"Strong", "independent" feminist women terrorised by clapping! Really!? Watch

idontevenbeth
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#61
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#61
(Original post by ParadoxSocks)
It also gives speakers the opportunity to give their speeches without disruption while still getting feedback from the audience. If you don't agree with the safe space arguments then surely you can agree that being able to say what you want to say is definitely a good thing?

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Agreed! Another really good point, I'm not a huge fan of clapping myself because my voice is quite small. Being able to say what you want to say is great!
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idontevenbeth
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#62
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(Original post by elfess)
Yeah this is nothing to do with the fact that they're women or feminists. It's to show respect for people with anxiety disorders who might get triggered by loud sounds such as clapping.

Yes! I'm both woman and feminist, however I would try my best to respect those who have any fears of any gender or belief!
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idontevenbeth
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
So if I have a fear of people coming together at a conference for instance, should that conference be cancelled out of respect for me?
Of course I'd assume you would avoid the conference, just like how people at the conference are avoiding clapping
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EmergencyBagels
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#64
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it does sound odd but maybe they have specific members of the group who have reported this and are just being respectful? this would be a weird thing to come up with without any prompting.
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by idontevenbeth)
Of course I'd assume you would avoid the conference, just like how people at the conference are avoiding clapping
No, I should not have to avoid doing anything, people should panda to my every will.
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bolly_mad
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#66
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#66
Yeah! Jazz hands!!!!!!
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KingStannis
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#67
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You cannot encourage this, and think that you're encouraging women to go into powerful leadership roles. If they can't handle clapping, how on earth would they deal with the boos, jeers and banter that gets thrown at you in the House of Commons:




What the hell are they thinking? ****ing ridiculous.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kqtANltepC4
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HandmadeTurnip
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(Original post by idontevenbeth)
Of course I'd assume you would avoid the conference, just like how people at the conference are avoiding clapping
You still haven't answered my question from earlier.
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idontevenbeth
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#69
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(Original post by HandmadeTurnip)
Nobody really understands mental health, even those that are most informed about it. I have issues with anxiety myself, which can be triggered by some things that would seem perfectly innocuous to most people. I would never dream of asking people to avoid doing these things, it wouldn't benefit anyone. If anything, coming into frequent contact with these situations is healthy as it helps me get used to them.

I would also argue if someone's psychological problems are particularly severe, they shouldn't really be going to conferences anyway. You wouldn't advise someone with a broken leg to go skiing without first giving themselves time to heal and recuperate, why should a mental health problem be any different?

Out of interest, what's your stance on universities being made into 'safe spaces', i.e. not allowing certain speakers or topics of discussion on campus that may offend or distress people?
I used to have extreme phone anxiety, however by forcing myself to talk to people on the phone I'm much better. I still shake a little when talking and have to sometimes write out a script. However, if anyone forced me to talk on the phone without me mentally preparing I really think that would worry me. Some people aren't ready to recover, and that's okay! Maybe a lot of the people at the talk (or someone actually doing the talking) are sensitive, however it doesn't mean they shouldn't be included in everyday opportunities.

Interestingly enough, I was researching Oreo for my graphics project. I found out that in order for Oreo to be declared as Kosher, they had to spend something like £300,000 on each oven to be cleaned by a rabbi. Why would they spend so much if a) People who only eat kosher can just avoid oreos, and b) it costs so much and changes the recipe for everyone else? You can come to your own conclusions on that one, but it's just a thought.


I think if a speak says what it's about (eg. animal abuse, feminism, domestic violence. ect) then that should tell a person whether they can attend or not. Freedom of speech is a right, freedom of clapping isn't
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idontevenbeth
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(Original post by EmergencyBagels)
it does sound odd but maybe they have specific members of the group who have reported this and are just being respectful? this would be a weird thing to come up with without any prompting.
Maybe! Sometimes the speakers request things, who knows
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idontevenbeth
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(Original post by KingStannis)
You cannot encourage this, and think that you're encouraging women to go into powerful leadership roles. If they can't handle clapping, how on earth would they deal with the boos, jeers and banter that gets thrown at you in the House of Commons:




What the hell are they thinking? ****ing ridiculous.

