Londoners - how has diversity enriched your life? Watch

glo420
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#61
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#61
More open to people, more types of cuisines, understanding one's culture.
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stressedfordays
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#62
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
You can get any type of food you like. It is one of the few places I can get hold of decent biltong.
i can relate,:ahee::ahee::ahee:
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asif007
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#63
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#63
I lived in London for 21 years before my parents moved abroad, but I'm now based in Leeds. And I have to say that despite both cities being multicultural and diverse to varying degrees, London is a city that is enriched by so many different communities living together. By that I mean that different ethnic groups are so well-integrated with each other that they are able to serve their own communities with the space and facilities that London has to offer. The Bengali community in Tower Hamlets is spread around Brick Lane, Indians/Pakistanis have developed the businesses in Green Street, Southall, Harrow etc, Turkish people in Haringey and Islington etc. In particular, South Asian communities in London ensure that there are religious/cultural events happening nearly every day of the week - festivals like Diwali, Vaisakhi, Eid, Holi etc. The communities are large enough in London for one to expect that we love our culture and are proud of hosting these kinds of events.

On the other hand, the South Asian communities in Leeds are proportionally large enough to match those of London, Birmingham, Manchester or Bradford, but nothing ever happens here to help me feel proud of my culture. Despite a huge Indian population (both students and locals), the Indian cultural events in Leeds only happen up to 3 times a year. Pakistani cultural shows only happen once a year and, if Eid falls during the academic year then there might be a small party but nowhere on the same scale as what happens in London. There's a sizeable Sikh Punjabi community in Leeds too, but not a single event to cater for those with a taste in Punjabi music (the last Bhangra party in Leeds was a one-off back in 2012). The lack of community integration and cultural events reflects in people's attitudes here because everything is about alcohol and I can't go anywhere without my "friends" convincing me to try alcohol despite the fact that they know I'm Muslim and I refuse to go near the stuff. Coming from a Pakistani Punjabi background and living in a city where non-alcohol events absolutely do not exist, is very alienating for me. That just doesn't happen in London because people are open-minded and culturally aware enough to know that I'm interested in different things to them. As a result I miss London every day, not just because it's my home but because my friends from other ethnic backgrounds actually respect me enough to include me in their community events happening throughout the year. The fact is, the lack of integration in Leeds is because people prioritise alcohol before everything else and refuse to give it up. I feel so helpless as a Muslim man living in Leeds because the communities are so well-hidden here, and therefore the city has nothing to offer me if there's actually nothing to get involved in.

Worst part is that I can buy South Asian food and cooking ingredients for much cheaper in London than I can in Leeds.
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Saint-Saens
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#64
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#64
(Original post by Bill_Gates)
It has made it one of the greatest cities in the world. Take away the diversity and it will drop FAR down the list. See for yourself the greatest cities have the greatest diversity.

If we fail to attract the best talent we fall behind. Basic economics 101.
What complete rubbish. London was always great when it was completely white. Now, it is not so nice (not saying race is directly responsible)
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Saint-Saens
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#65
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(Original post by jape)
It doesn't actually enrich anyone's lives. There's no examples anyone saying it does can give that hold up to daylight, especially not when you're resorting (as redferry did) to food on three occasions, then to the impending threat of death, then food again, and the UKIP/Tories.

I live (for the next few days) in a very multicultural/ethnic area in London. It's a nuisance, not because there are lots of people of different ethnicities, but because people go about in their own tribes, there's rampant racism from all communities, people speak a million different languages and when I try to speak to someone their English (if its fluent enough to be coherent) is so thickly accented that it is difficult to understand. How anyone can support that is beyond me. It is an impediment to a successful society.
Thank you for saving me writing exactly this
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Bill_Gates
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#66
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(Original post by Saint-Saens)
What complete rubbish. London was always great when it was completely white. Now, it is not so nice (not saying race is directly responsible)
London has only been put on the map since it has been mixed. UK's over anyway. London's dropped to like 5th and 13th for earnings.

Peasants.
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Saint-Saens
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#67
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#67
(Original post by Bill_Gates)
London has only been put on the map since it has been mixed. UK's over anyway. London's dropped to like 5th and 13th for earnings.

Peasants.
****ing hell, you have been brainwashed by the Guardian
It has been one of the most important cities on earth since the 1600s, if not earlier.

