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vegan, vegetarian, omnivore? watch

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  • View Poll Results: are you vegan, vegetarian, omni, other?
    vegan
    27
    17.31%
    vegetarian
    38
    24.36%
    omni
    85
    54.49%
    other
    6
    3.85%

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    (Original post by LinnyPinny77)
    Hey,

    Yes some are incomplete for instance peas being paired with say rice or a wholegrain becomes a 'complete' protein. So in this instance you are correct! I've found it loads easier to put on muscle and bulk up since quitting the meat almost 10 years ago. My blood tests recently showed perfect healthy range for B12 and Iron and I don't take supplements for either of these.

    I don't tell people how to live their life but I believe it's best to know all about food before judging or making sweeping statements like 'vegans are abnormal' or 'vegans are deficient in protein' because it's simply not true. Also doctors advocate for everyone to eat more vegetables and fruits...not eat tons more meat. I mostly think the presence of antibiotics, hormones and toxins which are present in all of these due to injection/medicine for farmed animals or from pollution in the sea are definitely not good for the human body.
    That's just to say that their is an upper limit where meat is not healthy - synonymous with saying there is a healthy range too. For example, the ratio between veg and fruit is skewed towards veg due to sugar in some fruits.

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    (Original post by 0range)
    Are you actually kidding me? "an 18% increase doesn't amount to much" Mate that is almost 1/5th of an increase. That is a ****ing lot.
    “What we do know is that avoiding red meat in the diet is not a protective strategy against cancer,” said Robert Pickard, a member of the*Meat Advisory Panel*and emeritus professor of neurobiology at Cardiff University.

    Dr Elizabeth Lund – an independent consultant in nutritional and gastrointestinal health, and a former research leader at the Institute of Food Research, who acknowledges she did some work for the meat industry in 2010 – said red meat was linked to about three extra cases of bowel cancer per 100,000 adults in developed countries.

    “A much bigger risk factor is obesity and lack of exercise,” she said. “Overall, I feel that eating meat once a day combined with plenty of fruit, vegetables and cereal fibre, plus exercise and weight control, will allow for a low risk of colorectal cancer and a more balanced diet.”



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    I eat meat, and I won't consider cutting it out of my diet until I feel confident I'm not going to relapse into an eating disorder. Saying that, I do often eat meals that don't contain meat (seeing as I'm equally a poor student, and I like to make sure the meat I buy is good quality, free range, etc) and I eat little to no "processed meat" - I just don't like most of it. I know quite a few people who are vegetarian, including my mother, and a couple of vegans, one of whom is of the militant type and another who just cut out meat and dairy for medical reasons (and jokes that she's the least preachy vegan ever!)
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    (Original post by 0range)
    Are you actually kidding me? "an 18% increase doesn't amount to much" Mate that is almost 1/5th of an increase. That is a ****ing lot.
    It depends what your cancer risk is. If you are healthy and your risk is small, that small risk increasing by 18% isn't that much
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    (Original post by rock_climber86)
    *some humans are omnivores - not all
    Humans are almost exclusively omnivorous.

    It could be argued that someone lacking the capacity to process animal tissue is a herbivore. However someone that chooses not to do so is a vegetarian.

    Regarding the term 'carnivore' - the media use it to refer to people that eat meat - in error. Humans are certainly not obligate carnivores and it is almost certain that we are not facultative carnivores either.
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    (Original post by 0range)
    Are you actually kidding me? "an 18% increase doesn't amount to much" Mate that is almost 1/5th of an increase. That is a ****ing lot.
    (Original post by RFowler)
    "Eventual cancer" are the words you used, and that implies a very high to near certain cancer risk. Which is simply not the case.

    Some processed meats allegedly increase cancer risk by about 18% when consumed excessively. Most people have a low risk of cancer to start with, and an 18% increase doesn't amount to much.

    And OP didn't specifically mention processed meats, or how much he/she eats, so the concerns about processed meats might not even be relevant at all.
    The reality is that eating processed and red meats increase the risk of bowel cancer in particular, basically the recent evidence about this that came out said if red meat and processed meat was eliminated 100% then there would be 8,800 fewer cases of bowel cancer in the UK.

    http://www.theguardian.com/science/s...th-of-evidence

    Name:  cancer research meat.png
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    Personally I think that the environmental and animal welfare motivations for becoming vegetarian or vegan are much more powerful. Watch Cowspiracy everyone!
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    (Original post by rockrunride)
    Humans are almost exclusively omnivorous.

