that are meaningless, also the fact that almost anyone can get into university these days means that degrees are not as valuable as they used to be.
    I tell you I gained no insight at all into that subject, and if I ever did it was useless and quickly forgotten.
    So, no skills developed during your degree? If you consider a degree as merely a mechanism to acquire knowledge, facts, you miss the point of one of its main benefits.

    I graduated with a humanities degree a long time ago. Career wise virtually none of the "facts" I learned as part of that process have been used, nobody at work really wants me to explain the imagery of Donne's poetry, or discuss the causes of the American civil war. However nearly every day the skills I honed, of being able to marshall facts, arrange my thoughts, weight up the pros and cons of a particular path, evaluate the risks and rewards and then express my views in a hopefully cogent manner have been used.
    I don't apply these skills to the humanities, I apply them to accountancy, tax and some legal issues, the career I developed post my first degree.

    The only practical application of the facts/knowledge from my degree is that I sometimes get a cheese playing Trivial Pursuits and have once or twice got over ten University Challenge questions correct. (However for me it would be a much better show if they would drop all the science, maths and geography questions- also some of the music and Art ones as well)
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    (Original post by DJKL)
    So, no skills developed during your degree? If you consider a degree as merely a mechanism to acquire knowledge, facts, you miss the point of one of its main benefits.

    I graduated with a humanities degree a long time ago. Career wise virtually none of the "facts" I learned as part of that process have been used, nobody at work really wants me to explain the imagery of Donne's poetry, or discuss the causes of the American civil war. However nearly every day the skills I honed, of being able to marshall facts, arrange my thoughts, weight up the pros and cons of a particular path, evaluate the risks and rewards and then express my views in a hopefully cogent manner have been used.
    I don't apply these skills to the humanities, I apply them to accountancy, tax and some legal issues, the career I developed post my first degree.

    The only practical application of the facts/knowledge from my degree is that I sometimes get a cheese playing Trivial Pursuits and have once or twice got over ten University Challenge questions correct. (However for me it would be a much better show if they would drop all the science, maths and geography questions- also some of the music and Art ones as well)
    Nope, i dropped out. Tbf i dont think i was cut out for it.
    Good for you though.
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    (Original post by sherlockfan)
    x
    Where did you study psychology?

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    (Original post by beaverhausen)
    Where did you study psychology?

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    kent university.
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    Psychology degree holder checking in to defend my career :ahee: I love my job and make a practical difference to lives. If I don't turn up in the morning, it matters. My degree gave me the foundation to learn to make a difference.

    YMMV, of course. It's not for everyone, but it's definitely not pointless.
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    (Original post by HigherMinion)
    http://www.tomsguide.com/us/StarCraf...news-3389.html

    http://english.rice.edu/Content.aspx?id=2147483658

    You can get a degree in gaming now. (playing, not building). This is the height of "mickey mouse".
    No it isn't. This is perfect evidence of someone claiming a degree is Mickey Mouse because they do not understand the true meaning of the course. The course isn't 'playing games' as you claimed at all. Its actually in the department of English and uses the fantasy world of games to look at the psychological impact of those virtual realities. A degree isn't Mickey Mouse just because you cant or wont put in enough time or effort to see what it truly entails.
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    (Original post by A Mysterious Lord)
    Mickey Mouse degree - any degree you'll spend more money studying then you will earn as a direct result of studying it.

    Example, all loans considered (tuition fee, maintenance, the lot), my degree cost me in the region of £22,000. I've been in a related graduate job for nearly three years, I've earned considerably more than £22,000 so far, therefore my degree was not Mickey Mouse.
    Using your logic any degree has the capacity to be Mickey Mouse and any degree has the capacity to not be Mickey Mouse. There are people who've got all sorts of degrees who are earning all sorts of different levels of income. I know psychology students earning ridiculous amounts of money. I know former law students who are doing the same as they have their own partnerships now after years of training. I can name people who went to good universities but due to their own laziness have done nothing other than stay at home after university with their parents. Also, one does not need a graduate job related to their degree to prove its worthwhile.

    Basically, your logic suggests that its entirely down to the person in question as to whether their degree ends up worthwhile. This is true. Show the correct attitude and aptitude and employers or the banks in the forms of loans for a business will take a chance on you. If you don't then they won't. Your degree didn't guarantee you a job. You worked hard to obtain that graduate position whether that was through interview processes or assessment centres. There are many graduate recruiters who'll take from any subject whatsoever. Those that obtain the best positions do so because they're suitable as a person for that role.
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    (Original post by zippity.doodah)
    liberal arts and women's/gender studies
    I'm curious, what are the liberal arts?
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    (Original post by PangXie)
    Psychology degree holder checking in to defend my career :ahee: I love my job and make a practical difference to lives. If I don't turn up in the morning, it matters. My degree gave me the foundation to learn to make a difference.

    YMMV, of course. It's not for everyone, but it's definitely not pointless.
    can I ask what it is that you do?
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    (Original post by mackemforever)
    Unless your degree has an obvious and substantial effect on your career then it is not worth the paper it's written on.
    Some people go to university to gain knowledge of a subject they're interested in as opposed for career related purposes. All of what you posted is merely your own opinion and not based on any fact. Without the arts and humanities, areas many people look down upon, the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematical areas would be boring and bland. The arts and humanities are what took computers from outdated technological slabs to aesthetically pleasing iPad's and Macbook Pro's. This has been proven time and time again and why the concept of STEAM has been put about as a possible replacement for STEM. I for one am fed up of this backward thinking that certain degrees are worthless unless they contribute to someones career and I did a STEM degree but I know fully well that without the humanities and the arts especially, the field of technology would be the most bland and depressing area to work in without a doubt.
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    (Original post by Lord Baelish)
    No it isn't. This is perfect evidence of someone claiming a degree is Mickey Mouse because they do not understand the true meaning of the course. The course isn't 'playing games' as you claimed at all. Its actually in the department of English and uses the fantasy world of games to look at the psychological impact of those virtual realities. A degree isn't Mickey Mouse just because you cant or wont put in enough time or effort to see what it truly entails.
    So, you think gaming and arts degrees are worth 27k. What did you take?
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    (Original post by HigherMinion)
    So, you think gaming and arts degrees are worth 27k. What did you take?
    Internet Computing.
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    (Original post by HigherMinion)
    http://www.tomsguide.com/us/StarCraf...news-3389.html

    http://english.rice.edu/Content.aspx?id=2147483658

    You can get a degree in gaming now. (playing, not building). This is the height of "mickey mouse".

    First link:

    You're not getting graded on your skill at the game. You're being rated at your understanding of macro-management within video game metas as well as your ability to predict the behaviour of participants in the game. It's basically economic's game theory combined with sports psychology. I've studied this all informally myself. It's very interesting and it has applications in all other sports and even business with calculating risk and the actions of other firms in markets.

    Second link:

    Well, this one is a bit niche. It's essentially english literature + english language + culture studies + game design. Seems pretty useful actually for a class, not for an entire degree of course.

    The use of the word "paradigm" made me cringe though.
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    (Original post by Dr. Oxford)
    Loose attempt at being funny.
    In my eyes, all jobs are respectable in that if no one did the crappiest and toughest tasks, our society would crumble within minutes!
    They're not the same thing though are they. There are lots of jobs that are undervalued (i.e. the crappiest and toughest ones), but that doesn't mean that all jobs are respectable.
 
 
 
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