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What do you think about the new law where police can view our internet history? watch

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    (Original post by Betelgeuse-)
    Its the unforeseeable price the average person pays dearly for the wholly selfish, myopic and irresponsible unlimited and unabated mass immigration of third world people and cultures to this country that of which the average person paying for now has opposed and opposed

    Its absolutely disgusting
    Do you not ever wonder if your anger is getting directed away from the actual problems? That and the problems are aloud to get worse as a result?
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    Do you not ever wonder if your anger is getting directed away from the actual problems? That and the problems are aloud to get worse as a result?
    What anger and actual problems are you referring to?

    Im not sure what you mean?
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    every time you go shopping you are "monitored" by cameras instore.
    if you have a loyalty card, "they" know what you eat, maybe even your time of the month, could tell if you suddenly stop eating meat etc.


    why do you think tailored pop ups appear after you've been looking shoes online, then suddenly a motorcycle forum page suggests shoes?

    Just to stress - we are NOT all monitored - we CAN be. Nobody is looking at your history, the changes ensure that if you come up on the radar in 6 months time, they can flag you up, and go back to see what you've been looking at.
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    (Original post by domonict)
    every time you go shopping you are "monitored" by cameras instore.
    if you have a loyalty card, "they" know what you eat, maybe even your time of the month, could tell if you suddenly stop eating meat etc.


    why do you think tailored pop ups appear after you've been looking shoes online, then suddenly a motorcycle forum page suggests shoes?

    Just to stress - we are NOT all monitored - we CAN be. Nobody is looking at your history, the changes ensure that if you come up on the radar in 6 months time, they can flag you up, and go back to see what you've been looking at.
    There's quite a difference between some company data mining your shopping habits to build profiles and target you with vouchers and a systematic attempt to store a history of everything you read online, which includes your hobbies, poltical views, blogs, social media, everything. :eek4:
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    (Original post by domonict)
    every time you go shopping you are "monitored" by cameras instore.
    if you have a loyalty card, "they" know what you eat, maybe even your time of the month, could tell if you suddenly stop eating meat etc.


    why do you think tailored pop ups appear after you've been looking shoes online, then suddenly a motorcycle forum page suggests shoes?

    Just to stress - we are NOT all monitored - we CAN be. Nobody is looking at your history, the changes ensure that if you come up on the radar in 6 months time, they can flag you up, and go back to see what you've been looking at.
    What a ridiculous comparison, when you're at a store you are aware you are being monitored.. most people use Internet in the private of their own home.. its a joke how you can compare the two. I could go on and on but have already doned your dance.

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    (Original post by Betelgeuse-)
    What anger and actual problems are you referring to?

    Im not sure what you mean?
    You seem to be blaming the decline in living standards and quality of life western in European countries on mass immigration whilst ignoring factors such as a financial crisis resulting in the 'austerity' narrative that is allowing the government to take money of working people.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    You seem to be blaming the decline in living standards and quality of life western in European countries on mass immigration whilst ignoring factors such as a financial crisis resulting in the 'austerity' narrative that is allowing the government to take money of working people.
    erm no, i am saying that this intrusive and disgusting bill would not have come about without the problems forced on us all by mass immigration of Islamists
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    (Original post by Betelgeuse-)
    erm no, i am saying that this intrusive and disgusting bill would not have come about without the problems forced on us all by mass immigration of Islamists
    Because Terrorism didn't exist before 9/11 right?
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    (Original post by mojojojo101)
    Because Terrorism didn't exist before 9/11 right?
    In the UK? Not with the scale and frequency. Not even close lmao
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    (Original post by Betelgeuse-)
    In the UK? Not with the scale and frequency. Not even close lmao
    Never heard of the IRA then?
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    (Original post by mojojojo101)
    Never heard of the IRA then?
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    (Original post by Star Light)
    This law doesn't allow them to see your precise browsing history, just some information about the kind of internet usage that may contribute to warrants being given for actually looking at people's data.

    Also, it's not like anyone is ever going to use this power on you unless you are involved in shady dealings or somehow associated with something the police are investigating. How could they be checking 'EVERYONE'? There are tens of millions of internet users in this country, and not tens of millions of online government privacy-invading agents. If they put filters through people's internet data for illegal sites, e.g. viewing child pornography, buying illegal substances, then people who aren't breaking the law are fine.