The conference wasn't just for women.
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Wade-
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#72
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(Original post by idontevenbeth)
It's more likely (like.. a billion times more likely...) that they'll be people sensitive to loud noise in that talk. Maybe the people giving the talk themselves may be sensitive to loud noise so they've asked for minimal noise.
When I went on summer camp, there was one girl out of the 800 people who attended who had a very severe peanut allergy, so nobody could purchase or have a peanut product on them throughout the whole trip. There was a few grumbles and moans, but everyone knew that it was okay.
And I'm sure if someone had a fear of black shoes they'd make that fear known and I'm sure people would make sure that is respected.
Don't really l know how it's a hard concept, but I guess some people aren't taught respect in the same way. It's okay though!
Well I'd say I'm sensitive to fat people, the sight of them offends me and I don't know anyone who's sensitive to clapping so based on my small sample it's more common to be sensitive to the sight of fat people.

Having a severe peanut allergy is quite a lot different seeing as some people can die from it, clapping is very unlikely to kill you
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idontevenbeth
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(Original post by HandmadeTurnip)
You still haven't answered my question from earlier.
I think I did? Could you clarify it? I've looked through and can't find it
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KarenTakeItEasy
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#74
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wtf is even happening in this thread rn :/
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idontevenbeth
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(Original post by Wade-)
Well I'd say I'm sensitive to fat people, the sight of them offends me and I don't know anyone who's sensitive to clapping so based on my small sample it's more common to be sensitive to the sight of fat people.

Having a severe peanut allergy is quite a lot different seeing as some people can die from it, clapping is very unlikely to kill you

It's not just about "Oh clapping can't KILL you so why can't they clap?". Some people (the speakers maybe) have small voices and may be experimenting with a different type of praise so that they can be praised without having to stop for loud clapping. Maybe it was held somewhere echoey, think acoustics! Or maybe someone in the audience has panic attacks easily? Or maybe one of the speakers is deaf and won't be able to hear the clappings of praise and agreement, and instead they'd appreciate a more visual type of praise. Endless situations!
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miscounted_time
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
So by your own reasoning it does have something to do with feminism. It may not be the reason they asked for refraining from clapping but it is still related even if it is a little tenuously to feminism.
If you mean extremely tenuous with almost no discernible link other than the use of the word feminist, then yes I agree it has something to do with feminism.


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Josb
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(Original post by idontevenbeth)
I used to have extreme phone anxiety, however by forcing myself to talk to people on the phone I'm much better. I still shake a little when talking and have to sometimes write out a script. However, if anyone forced me to talk on the phone without me mentally preparing I really think that would worry me. Some people aren't ready to recover, and that's okay! Maybe a lot of the people at the talk (or someone actually doing the talking) are sensitive, however it doesn't mean they shouldn't be included in everyday opportunities.

Interestingly enough, I was researching Oreo for my graphics project. I found out that in order for Oreo to be declared as Kosher, they had to spend something like £300,000 on each oven to be cleaned by a rabbi. Why would they spend so much if a) People who only eat kosher can just avoid oreos, and b) it costs so much and changes the recipe for everyone else? You can come to your own conclusions on that one, but it's just a thought.


I think if a speak says what it's about (eg. animal abuse, feminism, domestic violence. ect) then that should tell a person whether they can attend or not. Freedom of speech is a right, freedom of clapping isn't


:congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats::congrats:
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Wade-
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#78
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#78
(Original post by idontevenbeth)
It's not just about "Oh clapping can't KILL you so why can't they clap?". Some people (the speakers maybe) have small voices and may be experimenting with a different type of praise so that they can be praised without having to stop for loud clapping. Maybe it was held somewhere echoey, think acoustics! Or maybe someone in the audience has panic attacks easily? Or maybe one of the speakers is deaf and won't be able to hear the clappings of praise and agreement, and instead they'd appreciate a more visual type of praise. Endless situations!
But then if you're going to be that over the top you can make a case to ban a multitude of everyday things


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idontevenbeth
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#79
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(Original post by Wade-)
But then if you're going to be that over the top you can make a case to ban a multitude of everyday things


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Try and read what I put again
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TurboCretin
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(Original post by KingTiger)
Women are generally anxious when they move out of their natural habitat. The kitchen.
Laughed in spite of myself.
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