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    (Original post by lantan)
    NQT secondary speaking here..
    Yep, the workload is huge, yep it's stressful and yep, the money seems little for the workload. But!
    Seeing my other half do a nice City job and return home 3-4 hours (or even more!) later than I do does make me wonder that bigger money means bigger chunk of your life taken. Time wise...

    I honestly cannot say what's better. Sometimes I'm just really happy that I HAVE a job. Not everyone is so lucky.
    I think most well paid jobs (£30k+) come with stress. And if it doesn't then consider yourself incredibly lucky! I often see people working on paperwork on public transport on the way to/from work. But teachers take their work home with them, and don't seem to stop at all.
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    The money seems awful to me. It cannot justify not having a life. Part of the reason I don't want to carry on with it.

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    (Original post by Bloom77)
    What teacher are you
    Secondary or sixth form


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    Primary. KS2, to be specific.
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    is it true only English. maths and science teachers can progress up the management chain and become head of years etc?
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    No, any subject specialist can take on those roles.
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    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    Variety. Hilarity. Meaning. A sense of worth in what you do. Hilarity (again - seriously, kids are like living, breathing joke books).

    No one goes into it for the money. People who care about the size of their salary (beyond the necessary "can I afford to eat?" sort of concern) aren't the kind of people who go into teaching.

    The world needs all sorts. I would love to be a bit more financially stable, but I gave that up for a more meaningful job. Other people would be happier keeping criminals out of jail or trading commodities (whatever that means) for 5x what I earn. That's fine, but it's not for me.
    No need of stereotyping, Lynsey. There are many ways of finding meaning in what you do and different people choose different ways.
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    (Original post by lledrith)
    I have since left teaching personally, and have just finished an Access to HE diploma in Bio, Chem, and Physics. I'm starting a BSc in Medical Imaging this September. I loved teaching, and still do, but I wanted to do something different with my life that didn't involve lugging home hundreds of books to mark every weekend.

    It seems to me like you still aren't sure, and it certainly isn't for anyone on TSR to tell you whether or not teaching is for you - thankfully the work experience will help you with that. I just don't think you should jump head first into a career so quickly based on sparse information and opinions from a forum.
    So it's your second bachelors? What was your first one?
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    Get some experience and I think you will know.

    I didn't plan on becoming a teacher, I kind of fell into it (was unemployed briefly after university, an agency contacted me for a support role in a school after seeing my CV online. This led to cover supervisor work including long-term supply in my degree subject.) and found that I loved it.

    It is difficult, it is stressful, it can be really wearing (I know we get a lot of holidays but I am SO ready for this holiday) but it suits my personality and I can't imagine doing anything else. I'm a massive extrovert and am basically fuelled by interactions with other people, so it's the perfect job for me.

    The pupils definitely make it worthwhile - I teach some absolutely amazing kids, and it's also great when you win a small battle with a more challenging pupil. My bottom-set Y11 have gone from outright refusing to complete any assessments, to having all passed their qualificiation. It's only an FCSE (foundation certificate) not a GCSE but it's still a huge achievement for them.
    Sounds like you are in a good school. Would you ever teach in a challenging school?
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    So it's your second bachelors? What was your first one?
    Fine Art, followed by a PGCE in secondary, though I have also worked in primary schools. :yep:
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    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    Primary. KS2, to be specific.
    Do Primary teachers teach only one subject or more than one?.

    Do teachers have to take only 30 books to mark, including homework every day?

    How many times do you do training?

    What type of person would enjoy teaching?

    After how long does your salary could increase and how much? .
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Sounds like you are in a good school. Would you ever teach in a challenging school?
    Hmm... I teach in a very mixed school.

    For what little it's worth, it was Ofsted "Inadequate" a few years ago, but was most recently rated "Good".

    Our catchment area is very mixed and we have some very privileged pupils (who can also be challenging - and their parents certainly can!) and some very difficult, deprived and troubled children as well. And they can be fab too, it's just a lot harder to get out of them and you know they might well throw it back in your face the next day.

