Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    It's a silly hairstyle anyway (no offence).
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reue)
    School is about maintaining standards
    Is it?

    I thought it was about educating kids. And no, that doesn't mean training them for the corporate workplace either.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I get the impression that her mother continued smoking long after the pack was empty.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    She's got the wrong school. That stupid school is definitely not good for her. She should be happy in the beauty school.

    https://d17b1stq82ojj.cloudfront.net...st-student.jpg

    http://www.campusexplorer.com/media/...n-21B49917.jpg

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by e aí rapaz)
    Is it?

    I thought it was about educating kids. And no, that doesn't mean training them for the corporate workplace either.
    Go read any school prospectus, they are about doing a lot more than just academic education.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    My human rights have been breached by looking at that stupid haircut. What a cruel and unusual way of torturing her fellow classmates.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    "Schools should focus more on education" is such a washed line.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I can see it from both points of view - the school and the girl and her mother. Ultimately though, I think I would side with the school. Its up to them to set whatever rules they see fit and if you choose to put your child in that school, they should have to stick to them. I do think some schools go a bit overboard with the dress code rules at times though. In my opinion, as long as a student wasn't wearing anything revealing, it would be fine.

    I can picture the girl dyeing over the leopard print and the school still not being happy because she still has what they would deem as an extreme haircut so what would she do then? Wear a wig? If she wore a wig to school now then maybe everyone would win. She would still have her hairdo and still look respectable enough in the eyes of the school.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    So the story continues. Her mum has now removed her daughter from the school claiming her human rights are being breached. She's also saying her daughter has a right to education. Now since her daughter has been removed and is not attending school isnt that an offence itself.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...rned-away.html
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    It's a very debatable issue this

    My opinion, and that's all it is, but my opinion is that any right the child has to an education, is not being breached by the events.

    The reason is simply that there is a school there, with a place for her, available and willing to take her.

    The only stipulation being that you co-operate with the rules of the school. And because they are not co-operating, she has been asked to rectify the rules she is breaking.

    I've not seen anyone saying the girl has been banned from school for x period of time, or been punished in any way. From what I've read, the school are simply taking the stance of 'sort the matter out'. I think it's actually kinder that she be asked to leave school to rectify the haircut than be punished (i.e. detentions). The school don't want to punish her, and if they did it'd be wrong because she can have her haircut as she likes. But the fine distinction here is that the doesn't meet the rules set by the school, they haven't set lines, they've put her on hold to fix it. Totally different message.

    The mother and child therefore have the education that they have a right to, available to them, at any moment they wish to have it. There are rules involved, and the rules they don't like, but ultimately an education is not being denied.

    Rights are not absolute. A right to free speech is very similar, you can't ban people from saying what they think, but at the same time, if you say certain things they can and frequently do have consequences.

    These sorts of rules are one of the many compromises we make in life to make a society we can live in. I've said it before, and I'll say it again, I think the mother is the barrier to the child getting an education here, and if people do feel the childs rights are being breached, the behaviour/attitude of the mother should (in my opinion) be the focus on the question as to why this is the case.

    I am not a teacher, and I don't run a school, but if I did, I too would be unhappy about the haircut, schools do pride themselves on image, and whether people like it or not, image is important in life. Learning to be an individual as part of society is as much of your education as your math. There I said it.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Would they have kicked her out if she was bald due to cancer or another illness? Bit silly tbh. Discriminating against people because of their hair.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    It's their school, they can set whatever dress code they like. If you don't want to abide by it then don't go to that school, simple

    I think the school's decision makes sense, personally. A school isn't there to just make kids get good exam results, but to educate them in pretty much all aspects of life, including how to function as part of a community and in the real world. The school can't set a precedent that would creates an environment in which such behaviour is culturally acceptable, because that's just not how it is in reality. Pupils who grow up believing it is perfectly normal and acceptable to modify their appearance in whatever strange and outlandish way they like will tend not to be the ones who are most successful in finding a respectable place for themselves in society.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I'm not really that surprised that this happened. It's hardly a conspicuous hairstyle and I don't really care that she got in trouble for it. Rules and rules and she should've known that the school wouldn't be happy with it. She did it in full knowledge of what would happen and, fairness and freedom of expression aside, she can't have expected to be an exception to those rules. That's not how things work. And if she didn't know there would be a problem with it, I seriously doubt the school will suffer from the loss of a student with such a lack of common sense.

