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    Not happy or sad that he's elected.

    Just really baffled that people think he's unelectable even though he took the labour leadership in a landslide majority in one round of votes.
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    Happy, he is most Eurosceptic of the candidates, wont vote for him but him winning might help the out campaign.

    What I am curious about is where the Labour votes everyone says Corbyn will win over are coming from? Labour could collect a large amount of the green votes but they are spread out and not that many, in Scotland SNP are a left party AND care only about Scotland why would you switch to Labour especially when a Labour SNP coalition would definitely happen (so voting SNP wont put Tories in Downing street), he may get some disillusioned voters back and may inspire people who haven't voted before but this really is an unknown quantity. So really not gaining many. However he will push all moderates out the party, may force people in the center to vote Tory as they are worried about his position. So i can't see him gaining many net votes if any and the Tories won a majority last time so that would result in the same again.

    Good to see a politician where you know what he stands for but he does look to be disastrous for the Labour party.
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    (Original post by jamiep151)
    Happy, he is most Eurosceptic of the candidates, wont vote for him but him winning might help the out campaign.

    What I am curious about is where the Labour votes everyone says Corbyn will win over are coming from? Labour could collect a large amount of the green votes but they are spread out and not that many, in Scotland SNP are a left party AND care only about Scotland why would you switch to Labour especially when a Labour SNP coalition would definitely happen (so voting SNP wont put Tories in Downing street), he may get some disillusioned voters back and may inspire people who haven't voted before but this really is an unknown quantity. So really not gaining many. However he will push all moderates out the party, may force people in the center to vote Tory as they are worried about his position. So i can't see him gaining many net votes if any and the Tories won a majority last time so that would result in the same again.

    Good to see a politician where you know what he stands for but he does look to be disastrous for the Labour party.
    the main thing about the election is bc of the fptp system its not about winning over a majority of the population, its about winning the swing seats just look at the last election
    also obviously a lot can change in 5 years, but some of corbyns policies are supported by the majority of the population (i think its around 70 or 80% believe in renationalisation) things like this will attract those swing voters
    also you have to consider what state the country will be in after another 5 years of tory rule
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    (Original post by citydeer)
    the main thing about the election is bc of the fptp system its not about winning over a majority of the population, its about winning the swing seats just look at the last election
    also obviously a lot can change in 5 years, but some of corbyns policies are supported by the majority of the population (i think its around 70 or 80% believe in renationalisation) things like this will attract those swing voters
    also you have to consider what state the country will be in after another 5 years of tory rule
    I am aware of this but to win the swing seats you need to improve your net vote (if you lost that seat last time like Labour did in enough to give Tories a majority) and for the reasons I stated I don't see him doing that resulting in the same result as last time.
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    (Original post by Akamega)
    No, I was actually referring to the millions of displaced refugees that Cameron seems so reluctant to take.
    Can you tell me how you would know they are refugees and not economic migrants, or terrorists?

    Oh and then there's the small matter that I DONT SEE WHY WE SHOULD BE PAYING FOR THEM AND LETTING THEM INCREASE OUR POPULATION FURTHER!
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    (Original post by rebeccarmi)
    What are your opinions on Jeremy Corbyn?

    As a conservative I'm happy he got elected
    Yeah same, majority conservative vote guaranteed. He is also anti-EU which is great since it puts pressure on Cameron to finally leave the EU.
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    I think it's fantastic. There's at least some hope for the UK now.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)

    Time to go put a few grand on a Tory landslide in 2020, might get a payout of a few pence.
    Tory majority in the next GE is evens or better....
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    (Original post by Gwilym101)
    Not happy or sad that he's elected.

    Just really baffled that people think he's unelectable even though he took the labour leadership in a landslide majority in one round of votes.
    Because a heavily political Labour party membership is about as representative of the electorate as those in the Tories who elected IDS.

    He got a landslide and good for him but preaching to the converted means little at a general election. Just look at Farage for somebody who's adored by a small group of people but couldn't even keep his EU election vote entirely.

    (Original post by BinaryJava)
    Yeah same, majority conservative vote guaranteed. He is also anti-EU which is great since it puts pressure on Cameron to finally leave the EU.
    He's not anti-EU, he's just anti current EU policy. He's like Syriza or Podemos in that they support EU membership but currently believe that its too neoliberal.

    At any rate, most people who want out want out because of immigration. He wants more of the third world here.
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    (Original post by joey11223)
    Tory majority in the next GE is evens or better....
    It was a joke...

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    Who thought electing an aging liberal hippie douche was a good idea when people are turning more and more to the right?
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    It was a joke...

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Your avatar suggests your a Tory so if you think a lurch to the left won't do Labour any favours, it might be a good time to get on.. Lucky for those who went with a Corbyn win he was over 100/1 to begin with.
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    There’s a leadership battle. The party is torn between left and right. A extremist candidate, considered by most to be unelectable, unexpectedly wins, creating an ideological rift. The knives come out, with fears the party will never win an election again. But the new leader sticks to their guns. They doggedly push through, and cause the biggest ideological shift in the party’s history. The leader then wins a landslide election victory and two more after that, serving for 11 years, as the leader I'm talking about is Margaret Thatcher. Corbyn can do the same.
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    As a Tory supporter i'm delighted. More chance of Farage getting elected PM than this loony lefty.
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    (Original post by alexschmalex)
    His name is on damn near every thread on TSR nowadays but I still have no clue who the hell he is :erm:
    Kids these days :no:
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    I'm just hapoy because he looks like a badass, he could be a real good mastermind villain in a movie.