    For me it's important to have a balance. If you spend nearly all your time on crowd control and drowning in negativity from pupils who don't even want to do your subject, it saps your energy. That's what I was like last year, when literally only my Y7s were nice.

    This year I have two incredible top-set Y9 groups who are really pushing me to develop my teaching and extend them, so it's a challenge but in a different way. They're funny, creative, inquisitive and I love teaching them. Alongside that, I have some really low-confidence, low-ability and behaviourally challenging pupils in Y8, 10 and 11. But having a mixture of different challenges keeps me going and gives me a break from feeling like I'm banging my head against brick wall.

    So no, I don't think I'd want to work in a "challenging" inner-city school, but every school has its challenges.
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    (Original post by Uz25)
    Do Primary teachers teach only one subject or more than one?.

    Do teachers have to take only 30 books to mark, including homework every day?

    How many times do you do training?

    What type of person would enjoy teaching?

    After how long does your salary could increase and how much? .
    Look at my lengthy post on the first page of this thread. I already addressed your first couple of questions a few days ago.

    When you ask about training, do you mean ongoing training courses or the initial teacher training to become qualified?

    Your questions about salary have been addressed numerous times already in this thread.
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    TSR Support Team
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    There are ways to earn good money and teach, but you need to be prepared to work abroad long-term.
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    (Original post by Uz25)
    Do Primary teachers teach only one subject or more than one?.

    Do teachers have to take only 30 books to mark, including homework every day?

    How many times do you do training?

    What type of person would enjoy teaching?

    After how long does your salary could increase and how much? .
    Primary teachers teach the whole of the national curriculum, so every subject. You shouldn't go into primary teaching just because you have less books to mark. Yes, you have 30 books to mark, but thats 30 books per subject.

    You can't say 'only this type of person would enjoy teaching' because it doesn't happen like that. If you are interested in teaching then go and get some work experience in a school, people on a forum you have never met can't decide your future career for you.
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    (Original post by Uz25)
    Do Primary teachers teach only one subject or more than one?.

    Do teachers have to take only 30 books to mark, including homework every day?

    How many times do you do training?

    What type of person would enjoy teaching?

    After how long does your salary could increase and how much? .
    Supply teachers viewpoint. If I do a days Supply in Secondary I can leave shortly after the children. If I do a day's supply in Primary I mark during lunchtime and after school to complete marking by 6pm. There is a minimum of 60 books to mark, but can be as many as 120. When I was at Primary most pages got a big red tick. Now you need highlighter pens, at least two comments and, in some schools, to engage in Learning Conversations. Most work needs to be marked in depth. You can't leave spelling grammar and punctuation mistakes unremarked on in Literacy. You have to understand how pupils got wrong answer in Numeracy and get them back on track.

    Many Primary schools have setting for Numeracy and Literacy so you could see about 50 pupils per day. You would get to know all their names, but you would have to know exactly what their progress is in some detail.

    As a Supply I can leave at 6pm ( or rather, get thrown out by the caretaker locking up). During the day I am following highly detailed lesson plans prepared by someone else - about 12 - 15 pages of A4 typed in small font. There are several resources prepared on PowerPoint,as worksheets or as props.

    I estimate easily a 10 hour day for Primary if you're not very conscientious and doing bare minimum. Obviously, more work if you are committed which would be done at weekends and holiday time ( when you're not too ill).

    If you think Primary is easy work you're in for a huge shock.

    I used to be a secondary teacher and I would imagine workload now is similar even if the pressures of time are in different areas. Also, you would have to mark work delivered by Supply teacher.

    Remember, no-one goes into teaching for the money.....

    If you genuinely want an idea volunteer to go into infant schools to listen to children read...or get a job as a Teaching Assistant.
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    (Original post by Deirds)
    Supply teachers viewpoint. If I do a days Supply in Secondary I can leave shortly after the children. If I do a day's supply in Primary I mark during lunchtime and after school to complete marking by 6pm. There is a minimum of 60 books to mark, but can be as many as 120. When I was at Primary most pages got a big red tick. Now you need highlighter pens, at least two comments and, in some schools, to engage in Learning Conversations. Most work needs to be marked in depth. You can't leave spelling grammar and punctuation mistakes unremarked on in Literacy. You have to understand how pupils got wrong answer in Numeracy and get them back on track.

