Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

How much better is life for "rich" kids? watch

    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hihihihihi)
    Are we talking rich kids of instagram rich or just well off?


    Posted from TSR Mobile

    In general
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sw651)
    Posted from TSR Mobile

    In general
    Then yes it's better, my family has been both poor and well offish atm and the later is much better.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hihihihihi)
    Then yes it's better, my family has been both poor and well offish atm and the later is much better.
    see, my girlfriend comes from a slightly different type of background and she has far more material things than my family, even though my family are vastly better off so idk
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by _icecream)
    When they cut corp tax for their rich friends then that's Tory Britain for you
    Ah yes, making our market economy one of the most appealing in the world due to our low corp tax rate, and thus ensuring millions enter the job market.

    The evil bas*****!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by queen-bee)
    Already have an offer from Edinburgh. I wanted to stay in London and study at king's again or UCL this time but I wasn't able to attend my latter interviews because of illness
    AH right congrats on the offer. Are you going to accept it?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    Well if you lived in a "rough area" particularly I struggle to understand how you can call yourself a "rich kid"

    I too have worked since I was 15 although intermittently, the other luxury being able to pick and choose. Most poor kids have to contribute to the household, poverty is cash flow most of the time.

    "Kid" was a verb there...
    It's possible in many areas, especially London, to live close to rough areas but in a nice street or similar. That was the situation where I grew up in Oxford - the family home is large, with grounds around it, in a road with similar houses down one side, but smaller houses on the other side of the road and a large council estate across the road at the bottom, starting about 500 metres away. So it's very mixed. If you say the road to people in Oxford, they go "ohhh, posh" but it's really very close to some of the poorer people in the city. The state schools in the area are pretty socially mixed.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    A rich child does not always live a better live. This should be obvious.

    The child may have strict parents, attend boarding school, have health problems themselves, or have family problems at home.

    I would say from experience with others that a rich child whose parents divorce is substantially more likely to turn to drugs and make the wrong choices.

    I suppose if you put a poor family and a rich family side by side in comparison with each other, they may still have problems, but their materialistic wealth of the rich family does a good job at trying to convince you their lives are 'perfect'.

    Facebook is an example.

    The rest is just speculation and subjectivity.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Same as poor people in terms of overall happiness.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    AH right congrats on the offer. Are you going to accept it?
    I had to defer the year. So will be starting in September
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by queen-bee)
    I had to defer the year. So will be starting in September
    Edinburgh is a very nice city, lots of beautiful architecture for selfie photos if you're into that, but otherwise, if I were you, I'd choose London if you can afford to live there.

    There's so much to do in London, and there's more job opportunities down South.

    I suppose if you like quieter places, Edinburgh may be better than London, but then again, you can sit in Hyde Park, or Green Park and think you're in the middle of nowhere.

    I'd always wanted to study at King's College London too.

    It's a difficult decision, and one which will shape the rest of your life, so I would think very carefully about it if I were you. Maybe you could visit both cities before making any definite decisions?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jewb)
    Edinburgh is a very nice city, lots of beautiful architecture for selfie photos if you're into that, but otherwise, if I were you, I'd choose London if you can afford to live there.

    There's so much to do in London, and there's more job opportunities down South.

    I suppose if you like quieter places, Edinburgh may be better than London, but then again, you can sit in Hyde Park, or Green Park and think you're in the middle of nowhere.

    I'd always wanted to study at King's College London too.

    It's a difficult decision, and one which will shape the rest of your life, so I would think very carefully about it if I were you. Maybe you could visit both cities before making any definite decisions?
    I've lived in south Ken my whole life almost,I was born and raised in London although my parents weren't from the UK but moved here later on. I studied Biomed at king's. Very lovely place and if I had the option of studying there again I would choose it over having to move to Scotland
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    What even is a 'rich person?'