And it isn't over, other countries are just improving which is a good thing
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Truths
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#68
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I feel like it has given my a much better understanding of the world. Especially compared to the likes of your average American who has absolutely no idea about anything outside of their country.
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Betelgeuse-
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#69
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I saw this years Notting Hill carnival had "Knife Bins". Knife Bins are good therefore +1 for cultural enrichment
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jape
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(Original post by Betelgeuse-)
I saw this years Notting Hill carnival had "Knife Bins". Knife Bins are good therefore +1 for cultural enrichment
Isn't "knife bin" just a Notting Hill euphemism for...
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Demilb
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#71
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(Original post by Betelgeuse-)
I saw this years Notting Hill carnival had "Knife Bins". Knife Bins are good therefore +1 for cultural enrichment
This is such a silly comment to make. Yeah there were knife bins, but what has that got to do with anything? It's a huge cultural event with up to 2 million people attending. Considering that,the amount of knife crime that happens during the 2 days is extremely low. You also haven't mentioned the amount of money it brings into London's economy. It's not all just knife bins and crime, and you should at least acknowledge that.


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MagicJigsaw
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#72
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Everyone seems to be pointing to cuisine - while that's true to an extent, I don't really think it's an effect of multiculturalism in general. I mean, nobody really eats Nigerian takeaways or buys food from a Polish shop/sklep etc except for people of said race. The only cuisine we really eat are Indian, Chinese, Turkish (kebab) and some others, but they've become so entrenched in our culture that I don't really view them as 'multicultural' anyway if you know what I mean - like chicken tikka is our national dish, Chinese food is very westernised, kebabs are served in chip shops and so on. You can get these three cuisines in predominantly non-multicultural (mostly rural) areas.
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redferry
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#73
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(Original post by Swindle)



Yeah, the majority of the 10 people fatally stabbed in London this year have been black. And the perpetrators don't care who gets caught in the crossfire - man, woman or child. They have no incentive to avoid harming innocent people.

I'd argue that Italians have integrated better because of the shared European background.

.
At least where I live it generally happens in pretty secluded places, and only a handful of times a year. It's not something I'd ever worry about, you dhave to be very unlucky to get caught up in it. At the end of the day theyre just stupid kids.

That shows you know nothing about the history of Italian immigration. Italian culture is one of the most distant European cultures from Britain. The community was very very insular - with Italian communities moving to the same areas and frequenting the same restaurants and cafes. There was a lot of xenophobia, people really didn't like us, my grandad said on a par with the Sikh community, although in some ways even that garnered more respect because of coming from a British colony (we came over at the same time).

That's why I think it's mad when people complain about immigrants today, 'they don't have respect for women' - neither did most Italians, 'they don't mix' - neither did we, 'they have a totally different culture' - so did we, 'they are unskilled' - so were we, most Italians were economic migrants, dirt poor (my grandad came over on a donkey with nothing) who came to work in the mines, and a lot of them ended up setting up cafes, restaurants and ice cream parlours. I'd definitely say we enriched British culture, and have become a part of Welsh history. There was even a programme on BBC last week called the Welsh Italians about us. We were no different to the people coming over now - other than we were less in need.
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redferry
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#74
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#74
(Original post by MagicJigsaw)
Everyone seems to be pointing to cuisine - while that's true to an extent, I don't really think it's an effect of multiculturalism in general. I mean, nobody really eats Nigerian takeaways or buys food from a Polish shop/sklep etc except for people of said race. The only cuisine we really eat are Indian, Chinese, Turkish (kebab) and some others, but they've become so entrenched in our culture that I don't realy view them as 'multicultural' anyway if you know what I mean - like chicken tikka is our national dish, Chinese food is very westernised, kebabs are served in chip shops and so on. You can get these three cuisines in predominantly non-multicultural (mostly rural) areas.
Speak for yourself.

We have the best polish takeaway and shop near us.

I've not eaten much Nigerian food but Ethiopian is where its at!
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redferry
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#75
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(Original post by asif007)
I lived in London for 21 years before my parents moved abroad, but I'm now based in Leeds. And I have to say that despite both cities being multicultural and diverse to varying degrees, London is a city that is enriched by so many different communities living together. By that I mean that different ethnic groups are so well-integrated with each other that they are able to serve their own communities with the space and facilities that London has to offer. The Bengali community in Tower Hamlets is spread around Brick Lane, Indians/Pakistanis have developed the businesses in Green Street, Southall, Harrow etc, Turkish people in Haringey and Islington etc. In particular, South Asian communities in London ensure that there are religious/cultural events happening nearly every day of the week - festivals like Diwali, Vaisakhi, Eid, Holi etc. The communities are large enough in London for one to expect that we love our culture and are proud of hosting these kinds of events.

