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    (Original post by drowzee)
    It still doesn't make sense though. If people are referring to afternoon tea with the cakes and scones then I can understand, but most people do not drink tea with their dinner. I know it's a commonly used word, so it's not going to change. I just don't see the logic behind it.
    I don't know anybody who drinks tea with anything other than breakfast.
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    (Original post by ellen998)
    It's just a snack or pastry or something at 11 o'clock
    Ah ok, thanks
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    (Original post by TwinnyP)
    I don't know anybody who drinks tea with anything other than breakfast.
    Afternoon tea foods? Biscuits?
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    Guys can we throw supper into the mix as well?
    My South African family call it supper, was shocked to find out that supper where I'm from its like hot chocolate and a biscuit after tea/dinner
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    Afternoon tea foods? Biscuits?
    I mean with a set meal. People obviously drink it alone, or with biscuits.
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    The trusty Guardian wrote some guidelines on this...

    Scroll down a bit first.
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    (Original post by scriberg)
    Breakfast, Lunch, Cheeky Nandos
    top bants
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    I say breakfast, lunch and dinner, generally up north they tend to use breakfast dinner and tea more commonly.

    Breakfast, dinner and tea was what used to be traditional - at middayish you'd eat your main meal, followed by afternoon tea in the PM / evening. This was more common in the North for much longer than in the South, especially in rural areas, hence the more common usage of those words. If you want to be pedantic, really it should be Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, as hardly anyone actually eats a full meal for their lunch anymore, it tends to be in the evening.
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    obviously tea, anyone who says otherwise is southern or a middle to upper-class nob
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    (Original post by conroy26)
    obviously tea, anyone who says otherwise is southern or a middle to upper-class nob
    Too bad: I'm neither.
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    (Original post by ellen998)
    where I live everyone calls it tea
    yorkshire?
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    I call it dinner, my friend calls it tea
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    (Original post by drowzee)
    It still doesn't make sense though. If people are referring to afternoon tea with the cakes and scones then I can understand, but most people do not drink tea with their dinner. I know it's a commonly used word, so it's not going to change. I just don't see the logic behind it.
    Actually, it does make some sense for an evening meal to be called 'tea' among the working classes. The upper classes in history traditionally had an afternoon tea at about 3pm to keep them going until their evening meal, which was not until about 8pm. In contrast, factory workers finished their manual labour jobs earlier in the evening and came home famished at about 6pm. . Hence, this was when the lower classes (the majority of the population) ate their main meal, called 'high tea' ('high' probably because it was eaten at the table as opposed to afternoon tea, which was eaten on a sofa, for example). High tea usually consisted of cups of tea, bread, veg, cheese and sometimes meat. Afternoon tea was more of a snack, with cakes served alongside cups of tea.

    So, if you are middle or upper class, then it might not make sense for someone to call an evening meal 'tea', but its use is legitimate and has historical backing among the lower classes. Don't hate us cause you ain't us, m'lady. *tips hat*
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    (Original post by kkboyk)
    Too bad: I'm neither.
    kewl
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    (Original post by abc:))
    Breakfast, dinner and tea was what used to be traditional - at middayish you'd eat your main meal, followed by afternoon tea in the PM / evening. This was more common in the North for much longer than in the South, especially in rural areas, hence the more common usage of those words. If you want to be pedantic, really it should be Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, as hardly anyone actually eats a full meal for their lunch anymore, it tends to be in the evening.
    That supposes that people in the North use dinner as reference to one's main meal and not simply because of the time it's eaten. The sense of main meal has been entirely lost in the North and it's taken on another entirely new distinct sense. Language evolves, so it's perhaps a little dubious to say If you want to be pedantic in this situation.

    Incompetently, the comprehensive OED doesn't even list this "new" sense. Need sacking.
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    it is dinner
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    (throws spanner in works) Supper
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    Breakfast, lunch, tea.
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    (Original post by callum_law)
    That supposes that people in the North use dinner as reference to one's main meal and not simply because of the time it's eaten. The sense of main meal has been entirely lost in the North and it's taken on another entirely new distinct sense. Language evolves, so it's perhaps a little dubious to say If you want to be pedantic in this situation.

    Incompetently, the comprehensive OED doesn't even list this "new" sense. Need sacking.
    Yeah, point taken, I guess I should have said something more like 'if you want to use the terms for their original meanings' but you're right, language evolves
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    (Original post by conroy26)
    kewl
    Don't be jelous.My non-existent swag on TSR is too much to handle.
 
 
 
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