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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    I think that the Universities should make accommodations subject specific, as all the students doing real subjects would be constantly busy, creating a nice and calm learning (and living) environment. And all the sports science students etc. could trash their accommodation and do whatever they want without annoying anyone else. Obviously there are exceptions, but certain types of people usually are attracted to the certain types of subjects.
    I see your point, but you do meet a range of people

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    (Original post by tecwhizz)
    As the title suggests I'm not really into clubbing, in fact I'm teetotal. I know Newcastle has something of a reputation and whilst the university itself may deny it, no doubt it would attract the kind of students who do like clubbing, purely because of it's reputation. I'm not a fuddy-duddy and I'll happily be with people who do drink, but I just don't like clubbing, so alternative nightlife would be great! You know; quieter pubs, social things etc.

    I suppose my question is really 'Is there enough going on for someone like me, and enough people who perhaps aren't as keen on going clubbing that I could socialise with in the evenings.' The thought of being in a larger city appeals to me, but not if I've got no friends! I'm looking at York as a competitor and obviously the campus environment makes it a little bit tamer, but I thought I'd at least try to extract some information from other sources before coming to a decision on this aspect of the unis.

    Sorry for the long post!

    TL;DR: Is there enough to do and enough people to socialise with if I don't like clubbing and don't drink?
    There are 24,000 students at Newcastle, do you really think that all of them love clubbing?
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    I think mate go be honist you are going to find most people like clubbing no matter where you go . Just because you don't drink dose not mean you can't go clubbing I found it to be a. Vital bonding experience . I had somone in my group of frends that didn't t drink and he partied as hard if not harder then us .

    In uni you will find there are lodes of other things to do besides clubbing there are sociatys or clubs for almost anything you can think of of the top of my head you could try.

    Football
    American football
    Hockey
    Ice Hockey
    Quiddich (yes it's a real thing)
    Games society
    Fetish society
    Rugby
    Climbing
    Film
    Writing
    Riding
    Travel
    Isco
    Christinan Union

    That's just a small selection of what's on offer if I werecyoubibwoukd go to the clubs and sociatys fair it's like the freshens fare but for sociatys you may even find a teetotal society. So I would say join one of them.
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    (Original post by tecwhizz)

    I've got the Tea Society earmarked because I'm so unashamedly British so I'm sure there'll be some people to meet there too!
    Hang on there is a Tea society how did I not know about this when I was In uni i can't get enlighten of tea
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    I go to Dundee uni and the union there is horrendous when it comes to drinking. I'm teetotal myself now and all that DUSA does it promote drinking; after all, £1 drinks on a Tuesday night and £2 cocktails on a Friday!

    I've only got one real friend (my boyfriend) at uni because of the drinking thing. All our flatmates drink. I skipped first year so it was pretty much impossible for me to make friends with coursemates - and any I have spoken to all go out drinking. All the societies, even the sports ones, go out drinking quite regularly as a 'social' thing. Hopefully next year I'll attend meetings for one society that does the drinking scene less (I hope).

    Also, don't rely on flatmates. Heck, we had to fill out a form and apparently all seven of us in my flat asked for a quiet flat. Is it quiet? ****ing hell no, it's absolutely horrible because they all drink and have people over all the time. (Even them watching a movie sober is noisy, thanks to the damn soundbar a guy brought back after Christmas). Our entire block is as noisy as hell. It really hasn't been good for my health.
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    (Original post by ilyicecream10)
    Hi, I'm similar to you. Not a fan of clubbing etc but I fell in love with Newcastle University so made it my firm. I'm just hoping I'll be able to fit in as I'm really not interested in the partying lifestyle and don't want to be in accommodation where everyone is partying as it would be annoying to cope with being sober as I don't drink haha.
    I suppose it is a case of cross your fingers. They are pulling down Ricky Road which was notorious, but unfortunately no accommodation will be totally peaceful. There *might* be *some* correlation between price and rowdiness, but if Daddy's paying then they might be tempted to overdo it and if they aren't worried about their deposit then it *could* even be worse. Hmm.

    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    I think that the Universities should make accommodations subject specific, as all the students doing real subjects would be constantly busy, creating a nice and calm learning (and living) environment. And all the sports science students etc. could trash their accommodation and do whatever they want without annoying anyone else. Obviously there are exceptions, but certain types of people usually are attracted to the certain types of subjects.

    Hoof! Now, now. No need to burn bridges here. Sports science is as valid as the others. I mean, sure, someone with significantly more coursework to do might be tamer. However, engineers and physicists have quite the reputation too, and artists are probably too busy to go bohemian so you might find it isn't as black and white as it seems. Also, if everyone was on the same course then you'd have nothing different to talk about. It'd be like being in a marriage with someone who works at the same job. You'd never be able to 'leave' work behind because everyone will have CS (or other subject here) on their mind.

    (Original post by New- Emperor)
    I think mate go be honist you are going to find most people like clubbing no matter where you go . Just because you don't drink dose not mean you can't go clubbing I found it to be a. Vital bonding experience . I had somone in my group of frends that didn't t drink and he partied as hard if not harder then us .In uni you will find there are lodes of other things to do besides clubbing there are sociatys or clubs for almost anything you can think of of the top of my head you could try.FootballAmerican footballHockeyIce HockeyQuiddich (yes it's a real thing)Games societyFetish societyRugbyClimbingFilmWritingR idingTravelIscoChristinan UnionThat's just a small selection of what's on offer if I werecyoubibwoukd go to the clubs and sociatys fair it's like the freshens fare but for sociatys you may even find a teetotal society. So I would say join one of them.

