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    (Original post by jeremy1988)
    Then your argument also works for cultural property.
    I don't see how: there is no such thing. Cultures do not work to do anything; they just happen. And they certainly don't invest in anything. Or won anything. They are nebulous.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    People can always be criticised for doing things. Whether that criticism is reasonable, sensible or justified is a different matter (and subjective). Those that claim someone is doing something dickish, as in the case of those that criticise so-called cultural appropriation, run the risk of looking dickish themselves (as, indeed, they are). Are you going to answer my questions?
    Read 'legitimately' in the part of my post you quoted.

    I may answer your questions later when I am not at work.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    I don't see how: there is no such thing. Cultures do not work to do anything; they just happen. And they certainly don't invest in anything. Or won anything. They are nebulous.
    That's exactly the problem with this entire concept. People are treating a culture as if it's a corporation. They're acting like Black people or Chinese people, for instance, are a collective entity that can be ripped off by a perpetrator that's also a collective entity like White people or Arab people. It may not be very logical, but that's the perspective being taken.

    But these categories are very, very porous. Suppose we wanted to argue about whether I as an American can be held liable for appropriating British culture. We could ask five different people and get five different answers.
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    If you are a part of a culture, then you have a right to determine what can or cannot offend you with regards to that culture... Although you cannot then say that you have a right to determine what another person of another culture can or cannot be offended by, unless you're simply educating say a British person on why generic cultures may take offence to their traditions not being taken seriously. Why do you assume that I'm British because I said calling traditional clothing 'costumes' is wrong? It would be ridiculous of me to try have an argument/opinion of something I don't understand.


    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    And if my employer in Mexico has decided to use the term that he believes could please other Mexican employees and children, who are you, a random British person who never even have met a Mexican person, to feel offended by it?

    As a Chinese person, I'd also speak for my culture and ask that white people refrain from feeling offended for me.
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    (Original post by Avila.C)
    calling traditional clothing 'costumes' is wrong.
    You are having a laugh, surely?

    It is time for you to let me educate you. It is offensive (and patronising) to "educate" other people on what language they may use - especially when you are trying to appropriate some synonyms to mean something you wish them to mean for political purposes.

    Costume, schmutter, gear, clobber, clothes, dress, apparel, garb, ensemble, attire, panoply - it's all perfectly acceptable.
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    (Original post by Avila.C)
    If you are a part of a culture, then you have a right to determine what can or cannot offend you with regards to that culture... Although you cannot then say that you have a right to determine what another person of another culture can or cannot be offended by, unless you're simply educating say a British person on why generic cultures may take offence to their traditions not being taken seriously. Why do you assume that I'm British because I said calling traditional clothing 'costumes' is wrong? It would be ridiculous of me to try have an argument/opinion of something I don't understand.
    Who decides whether you're a part of that culture, though? And what happens if other people in your culture disagree on what is offensive with regards to that culture? For instance, what if someone tells someone who identifies with their culture that they're not really a member of it, and then proceeds to accuse them of appropriation as a way of ostracising them? I've certainly seen things like this done with people of the same ethnicity born in different locations, or people of mixed race who are viewed as less than full members of their culture, etc.

    I mean, in theory, there's nothing wrong with the concept... but the problem is that cultural membership is somewhat poorly defined, and there doesn't seem to be a consensus among people belonging to the same culture as to what is or is not offensive with regards to other people using symbols of their culture.
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    (Original post by Avila.C)
    If you are a part of a culture, then you have a right to determine what can or cannot offend you with regards to that culture...
    That's my point - modern-day Chinese culture has nothing to do with ancient Chinese culture. The same goes to most cultures. So what you're saying is that the fact that I'm born ethnically Chinese is the only qualification - you are being racist.

    (Original post by Avila.C)
    Although you cannot then say that you have a right to determine what another person of another culture can or cannot be offended by, unless you're simply educating say a British person on why generic cultures may take offence to their traditions not being taken seriously. Why do you assume that I'm British because I said calling traditional clothing 'costumes' is wrong? It would be ridiculous of me to try have an argument/opinion of something I don't understand.
    So what are you trying to say? Are you a Mexican living in Mexico? Why are you criticising me? Or are you just being hypocritical?

    And are you saying my employer in Mexico as well as all the Mexican staff and children are all wrong about whether wearing a Mexican costume is offensive (while you're the only correct one)?
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    And are you saying my employer in Mexico as well as all the Mexican staff and children are all wrong about whether wearing a Mexican costume is offensive (while you're the only correct one)?
    That's the problem with being someone who educates people about what others feel (or should feel) offended about: you are generally speaking on behalf of people you haven't consulted, who have their own views on the matter (which usually are far less precious) and who don't care what you think.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    That's the problem with being someone who educates people about what others feel (or should feel) offended about: you are generally speaking on behalf of people you haven't consulted, who have their own views on the matter (which usually are far less precious) and who don't care what you think.
    But the biggest SMH moment was when that poster said:

    '...you cannot...say...what...another culture can or cannot be offended by...It would be ridiculous of me to try have an argument/opinion of something I don't understand...'

    Double standard much?
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    You are having a laugh, surely?

    It is time for you to let me educate you. It is offensive (and patronising) to "educate" other people on what language they may use - especially when you are trying to appropriate some synonyms to mean something you wish them to mean for political purposes.

    Costume, schmutter, gear, clobber, clothes, dress, apparel, garb, ensemble, attire, panoply - it's all perfectly acceptable.
    Also, it appears that Spanish, the main language in México, has the same word that can mean both 'costume' and 'attire'. This suggests that Mexicans are highly unlikely to be offended by 'costume' but not 'attire' when they are the same word.

    That poster is just failing on so many levels.
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    That poster is just failing on so many levels.
    There is no logic, sense or consistency in the argument, so that is not surprising.
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    (Original post by jeremy1988)
    If other cultures are allowed to profit from using the creations of your culture (as happened during Imperialism with things like tea from China), without having invested time or money in that creation, then what incentive is there to create a unique cultural identity rather than just stealing someone else's?"
    OT but just want to point out that drinking tea in Britain did not start with imperialism from the British Empire. It was more Chinese imperialism exporting its culture to other countries (plot twist: Chinese people encourage cultural appropriation). Tea was introduced to England by the Portuguese princess who married Charles II.
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    (Original post by earthworm)
    Non christians who celebrate xmas... Cultual apropriation?
    Christianity isn't a culture, although people may be offended by non Christians celebrating Christmas.
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    (Original post by jensenbudz611)
    Christianity isn't a culture, although people may be offended by non Christians celebrating Christmas.
    So hinduism isnt a culture and i can wear a bindi guilt free?
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    (Original post by saeed97)
    Wtf is this stupid ass thread?
    It's a thread about cultural appropriation.
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    (Original post by FridaKahlo)
    It's a thread about cultural appropriation.
    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by saeed97)
    Alrighty.
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    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...opriation.html

    University's free yoga class is shut down over 'cultural appropriation' fears after complaints from 'social justice warriors'
 
 
 
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