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Is 24k a decent starting salary? watch

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    (Original post by yabbayabba)
    Not everybody wants to do IB or consulting.
    i didnt mean that, i meant im looking at sectors which are the highest of all, and even then im not up myself to say 24k is meh for a uni graduate.
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    (Original post by welcometoib)
    lol at people saying 24k is ok. deluded site.
    24K outside of London is ok for a starting salary, key word being starting. You're hopelessly deluded if you think a corporation values a newbie, young kid just out of university with little experience at anything more than 30K unless they're bonkers mad. Once you're in the workplace and becoming skilled and earning new positions, then the pay should increase. The number of students who turn down jobs with those starting salaries because they're expecting to be high earning, high flying managers upon graduation astounds me.
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    (Original post by marco14196)
    24K outside of London is ok for a starting salary, key word being starting. You're hopelessly deluded if you think a corporation values a newbie, young kid just out of university with little experience at anything more than 30K unless they're bonkers mad. Once you're in the workplace and becoming skilled and earning new positions, then the pay should increase. The number of students who turn down jobs with those starting salaries because they're expecting to be high earning, high flying managers upon graduation astounds me.
    are you calling me deluded or generally most people? i have summer offers, most people dont. and im expecting at minimum 32ish k.

    when i said ok, i meant deluded site in that 24k is excellent for most peoples expectations, not bad.
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    Listen up kids. IT'S A STARTING SALARY. You should never expect the earth for a starting salary(unless you're one of those rare few IB types but then again they suffer with the time commitment of up to 100 hours a week so its not that great really). If you're in the 20-30K for the starting position, you're already better than 70% of the country. The main thing you should be looking to get out of that first job is a, the experience and b, references. If you do a good job and prove yourself to be an asset, you'll be rewarded dually for it.
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    (Original post by marco14196)
    Listen up kids. IT'S A STARTING SALARY. You should never expect the earth for a starting salary(unless you're one of those rare few IB types but then again they suffer with the time commitment of up to 100 hours a week so its not that great really). If you're in the 20-30K for the starting position, you're already better than 70% of the country. The main thing you should be looking to get out of that first job is a, the experience and b, references. If you do a good job and prove yourself to be an asset, you'll be rewarded dually for it.
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    (Original post by welcometoib)
    are you calling me deluded or generally most people? i have summer offers, most people dont. and im expecting at minimum 32ish k.

    when i said ok, i meant deluded site in that 24k is excellent for most peoples expectations, not bad.
    Not you specifically but just the majority. Most are lucky to even get onto a graduate scheme because the alternative(if you're a fool to turn one down) is to end up in a minimum wage job or join the hordes of unemployed graduates. My philosophy is take what you can get, even if it doesn't directly satisfy your expectations, because you gain the two things that will sustain you and your lifestyle. You get the critical experience you need to move into other jobs and you get references/connections. If I was expecting to make 30K from the start but was only offered 25K, I'd still take it because the market is highly uncertain and you may not get another opportunity. Once your on the ladder, its all about climbing it, even if you have to start off not where you wanted.
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    (Original post by RoundTrip)
    24k is a great starting wage especially if you live in the midlands or up north. I wouldn't live down South on 24k though unless I was confident it would increase substantially in a short amount of time.
    I live near London, in a city with one of the highest rents in the country and earn around that figure. Yet I have a very high amount of disposable income each month and live very comfortably.

    Would I be happy if I was still on this salary in 2 years? No, of course not, but for someone who graduated last year having only worked in retail i'm very happy with it. Anything above 20k is very good for your first job out of uni. A fair number of the people I graduated with are still working in shops or basic admin jobs for £7 an hour.
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    I think a big part of the problem is that those who get a great starting salary; boast about it. Those who don't; don't boast about it.

    So the only people who end up talking about their starting salaries are those who get good ones and it gives a very distorted view of what people can expect.
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    It's all relative. £24k is good, especially if you're living at home. People shouldn't be so quick to label those who expect more than that as deluded though.

    I personally would expect in the region of 40-45k, based on the profession that I'm entering.
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    (Original post by liarpoker)
    It's all relative. £24k is good, especially if you're living at home. People shouldn't be so quick to label those who expect more than that as deluded though.