On the other hand, the South Asian communities in Leeds are proportionally large enough to match those of London, Birmingham, Manchester or Bradford, but nothing ever happens here to help me feel proud of my culture. Despite a huge Indian population (both students and locals), the Indian cultural events in Leeds only happen up to 3 times a year. Pakistani cultural shows only happen once a year and, if Eid falls during the academic year then there might be a small party but nowhere on the same scale as what happens in London. There's a sizeable Sikh Punjabi community in Leeds too, but not a single event to cater for those with a taste in Punjabi music (the last Bhangra party in Leeds was a one-off back in 2012). The lack of community integration and cultural events reflects in people's attitudes here because everything is about alcohol and I can't go anywhere without my "friends" convincing me to try alcohol despite the fact that they know I'm Muslim and I refuse to go near the stuff. Coming from a Pakistani Punjabi background and living in a city where non-alcohol events absolutely do not exist, is very alienating for me. That just doesn't happen in London because people are open-minded and culturally aware enough to know that I'm interested in different things to them. As a result I miss London every day, not just because it's my home but because my friends from other ethnic backgrounds actually respect me enough to include me in their community events happening throughout the year. The fact is, the lack of integration in Leeds is because people prioritise alcohol before everything else and refuse to give it up. I feel so helpless as a Muslim man living in Leeds because the communities are so well-hidden here, and therefore the city has nothing to offer me if there's actually nothing to get involved in.

Worst part is that I can buy South Asian food and cooking ingredients for much cheaper in London than I can in Leeds.

I used to live in Leeds and in all honest I think that's a problem with being part of the student community rather than the community of Leeds itself. I used to live right by the gudwara and there was events happening all the time (I know, not Muslim, but I'm sure the same still applies. Like, I imagine it's similar at the uni of Birmingham and there's a massively integrated Muslim community in Birmingham (I grew up there), or UCL or Imperial or any of the other London unis.

The culture will always seem different from within the student bubble compared to where you are from. It's a shame because it meant a lot of my friends back home got so wrapped up in things like Islamic society that they no longer have any non Muslim friends, and a few don't speak to me any more.

Also really?!?! I used to get south Asian food dirt cheap in Leeds, from maccas opposite the mosque (10 quid for a weeks food for 2 people!) and the place just down from the gudwara. I can hardly get it in London, but then where I live the predominant immigrant communities are Turkish, afro-carribean and polish.
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barnetlad
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#76
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I have a doctor nearby. On the couple of occasions that I have gone to hospital I have been treated much more quickly because a doctor or nurse born abroad has been working there. There is a bus service where a cancelled journey is a rarity, unlike about 15 years ago.
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Loose_Seal
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#77
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I live in Ipswich so it's the other way around, I'm Indonesian btw. Sometimes I feel a little bit intimidated by people here but I'm sure I'll get used to it after all that is why I came here, to be more open with diversity . Haven't gotten a chance to properly see London but I can see many non-England people there, hmm interesting points OP.
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angelcake123
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#78
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SAMOSAS

thank you Asians

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TheCitizenAct
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#79
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(Original post by jape)
It doesn't actually enrich anyone's lives. There's no examples anyone saying it does can give that hold up to daylight, especially not when you're resorting (as redferry did) to food on three occasions, then to the impending threat of death, then food again, and the UKIP/Tories.

I live (for the next few days) in a very multicultural/ethnic area in London. It's a nuisance, not because there are lots of people of different ethnicities, but because people go about in their own tribes, there's rampant racism from all communities, people speak a million different languages and when I try to speak to someone their English (if its fluent enough to be coherent) is so thickly accented that it is difficult to understand. How anyone can support that is beyond me. It is an impediment to a successful society.
The ironic thing about multiculturalism is that it actually spawned the polar opposite outcome - cultural homogeneity. They describe boroughs like Tower Hamlets as 'diverse', however they are anything but. They are increasingly orientated around one culture.
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AyCaramba
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#80
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Quick 2nd gen african viewpoint here, I think once it gets to middle class people of different cultures actually spread better and contribute more, we have other west african friends here but also white and asian, the learning of other cultures happens mostly in schools
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