    Honestly, what is wrong with this law? It allows the dangerous minority to be caught to preserve the safety of the law-abiding majority.

    It also has great potential for missing person cases - if a 13 y/o disappears, and you find out that they were talking on Facebook right before they vanished, you could then get a warrant to see their messages and see if that was anything to do with it.
    I agree.
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    (Original post by Betelgeuse-)
    Not even CLOSE
    So your saying that Islamic terrorism and the, basically one major incident it resulted in, has been significantly worse than the IRA's war against the British in N. Ireland and multiple bombings and shootings across England over a period of decades...


    #soundslegit
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    (Original post by mojojojo101)
    So your saying that Islamic terrorism and the, basically one major incident it resulted in, has been significantly worse than the IRA's war against the British in N. Ireland and multiple bombings and shootings across England over a period of decades...


    #soundslegit
    Once incident? That the brutal beheading of Lee Rigby or the 52 innocent commuters blown up on londons transport networks?

    Let me give you a clue as to why there has only been a handful of terrorist incidents domestically in the UK... Further and further restrictions on peoples liberty and more powers to intelligence services at the expense of every single person. They are thwarting attacks by the month
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    We are all ****ed if this passes. What's stopping them enacting even stronger polices after this. Orwell's ****ing nightmare. Might as well move to china or north korea with the level of government oversight this new bill will bring.
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    It will be abused. The judges won't spend enough time considering requests; incidental findings could be used to nail suspects for unrelated offences like piracy; some ISPs will store the data inadequately and people's internet browsing habits will be exposed to criminals; minor safeguards in the bill will fail because few can be bothered to read all of it, and data will leak; many criminals will circumvent it via vpns and such, and the government will start pleading to the public for more strict powers when they realise organised crime has migrated to inaccessible platforms. I think probably the most worrying prospect though, is if future governments (which could easily be more authoritarian than the conservatives) may extend the powers of the bill when the draft bill already has as many intrusive powers as possible without being utterly unjustifiable.
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    (Original post by Unkempt_One)
    It will be abused. The judges won't spend enough time considering requests; incidental findings could be used to nail suspects for unrelated offences like piracy; some ISPs will store the data inadequately and people's internet browsing habits will be exposed to criminals; minor safeguards in the bill will fail because few can be bothered to read all of it, and data will leak; many criminals will circumvent it via vpns and such, and the government will start pleading to the public for more strict powers when they realise organised crime has migrated to inaccessible platforms. I think probably the most worrying prospect though, is if future governments (which could easily be more authoritarian than the conservatives) may extend the powers of the bill when the draft bill already has as many intrusive powers as possible without being utterly unjustifiable.
    You pretty much summed up my concernd, will rep you tomorrow.

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    Someone said that "if you come up on the radar in 6 months time, they can flag you up, and go back to see what you've been looking at" - If you become a suspect in 6 months time then that is the point at which monitoring should start because that's the point at which you have grounds to do it. In the 6 months prior to you becoming a suspect there were no grounds for anyone to be storing what you were looking at, so it is wrong for them to have that power, regardless of if it prevents a crime. It just isn't right, we needs checks and balances and grounds to go around storing this data.

    The harsh truth is this: If you don't want the authorities to be able to look at what you are doing, you must take steps to actively block them from doing so. For the past while I've been using the TOR browser exclusively. Even if i wanted to give anyone access to my history it would be impossible as there are no logs of it on my computer, and my ISP can only ever see me connecting to the TOR network, not where I go from that point on.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    They are not going to monitor everyone, but they can monitor everyone they want. That's the difference.

    What guarantee do you have that one employee working with this engine (that even Hitler or Stalin would have never even dreamt of) will never use it for his personal use, such as spying on his neighbour, on his ex's new boyfriend, or simply on the cell phone of random schoolgirls?
    Things like the ones you mention have already been recorded in the US in relation to the massive NSA personal profile data trawling operations. We also know from past admissions that US security services have passed along information they gathered in Europe to US corporate interests where it was commercially to their advantage. There is no reason to think that spooks wouldn't continue to do that if they or their friends or relations can make serious money out of it.

    The whole thing is wildly open to abuse and where things are open to abuse, history shows that they will be abused.
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    (Original post by Betelgeuse-)
    Not even CLOSE
    British deaths caused by IRA circa 1750
    British deaths caused by Islamic terrorism <100
 
 
 
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