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
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    The real problem with Western politics is the Jewish problem

    Cameron is as much as a Jew as Miliband in my eyes.

    Those goy Prime Ministers like Blair are surrounded by Jews who sell out British people to fight for wars for the Jews... this was the case even in WW2 after all with Churchill who was deep in the pockets of the Jews and could often be seen having meetings with them..


    American's were pushed into two world wars for the benefit of the Jews. The Jews were promised Palestine by the British in return to getting America into WW1 to defeat Germany.. this is why Hitler blamed Jewish finance for losing WW1.

    I'll leave you with this

    Name:  cameron-warcrimes.jpg
Views: 33
Size:  28.6 KB

    Jews need to be purged from politics, before it's too late!

    We need to get them out of the media too. Keep tabs on all our MP's and see who they receive funding from and what special interest groups they belong to...
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    (Original post by jjm456)
    There’s a leadership battle. The party is torn between left and right. A extremist candidate, considered by most to be unelectable, unexpectedly wins, creating an ideological rift. The knives come out, with fears the party will never win an election again. But the new leader sticks to their guns. They doggedly push through, and cause the biggest ideological shift in the party’s history. The leader then wins a landslide election victory and two more after that, serving for 11 years, as the leader I'm talking about is Margaret Thatcher. Corbyn can do the same.
    Ironic you use the analogy with Margaret Thatcher, when to my mind a comparison with Michael Foot seems more apt. Far, far left of centre leader of the Labour party, splits the party between the moderates and the 'Corbynites', leads labour into exile for years. A significant reason for Thatcher's success was the fact she pulled Britain's economy out of the rut it was in, and that no real opposition existed due to all the infighting. No serious economist could suggest that Corbyn's flagship policy of printing money to bring about re-nationalisation was anything other than lunacy, and it's labour who are a divided party.
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    (Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
    Ironic you use the analogy with Margaret Thatcher, when to my mind a comparison with Michael Foot seems more apt. Far, far left of centre leader of the Labour party, splits the party between the moderates and the 'Corbynites', leads labour into exile for years.
    I see where you're coming from, and I'm certainly not implying that an extremist candidate will always, or even usually, win, but the 1979 election proves it can be done. Callaghan was far closer to the centre ground than Thatcher, and still lost.

    (Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
    A significant reason for Thatcher's success was the fact she pulled Britain's economy out of the rut it was in, and that no real opposition existed due to all the infighting.
    Again, although obviously I would dispute Thatcher's economic 'success', this doesn't render the example of 1979 as void. She hadn't been in office yet, so she didn't have an economic record.

    (Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
    No serious economist could suggest that Corbyn's flagship policy of printing money to bring about re-nationalisation was anything other than lunacy,
    Once more, whilst you may disagree with Corbyn, as I would disagree with Thatcher, this doesn't address the point that policy which is perhaps seen as ridiculous at one time (eg Thatcher's monetarism) can be shifted closer to the centre ground with the right leader. Remember how London's loony left GLC under Livingstone were ridiculed for espousing bonkers policies such as gay marriage, cycle lanes, pollution free zones and affordable social housing? Well those policies are now all adopted by Cameron to an extent.

    I would also redirect you here:
    http://positivemoney.org/2015/03/pro...tative-easing/

    Also important to note nobel prize winners Paul Krugman and Joseph Stiglitz, support Corbyn's economic policies.

    (Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
    and it's labour who are a divided party.
    Exactly my point - just as the Tories were divided in 1975-79.
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    (Original post by jjm456)
    I see where you're coming from, and I'm certainly not implying that an extremist candidate will always, or even usually, win, but the 1979 election proves it can be done. Callaghan was far closer to the centre ground than Thatcher, and still lost.



    Again, although obviously I would dispute Thatcher's economic 'success', this doesn't render the example of 1979 as void. She hadn't been in office yet, so she didn't have an economic record.



    Once more, whilst you may disagree with Corbyn, as I would disagree with Thatcher, this doesn't address the point that policy which is perhaps seen as ridiculous at one time (eg Thatcher's monetarism) can be shifted closer to the centre ground with the right leader. Remember how London's loony left GLC under Livingstone were ridiculed for espousing bonkers policies such as gay marriage, cycle lanes, pollution free zones and affordable social housing? Well those policies are now all adopted by Cameron to an extent.

    I would also redirect you here:
    http://positivemoney.org/2015/03/pro...tative-easing/

    Also important to note nobel prize winners Paul Krugman and Joseph Stiglitz, support Corbyn's economic policies.



    Exactly my point - just as the Tories were divided in 1975-79.
    You make a fair point. To my mind, the difference is that in the late 70s the government's policies were clearly failing to get to grips with the economic downturn. Unemployment was rife, the unions had a stranglehold over pretty much everything and the traditional industries were in dire straits. Polarisation; when people are desperate, they turn to the political extremes. In my opinion it was this that gave Thatcher her chance to run for office. People were desperate enough to try something out of left field, so to speak.

    I'm not sure this applies today. The worst of the economic hardship is over; unemployment is falling, Britain's economy is growing and all the forecasts suggest we'll be operating at a surplus by 2020. Had Corbyn ran in the 2010 General Election then maybe people would have bitten, but now? I don't see people taking a punt on his radical economic policy when what the Tories have done - whether or not you agree with the means - has essentially worked.
 
 
 
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