    I personally would expect in the region of 40-45k, based on the profession that I'm entering.
    Jesus, what profession is that, gold hunting?
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    (Original post by liarpoker)
    It's all relative. £24k is good, especially if you're living at home. People shouldn't be so quick to label those who expect more than that as deluded though.

    I personally would expect in the region of 40-45k, based on the profession that I'm entering.
    What profession would that be and what is the employment market for it like. My advice is to temper your expectations with the starting salary. If a company offered you 30K instead of 45K but nobody else was responding to your applications, take the offer. The employment market is an all around mess. If an opportunity arises, snap at it because you may not get another. If you take the lower offer, it doesn't matter because you're on the ladder and you can start to make connections and get experience, allowing you to break from the graduate catch 22 thing with employers demanding "X" number of years of experience.
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    (Original post by yabbayabba)
    Jesus, what profession is that, gold hunting?
    apart formm finance, law pays that easily.
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    (Original post by liarpoker)
    It's all relative. £24k is good, especially if you're living at home. People shouldn't be so quick to label those who expect more than that as deluded though.

    I personally would expect in the region of 40-45k, based on the profession that I'm entering.
    Judging by your previous threads you're about to enter 3rd year?

    So you'll graduate in 2016? Which means in April 2017 you'll be able to come back and show us a photo of your P60 showing a 40-45k first year salary?

    I'd very much love to see that. Please don't forget
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    (Original post by Reue)
    I think a big part of the problem is that those who get a great starting salary; boast about it. Those who don't; don't boast about it.

    So the only people who end up talking about their starting salaries are those who get good ones and it gives a very distorted view of what people can expect.
    dont really think so, havent heard one person discuss their ib salary to me tbh.
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    (Original post by welcometoib)
    apart formm finance, law pays that easily.
    The employees are probably worked to death though; and not every law firm will pay that, just some. Not worth it, I want a work-life balance.
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    (Original post by welcometoib)
    dont really think so, havent heard one person discuss their ib salary to me tbh.
    Me neither. What I've seen a lot of is people's PREDICTED salaries. Yet no one so far has ever came back to show that they went on to earn as they predicted.
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    (Original post by yabbayabba)
    Jesus, what profession is that, gold hunting?
    (Original post by marco14196)
    What profession would that be and what is the employment market for it like. My advice is to temper your expectations with the starting salary. If a company offered you 30K instead of 45K but nobody else was responding to your applications, take the offer. The employment market is an all around mess. If an opportunity arises, snap at it because you may not get another. If you take the lower offer, it doesn't matter because you're on the ladder and you can start to make connections and get experience, allowing you to break from the graduate catch 22 thing with employers demanding "X" number of years of experience.
    Corporate law. I will most likely have a confirmed offer come September. I would still apply for the job (probably) if the starting salaries were starting from 35k, but since that's not the case, my expectations will be in line with the market trends. First year bankers can make £75-80k in their first year out of university. As you two have previously mentioned, these jobs don't make up the majority of the graduate market.

    At the City law firms, it ranges from around 35k to 50k straight out of university. After 2 years, you're looking at £60k -100k (depends on your firm). The figures can be misleading though, since you essentially have one non-money making year post uni, or two if you're converting from another degree. The hours can be brutal too, so it's not as lucrative as it may first seem,.
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    It's crazy just how out in front Investment Banking is in terms of salary, it really is.
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    (Original post by Oschene23)
    It's crazy just how out in front Investment Banking is in terms of salary, it really is.
    Its really not given how few get into it and how many people get left on the scrap heap. Add the extreme hours, boring work and high suicide rates in the financial world as well as worsening job security in the financial sector
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    (Original post by marco14196)
    Its really not given how few get into it and how many people get left on the scrap heap. Add the extreme hours, boring work and high suicide rates in the financial world as well as worsening job security in the financial sector
    I can assure you it's not boring. And suicide rates are over inflated massively by the media. And yes I'd consider 50k base salary and a possible 20%-80% bonus on top pretty amazing.
 
 
 
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