    People are inconsistent at the definition of a rich person, but my teacher told us that if an individual is worth, say, £200,000, then they consider someone of twice the value, ie £400,000 to be rich. You can extrapolate this pattern, but it goes to show that we all seek more money even if we already lots, so the struggles of life is much the same for richer families.

    That was argument 1, but don't forget the 'rich' kids are likely to have much busier parents, with stressful jobs like bankers or high flying accountants, so they won't get to see their parents so much. Therefore, in some ways, the rich kids have got it worse.

    Additionally, owning to their parents success, rich kids are more likely to be pressured into getting a good job and steered by their parents when they're not ready to take the wheel.

    So let's not consider this as an 'us and them' type world.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by queen-bee)
    I've lived in south Ken my whole life almost,I was born and raised in London although my parents weren't from the UK but moved here later on. I studied Biomed at king's. Very lovely place and if I had the option of studying there again I would choose it over having to move to Scotland
    I haven't read all of your posts, but by the sounds of it, King's haven't accepted you, or you're waiting for them to accept you?

    Is this a second B.Sc or a M.Sc?

    If you really want to study in London, have you applied to other Universities? I know King's is one of the best, but there's others you could consider?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jewb)
    I haven't read all of your posts, but by the sounds of it, King's haven't accepted you, or you're waiting for them to accept you?

    Is this a second B.Sc or a M.Sc?

    If you really want to study in London, have you applied to other Universities? I know King's is one of the best, but there's others you could consider?
    I applied an received an interview which I couldn't attend due to health reasons
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by queen-bee)
    I applied an received an interview which I couldn't attend due to health reasons
    Have you told them this?

    I'm sure they'll invite you for a second interview!
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    It's possible in many areas, especially London, to live close to rough areas but in a nice street or similar. That was the situation where I grew up in Oxford - the family home is large, with grounds around it, in a road with similar houses down one side, but smaller houses on the other side of the road and a large council estate across the road at the bottom, starting about 500 metres away. So it's very mixed. If you say the road to people in Oxford, they go "ohhh, posh" but it's really very close to some of the poorer people in the city. The state schools in the area are pretty socially mixed.
    An excellent point, which is not only the case in prestigious cities. Rich areas (although not that rich!) sat next to poor in Southampton, where I was at uni. I often marvelled at it in fact, that one culture could end and another begin at the road sign.

    I love social mixing of this sort and deplore ghettoisation and cleansing. Even though little actual "mixing" will go on you still have very different people relying on the same local government, corner shop, church, roads, parks and so on.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    An excellent point, which is not only the case in prestigious cities. Rich areas (although not that rich!) sat next to poor in Southampton, where I was at uni. I often marvelled at it in fact, that one culture could end and another begin at the road sign.

    I love social mixing of this sort and deplore ghettoisation and cleansing. Even though little actual "mixing" will go on you still have very different people relying on the same local government, corner shop, church, roads, parks and so on.
    It's awful social engineering. The riff-raff should keep to themselves.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 41b)
    It's awful social engineering. The riff-raff should keep to themselves.
    If it meant I didn't have to see people like you...
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    It's possible in many areas, especially London, to live close to rough areas but in a nice street or similar. That was the situation where I grew up in Oxford - the family home is large, with grounds around it, in a road with similar houses down one side, but smaller houses on the other side of the road and a large council estate across the road at the bottom, starting about 500 metres away. So it's very mixed. If you say the road to people in Oxford, they go "ohhh, posh" but it's really very close to some of the poorer people in the city. The state schools in the area are pretty socially mixed.
    You get this where I live. (Cheshire in North West, south of Manchester)

    One downside is that you are constantly made aware of how "poor" you are. And I come from a lower middle class family! Dunno how the people on the council estates feel or don;t feel.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I don't think rich kids are any happier,(as if happiness is a contest...) it just costs more to make them happy.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: November 12, 2015
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?
Useful resources
AtCTs

Ask the Community Team

Got a question about the site content or our moderation? Ask here.

Welcome Lounge

Welcome Lounge

We're a friendly bunch. Post here if you're new to TSR.

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.