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What's a fair price for uni tuition fees? watch

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  • View Poll Results: What's a fair price for uni tuition fees?
    No fees at all
    536
    23.86%
    Less than £3,000 a year
    426
    18.97%
    £3,000 a year
    727
    32.37%
    £6,000 a year
    323
    14.38%
    £9,000 a year
    136
    6.06%
    More than £9,000 a year
    98
    4.36%

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    (Original post by Katty3)
    Those are probably modules. It is very unfair to dismiss all poor kids (who are the most unlikely to go to university anyway) from doing what you consider "unworthy" degrees.

    These could include early years education public health.

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    these are not modules/these are whole degrees
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    (Original post by Katty3)
    Those are probably modules. It is very unfair to dismiss all poor kids (who are the most unlikely to go to university anyway) from doing what you consider "unworthy" degrees.

    These could include early years education public health.

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    Honestly, people doing degrees that don't help with jobs and being poor while their at it, is just bad decision making. I mean there are many respectable schemes such as some apprenticeships far better suited to help them out of the lower class and into the middle class. lol I don't know if this is related that much to your post, just wanted to say it and see what other people's perspectives are.
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    (Original post by TeeEm)
    these are not modules/these are whole degrees
    Even so. My point still stands. We need farmers. That includes managing dairy herds.

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    (Original post by Katty3)
    Top 10 by what measurement?

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    Some sort of board created for this specific thing. Obv some unis are tied and maybe they can be added but it's very easy to distinct largely which ones are better UoB,UoM vs Birmingham city and so on.

    Also depends on the degree like engineering, some not so amazing schools are really good picks while for Medicine they may not be as great. You should hopefully get my point here.
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    (Original post by TeeEm)
    these are not modules/these are whole degrees
    I can find no evidence of this. The closest I can find in the UK is a foundation degree in agriculture with dairy herd management.

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    (Original post by Katty3)
    Even so. My point still stands. We need farmers. That includes managing dairy herds.

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    But the do you think it's really worth the 18k or whatever it is these days to learn that? I am sure an apprenticeship is far better suited to breed a new farmer than a degree which is usually far more theoretical and less hands on.
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    (Original post by RiskVsReward)
    Some sort of board created for this specific thing. Obv some unis are tied and maybe they can be added but it's very easy to distinct largely which ones are better UoB,UoM vs Birmingham city and so on.

    Also depends on the degree like engineering, some not so amazing schools are really good picks while for Medicine they may not be as great. You should hopefully get my point here.
    Who is to say what the top ten is? A degree in teaching from Leeds Trinity will stand you in good stead.

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    (Original post by Katty3)
    Who is to say what the top ten is? A degree in teaching from Leeds Trinity will stand you in good stead.

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    People with knowledge in the areas. You really think a degree Leeds Trinity has the same reputation power as one from Oxbrige or other juggernauts?
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Are there any countries that have a "no fees" policy? Would you extend your idea to free accommodation and non repayable living allowances as well?
    Germany does! I can't claim to be an expert, but it appears to work for them
    Their students don't get "free" accommodation as far as I know (unless they're from disadvatantaged backgrounds etc), but I believe they can get student maintenence loans like we can. I looked in to studying in Germany a bit, and they reckoned you needed 800 or so euros per months to cover living costs, aka about £560, which I believe is quite a bit let than student costs over here haha!!
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    (Original post by rhiannonm25)
    No fees in Scotland is the best thing, I don't think id be able to afford going to uni if it wasn't free.. Neither would some of my friends. I think we are incredibly lucky
    And the funny thing is that because of the lack of tuition fees there is a massive lack of social mobility in Scotland. What do fees mean? They mean that the universities have more to give out in bursaries, especially when that is one of the conditions tied to charging.
    (Original post by Katty3)
    What about people who can't afford to pay for it because they come from working class families.Posted from TSR Mobile
    You do know what SFE is there for, right?
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    (Original post by RiskVsReward)
    People with knowledge in the areas. You really think a degree Leeds Trinity has the same reputation power as one from Oxbrige or other juggernauts?
    Oxbridge don't do primary teaching. Leeds Trinity has an amazing reputation for their institute of childhood and education. They have an in depth knowledge of the education system and childhood that Oxbridge don't because they don't specialise in it.