    What rules really irritate me are the ones from schools who are even more pedantic. Like those that have rules concerning colours of jackets. I know someone who got stopped at the gate of their secondary school because their jacket, through frequent use, had faded from black to more of a dark grey. He got told he couldn't wear that. Now those kinds of rules are the ones more deserving of anger.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    Bit silly tbh. Discriminating against people because of their hair.
    Is it discrimination though? Individuality has a lot to do with discrimination - cancer takes a lot of choice out of the equation which means a judgement upon them is not made on individual merit, which does lead you down the path to the discrimination zone, if you please.

    Someone who knowingly shaved their head though whilst knowing the schoo rules, could not surely argue the same case?

    Before we say the school is discriminating on the basis of hair, we do need to make sure that is what is happening. Because not many people suffering from cancer have been removed from school, I suspect it's not, and schools are working intelligently, and applying the rules in a non-discriminatory way.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    This is not about a hairstyle. This is about teenage rebellion. She has only done this to shock and offend. If the school had not reacted, she would have done something more extreme (and possibly dangerous) to provoke them. This is extremely poor parenting on the mother's part. Dealing with a teenager aiming to shock should include strategies of forbidding/preventing the outrageous behaviour and ignoring it but never indulging it.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Englishkeymaster)
    Is it discrimination though? Individuality has a lot to do with discrimination - cancer takes a lot of choice out of the equation which means a judgement upon them is not made on individual merit, which does lead you down the path to the discrimination zone, if you please.

    Someone who knowingly shaved their head though whilst knowing the schoo rules, could not surely argue the same case?
    well ye she's been refused education on the basis of her hair lol. If it was piercings I'd agree with it more because it's a bit more serious (health hazard). But a hairstyle? I just think the response is way over the top.

    It's like "girls should have long hair. You can't study here unless you have long hair."


    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    This is not about a hairstyle. This is about teenage rebellion. She has only done this to shock and offend. If the school had not reacted, she would have done something more extreme (and possibly dangerous) to provoke them. This is extremely poor parenting on the mother's part. Dealing with a teenager aiming to shock should include strategies of forbidding/preventing the outrageous behaviour and ignoring it but never indulging it.
    eh not really. She probably just thought it looked cool lol. Which is what goes through most people's mind when deciding what to wear. Especially children.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Why complain when you contravene the school rules that you agreed to when you signed up, also to anyone who says 'its against her humans rights' etc; i firmly encourage you to get a grip!
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    well ye she's been refused education on the basis of her hair lol. If it was piercings I'd agree with it more because it's a bit more serious (health hazard). But a hairstyle? I just think the response is way over the top.

    It's like "girls should have long hair. You can't study here unless you have long hair."
    I'm not sure it's the cut that they have a problem with, but perhaps the dye. I could be wrong. However, overall the entire thing is garish and isn't something that would be received well at a job interview, so why should it be appropriate at school?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Is it really that hard to follow a dress code? If you're that bothered just get home-schooled.

    God, who do these people want to emulate? Skrillex?
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    well ye she's been refused education on the basis of her hair lol. If it was piercings I'd agree with it more because it's a bit more serious (health hazard). But a hairstyle? I just think the response is way over the top.

    It's like "girls should have long hair. You can't study here unless you have long hair."


    eh not really. She probably just thought it looked cool lol. Which is what goes through most people's mind when deciding what to wear. Especially children.
    No. Being "cool" is essentially conformist; not to school rules but to some arbiter of style whether that is a peer group or a celebrity or someone who has appointed themselves as an arbiter of style such as a designer or writer. I accept that being rebellious can itself be "cool" when rebellion is itself fashionable but that doesn't detract from the force of what I am saying.
 
 
 
Poll
How are you feeling in the run-up to Results Day 2018?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.