    Sound point. The issue here is not that I am teetotal. That's incidental. The issue here is that I don't like clubbing as I am dyspraxic and the sensory over-stimulation causes me essentially to shut down, so I'm no fun to be with and I hate it myself. I don't care if I am in a group with drinkers, so long as we meet somewhere relatively quiet where we can hear each other and I don't switch off!

    (Original post by Airmed)
    I go to Dundee uni and the union there is horrendous when it comes to drinking. I'm teetotal myself now and all that DUSA does it promote drinking; after all, £1 drinks on a Tuesday night and £2 cocktails on a Friday!I've only got one real friend (my boyfriend) at uni because of the drinking thing. All our flatmates drink. I skipped first year so it was pretty much impossible for me to make friends with coursemates - and any I have spoken to all go out drinking. All the societies, even the sports ones, go out drinking quite regularly as a 'social' thing. Hopefully next year I'll attend meetings for one society that does the drinking scene less (I hope).Also, don't rely on flatmates. Heck, we had to fill out a form and apparently all seven of us in my flat asked for a quiet flat. Is it quiet? ****ing hell no, it's absolutely horrible because they all drink and have people over all the time. (Even them watching a movie sober is noisy, thanks to the damn soundbar a guy brought back after Christmas). Our entire block is as noisy as hell. It really hasn't been good for my health.

    I sympathise with your pain. Of course, you can go out drinking and, er, not drink although it gets boring when they are all three sheets gone. And there is the failure of the matching system in action. People will abuse it in the hope they'll, say, not have to clean because the rest are clean freaks and so won't stand the mess. Huddersfield goes the opposite way, they don't even have a bar on campus! I mean, neither avenue is really the right way to go in my opinion. Bear in mind that a lot of people go to Uni to drink, as they haven't been drinking legally for long, they are away from parents etc. It is the role of the SU to react to student demand, and so they are really doing their job. it is, however, a pity they haven't completed their role in providing social events to all. The SU should really organise some less alcohol intensive events as well.

    Sorry for the long post, I've been away for a while!!!
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    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    I think that the Universities should make accommodations subject specific, as all the students doing real subjects would be constantly busy, creating a nice and calm learning (and living) environment. And all the sports science students etc. could trash their accommodation and do whatever they want without annoying anyone else. Obviously there are exceptions, but certain types of people usually are attracted to the certain types of subjects.
    I don't know anyone who doesn't go clubbing less than twice a week at the worst and they all do real subjects.
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    See this is why somthing like the film club would be good fir you
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    (Original post by tecwhizz)
    As the title suggests I'm not really into clubbing, in fact I'm teetotal. I know Newcastle has something of a reputation and whilst the university itself may deny it, no doubt it would attract the kind of students who do like clubbing, purely because of it's reputation. I'm not a fuddy-duddy and I'll happily be with people who do drink, but I just don't like clubbing, so alternative nightlife would be great! You know; quieter pubs, social things etc.

    I suppose my question is really 'Is there enough going on for someone like me, and enough people who perhaps aren't as keen on going clubbing that I could socialise with in the evenings.' The thought of being in a larger city appeals to me, but not if I've got no friends! I'm looking at York as a competitor and obviously the campus environment makes it a little bit tamer, but I thought I'd at least try to extract some information from other sources before coming to a decision on this aspect of the unis.

    Sorry for the long post!

    TL;DR: Is there enough to do and enough people to socialise with if I don't like clubbing and don't drink?
    Hey! Don't worry about this, I don't drink either and I hate clubbing or anything like that - much rather be all cosy inside watching a movie or reading a book. All I do is uni, study, and go to my societies and the occasional catch up with friends etc. I live about 5 mins from the clubs too but it hasn't been a problem with making friends. You might feel left out when they go out at night but that doesn't last long. I know people who went out 5 days a week during Fresher's and now they can barely manage one night out a month. I have struggled with making friends like yourself who are not into clubbing/are teetotals but I'm sure I'll find them one day!

    (Original post by hannahrob97)
    This also really worries me as well - I'm looking at possibly firming Newcastle (because the uni is good and I'm from there and don't want to go too far from home) and I'm not into clubbing at all!! I turned eighteen in October and haven't been out once, mostly because of anxiety reasons and the fact that I don't actually enjoy being drunk and around drunk people. I do drink and I do enjoy going out, I'm just not a fan of clubs. We are a minority, but there are some of us out there!!!


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    (Original post by ilyicecream10)
    Hi, I'm similar to you. Not a fan of clubbing etc but I fell in love with Newcastle University so made it my firm. I'm just hoping I'll be able to fit in as I'm really not interested in the partying lifestyle and don't want to be in accommodation where everyone is partying as it would be annoying to cope with being sober as I don't drink haha.
    (Original post by 0123456543210)
    Welcome to the society of teetotallers and quiet, moderate drinkers (me). What course you applied for?
 
 
 
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