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    (Original post by Katty3)
    Oxbridge don't do primary teaching. Leeds Trinity has an amazing reputation for their institute of childhood and education. They have an in depth knowledge of the education system and childhood that Oxbridge don't because they don't specialise in it.

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    Funny that, because the universities themselves seem to think differently

    http://www.education.ox.ac.uk/
    https://www.educ.cam.ac.uk/courses/pgce/epgp/
    http://www.education.ox.ac.uk/courses/pgce/
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    There should be no limit, but the option of full loans for all which also cover living expenses.
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    (Original post by The Rad Prince)
    There should be no limit, but the option of full loans for all which also cover living expenses.
    As of next year it will pretty much be the case anyway, the problem with it is that the repayment system will need changing a fair bit, either lower threshold, higher payment rate, longer payback period, higher interest or a combination of the 4.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    As of next year it will pretty much be the case anyway, the problem with it is that the repayment system will need changing a fair bit, either lower threshold, higher payment rate, longer payback period, higher interest or a combination of the 4.
    The money has to come from somewhere and going to university is like placing a bet. You are betting that the cost of your tuition will be less than the extra earnings accumulated over your lifetime, so it makes no sense to expect the tax player to pick up the liability.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Funny that, because the universities themselves seem to think differently

    http://www.education.ox.ac.uk/
    https://www.educ.cam.ac.uk/courses/pgce/epgp/
    http://www.education.ox.ac.uk/courses/pgce/
    PGCE not undergraduate degree. Also secondary not primary. I highly doubt many schools are snobbish about who they will allow to teach.

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    9k is fine. We get the most reasonable loan ever, which is more like a tax. It decreases and increases according to your income. I don't know why anyone is complaining?
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    (Original post by The Rad Prince)
    The money has to come from somewhere and going to university is like placing a bet. You are betting that the cost of your tuition will be less than the extra earnings accumulated over your lifetime, so it makes no sense to expect the tax player to pick up the liability.
    Having done some rough calculations a bit back, the rates seem roughly set to at least break even in the long run
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    (Original post by Kugelmugel)
    Germany does! I can't claim to be an expert, but it appears to work for them
    Their students don't get "free" accommodation as far as I know (unless they're from disadvatantaged backgrounds etc), but I believe they can get student maintenence loans like we can. I looked in to studying in Germany a bit, and they reckoned you needed 800 or so euros per months to cover living costs, aka about £560, which I believe is quite a bit let than student costs over here haha!!
    I think most of the German states provide free university education, but not all - it's not a universally applied Federal system.

    I think France, Sweden, Denmark and a few other countries provide free or close to free university education. The problem is that in all these countries the role of the state generally is much larger than the UK's and their tax regime reflects that. So I guess it comes down to your personal position politically.

    Also worth noting that Germany has 2.4 million (2.97/100) students whereas the UK has 2.6 million (4.05/100) so the UK has 36.36% more in real terms.

    Therefore, if the UK want's to provide free university education it should start by being prepared to shrink its university behemoth by 36.36% (to be on par with Germany) and be prepared to raise taxes.
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    (Original post by Howard)
    I think most of the German states provide free university education, but not all - it's not a universally applied Federal system.

    I think France, Sweden, Denmark and a few other countries provide free or close to free university education. The problem is that in all these countries the role of the state generally is much larger than the UK's and their tax regime reflects that. So I guess it comes down to your personal position politically.

    Also worth noting that Germany has 2.4 million (2.97/100) students whereas the UK has 2.6 million (4.05/100) so the UK has 36.36% more in real terms.

    Therefore, if the UK want's to provide free university education it should start by being prepared to shrink its university behemoth by 36.36% (to be on par with Germany) and be prepared to raise taxes.
    Germany also doesn't let anybody who wants to go to uni to keep unemployment stats down.

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