    It could be argued that someone lacking the capacity to process animal tissue is a herbivore. However someone that chooses not to do so is a vegetarian.

    Regarding the term 'carnivore' - the media use it to refer to people that eat meat - in error. Humans are certainly not obligate carnivores and it is almost certain that we are not facultative carnivores either.
    only on TSR :facepalm:

    Ok biologically and historically we are omnivorous, but by no means are we all omnivorous by choice. I am a Vegan because I believe we can live perfectly healthy lives without meat, and also because I don't agree that animals should be killed for food.
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    (Original post by greggyt94)

    Personally I think that the environmental and animal welfare motivations for becoming vegetarian or vegan are much more powerful. Watch Cowspiracy everyone!
    Yup could not agree more, these two are the main reasons I'm a vegan
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    (Original post by rock_climber86)
    only on TSR :facepalm:

    Ok biologically and historically we are omnivorous, but by no means are we all omnivorous by choice. I am a Vegan because I believe we can live perfectly healthy lives without meat, and also because I don't agree that animals should be killed for food.
    You are a vegan (which I think is a remarkable and admirable lifestyle choice) but still omnivorous as a member of a species that 'normally derives its energy and nutrients from a diet consisting of a variety of food sources that may include plants, animals, algae, fungi and bacteria.'

    I associate the terms carnivore, herbivore and omnivore with biological capability rather than conscious choice.
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    I know of a vegan who turned pescaterian (only because of health reasons) and in my year there are at least 7 vegetarians that I know of
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    Read a few philosopher papers that I find it really hard to disagree with. Trying vegetarian atm
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    Omnivore... because meat is lyf. Know a couple vegetarians, no vegans.
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    Largely vegan, but I do eat mussels and honey as I don't believe they carry the environmental issues a lot of vegetables have or the ethical issues of eating other animal products.

    Some people get annoyed when I tell them this as it's not truly vegan. But I think it is more short sighted to instantly discount certain foods just because you think you fall into a particular category without even considering any of the implications. I don't judge others for what they eat (honestly, I know some vegans can be pretty scathing though) and don't like it when omnivores/strict-vegans judge loose-vegans/vegetarians for what they eat.

    All I do know is it is virtually impossible to eat animal products and consider yourself and environmentalist, apologies if this is you, but you are kidding yourself!!
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    omnivore all the way nom nom nom
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    (Original post by greggyt94)
    Personally I think that the environmental and animal welfare motivations for becoming vegetarian or vegan are much more powerful. Watch Cowspiracy everyone!
    Yes! This. I've always been concious of eating environmentally and high welfare, but Cowspiracy literally changed my life. Even if you are not interested in going veggie/vegan (which is fair enough it is completely your choice) I think you should watch it, it is really REALLY interesting. Yeah some of the facts are a little dubious, but it is fascinating to see how industry and charitable groups react to the impacts of animal agriculture NO-ONE wants to talk about it. If I can give you one piece of advice for 2015 it is watch this film!
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    (Original post by 0range)
    Lol good luck with that eventual cancer.
    It's possible to eat meat without consuming an excessive amount of red/processed meat, you know?
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    Omnivore. But reducing red meat intake due to enviromental issues
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    (Original post by LinnyPinny77)
    Not sure if you're aware but legumes (beans, lentils...), nuts, soy, veggies, and wholegrains all contain protein and most of these contain more protein per gram than meat. Vegans certainly do not lack protein, this is an absolute misconception. I don't preach and I don't like preachy people on either side of the debate (omnivore or vegan) but i believe people should understand food and where key nutrients come from.

    Ah, but what type of protein and how good is your body at breaking it down, and what about fibre content etc. It isn't as simple as most people make out.

    (Original post by 0range)
    Who says a vegan lifestyle means you lack protein? I most certainly get enough protein.



    ...I'm not even going to bother
    Through what exactly and how much do you have a day?
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    (Original post by Jimbo1234)


    Through what exactly and how much do you have a day?
    Well two scoops of soy (I lift) + peanut butter, Also a mixture of different beans and lentils which usually comes to 60g, and I snack on different nuts as well.
    Which is by far more than I prob need.
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    (Original post by greggyt94)
    I think that the environmental and animal welfare motivations for becoming vegetarian or vegan are much more powerful. Watch Cowspiracy everyone!
    I watched it and it was a load of horse****.

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