    Many Primary schools have setting for Numeracy and Literacy so you could see about 50 pupils per day. You would get to know all their names, but you would have to know exactly what their progress is in some detail.

    As a Supply I can leave at 6pm ( or rather, get thrown out by the caretaker locking up). During the day I am following highly detailed lesson plans prepared by someone else - about 12 - 15 pages of A4 typed in small font. There are several resources prepared on PowerPoint,as worksheets or as props.

    I estimate easily a 10 hour day for Primary if you're not very conscientious and doing bare minimum. Obviously, more work if you are committed which would be done at weekends and holiday time ( when you're not too ill).

    If you think Primary is easy work you're in for a huge shock.

    I used to be a secondary teacher and I would imagine workload now is similar even if the pressures of time are in different areas. Also, you would have to mark work delivered by Supply teacher.

    Remember, no-one goes into teaching for the money.....

    If you genuinely want an idea volunteer to go into infant schools to listen to children read...or get a job as a Teaching Assistant.
    Good advice. I'll get some work experience done. I'm into Science so I'm considering teaching science at secondary school. To be honest I'm confused so I'm just going to research
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    (Original post by Uz25)
    Good advice. I'll get some work experience done. I'm into Science so I'm considering teaching science at secondary school. To be honest I'm confused so I'm just going to research
    In that case, I recommend you get a job as a Science Technician in a secondary school first....

    Good luck, whatever you decide to do...
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    (Original post by Deirds)
    In that case, I recommend you get a job as a Science Technician in a secondary school first....

    Good luck, whatever you decide to do...
    Why? I mean how will getting a work experience as a Science technician help me? :/

    Honestly speaking, my aim is to do a degree which is specific, well paid and which i'd love to do! The courses that i'm considering are: Education, Pharmacy, Law. As you can see i'm clueless. I like helping people, advising them and doing power points. I do have this thing about "Crime is wrong", people might conduct Crime due to peer pressure etc. I'm into skin, why there isn't cure to skin condition etc.

    To be honest its very confusing. The most annoying part is when i found a work placement and my tutor wouldn't contact them

    By the way what are you doing at the moment? Course? Career?
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    (Original post by Uz25)
    Why? I mean how will getting a work experience as a Science technician help me? :/

    Honestly speaking, my aim is to do a degree which is specific, well paid and which i'd love to do! The courses that i'm considering are: Education, Pharmacy, Law. As you can see i'm clueless. I like helping people, advising them and doing power points. I do have this thing about "Crime is wrong", people might conduct Crime due to peer pressure etc. I'm into skin, why there isn't cure to skin condition etc.

    To be honest its very confusing. The most annoying part is when i found a work placement and my tutor wouldn't contact them

    By the way what are you doing at the moment? Course? Career?
    Hi I just wanted to say that being a science techinacian in a school is a really good place to give you an idea of whether you really want to teach or not. You'll get the science-y side but also a lot of organising, budgets, seeing teachers work etc.

    To be a science teacher you will need a degree in a science subject and then to do a Secondary PGCE so you can teach! Why not also ask to observe or help out with some science classes at a secondary school?
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    (Original post by Uz25)
    Why? I mean how will getting a work experience as a Science technician help me? :/

    Honestly speaking, my aim is to do a degree which is specific, well paid and which i'd love to do! The courses that i'm considering are: Education, Pharmacy, Law. As you can see i'm clueless. I like helping people, advising them and doing power points. I do have this thing about "Crime is wrong", people might conduct Crime due to peer pressure etc. I'm into skin, why there isn't cure to skin condition etc.

    To be honest its very confusing. The most annoying part is when i found a work placement and my tutor wouldn't contact them

    By the way what are you doing at the moment? Course? Career?
    I suggest you do a science degree and then decide if you want to be a teacher.

    I'm currently a supply teacher doing an Open University degree.

    I didn't realise you were still at school. Sorry. Generally, there are no guaranteed well paid jobs for specific degree courses. You need to decide if money or interest is your main motivation for study.
 
 
 
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