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Would you live for eternity if given the chance to? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Would you want to live for eternity?
    No
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    60.89%
    Yes
    666
    39.11%

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    Nah.
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    I think I'd get bored to be honest if I lived forever. I'm sure I could enjoy it most of the time as long as I had family and friends but I think I would just get bored.

    "After all, to the well-organized mind, death is but the next great adventure."
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    I'd be concerned I would get bored half way through, but I have a feeling that won't come so why not, although it does depend on the specific terms, for instance, is ageing practically stopped?
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    How exactly would it work out in millions of years when the Earth no longer exists? You'd just float around in space for the rest of eternity? Sounds pretty grim to me.
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    (Original post by z33)
    You think darkness is your ally. You've merely adopted the dark. I was born in it, molded by it...
    My Banette~ !!! xd

    <3
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    why not... and only if the people i love do aswell
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    I'd only want to live forever if NOT everyone could too. It'd get so lazy, or so competitive that I'd be back to square 1 (i.e. how I am now).

    If living for eternity was an option, I think i'd feel more capable of achieving things. And to feel optimistic forever may even be possible and achievement may never even be needed. I could feel happier so long as i never feel that i'd be miserable forever.

    Then there's the idea of ageing or not ageing very much, or even how my life form changes, I could end up forgetting who i am. Though I coulld end up forgetting all sorts of stuff if I lived forever as the same person.
    Living for eternity...it's pretty much all i want atm aha.
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    Seems strange to those out of the know, but we will undoubtedly have telomere extension therapy within about 35 years- ageing has already been reversed in rats, inducing biological immortality, only apoptosis ceased and the rats developed leukaemia. There are a few teams of scientists around the world working on this (I'm lucky enough to know one of the project leaders, who I've discussed the issue with at incessant length), and the general feeling is that the process will be refined in approximately 10-12 years, with a conservative estimated placed at 30-35 years. It's now just a waiting game. After it's been perfected, there will be initial human trialling which I am hoping to take part in, and then it will become commercially available (although the price point will be absolutely ludicrous for a few years, after which governments will- I imagine- invest in roll-out programs and worldwide coverage will increase as the price falls). It's the same as any other technology- it takes time to develop.

    And to everyone saying it would get boring- why? The technological singularity will hit in about 2045, and the world as you know it will change literally every few months. Technological growth is rapidly exponential- the more things we know, the faster we can learn new things. Just look at how far we've come in the past ten years- technology has developed more since 2006 than it has since the dawn of human civilisation up until 2006. Computers become more powerful every day, things are optimised every day, and our knowledge expands every day. You would NEVER get bored. You would always have a perfectly fit and healthy body, so it's not like you're going to be an old person, unable to fully explore the new world. There is so much to come- human civilisation is very primitive right now, even though people seem to think we're highly advanced. 200 years from now, technology will be so far advanced that it would be incomprehensible to most people of today, yet to the people of the future (which, admittedly, will also be us, if we do achieve immortality) it will be as seamless to them as a smartphone is to us. We haven't even scratched the tip of the iceberg yet- whole brain emulation, Matrioshka brains, wormhole exploitation... the list goes on and on. Why wouldn't you want to be around to see all of that?

    Phew, that almost turned into a rant.

    My apologies for bringing science to the discussion, reading through the thread I see that it's mostly about Floaty McBeardycloud and "heaven".
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    Depends on the terms and conditions. Is it just me? Is it invulnerability or can I be killed? If not, what happens if someone chops off my head or something? Do I always regrow ****? Do I feel pain normally? What happens after the sun swallows the Earth?
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    (Original post by Cpt. Josh)
    Seems strange to those out of the know, but we will undoubtedly have telomere extension therapy within about 35 years- ageing has already been reversed in rats, inducing biological immortality, only apoptosis ceased and the rats developed leukaemia. There are a few teams of scientists around the world working on this (I'm lucky enough to know one of the project leaders, who I've discussed the issue with at incessant length), and the general feeling is that the process will be refined in approximately 10-12 years, with a conservative estimated placed at 30-35 years. It's now just a waiting game. After it's been perfected, there will be initial human trialling which I am hoping to take part in, and then it will become commercially available (although the price point will be absolutely ludicrous for a few years, after which governments will- I imagine- invest in roll-out programs and worldwide coverage will increase as the price falls). It's the same as any other technology- it takes time to develop.

    And to everyone saying it would get boring- why? The technological singularity will hit in about 2045, and the world as you know it will change literally every few months. Technological growth is rapidly exponential- the more things we know, the faster we can learn new things. Just look at how far we've come in the past ten years- technology has developed more since 2006 than it has since the dawn of human civilisation up until 2006. Computers become more powerful every day, things are optimised every day, and our knowledge expands every day. You would NEVER get bored. You would always have a perfectly fit and healthy body, so it's not like you're going to be an old person, unable to fully explore the new world. There is so much to come- human civilisation is very primitive right now, even though people seem to think we're highly advanced. 200 years from now, technology will be so far advanced that it would be incomprehensible to most people of today, yet to the people of the future (which, admittedly, will also be us, if we do achieve immortality) it will be as seamless to them as a smartphone is to us. We haven't even scratched the tip of the iceberg yet- whole brain emulation, Matrioshka brains, wormhole exploitation... the list goes on and on. Why wouldn't you want to be around to see all of that?

    Phew, that almost turned into a rant.

    My apologies for bringing science to the discussion, reading through the thread I see that it's mostly about Floaty McBeardycloud and "heaven".
    Absolutely this, biological immortality will definitely be a reality and we will essentially be like the elves in Lord of the Rings. Imagine how much richer and exciting a life can be when there are no time constraints on all the things you want to achieve.
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    You can learn so much and become proficient in so many skills and occupations; you can live your life a few times over doing different things. Of course I want to. But I hope other people get to live forever as well.
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    Yes.

    Forever is full of opportunity and possibilities.
    Death is final.
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    not with the way the world is atm, il pass thanks
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    I know there's a big chance I'll die in time, but we're getting to a stage as a species where immortality is worth contemplating because we can get there. I don't know about anyone else, but a few years into life and we get bored that's no excuse, well that's all it is, a silly excuse. There aren't any logical reasons to die. Life is all about the journey and I'd rather not reach that destination. The nothingness; the not existing, a plane of non existence where there isn't even a 'the' for the lack of nothingness. To be bored of life is bliss to not existing and not having the privilege to experience boredom. Now how? In any form possible in which the original me continues to exist. Clone my body and go for the good to be new brain transplant, maybe reverse ageing because there aren't any magic rules of space time stoping us and we have some of our best humans on that one.
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    If I could end it whenever I wanted then yes. If not, no.

    I don't greatly relish the prospect of wandering the earth millions of years after the human race extinguished itself.
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    (Original post by Cpt. Josh)
    Seems strange to those out of the know, but we will undoubtedly have telomere extension therapy within about 35 years- ageing has already been reversed in rats, inducing biological immortality, only apoptosis ceased and the rats developed leukaemia. There are a few teams of scientists around the world working on this (I'm lucky enough to know one of the project leaders, who I've discussed the issue with at incessant length), and the general feeling is that the process will be refined in approximately 10-12 years, with a conservative estimated placed at 30-35 years. It's now just a waiting game. After it's been perfected, there will be initial human trialling which I am hoping to take part in, and then it will become commercially available (although the price point will be absolutely ludicrous for a few years, after which governments will- I imagine- invest in roll-out programs and worldwide coverage will increase as the price falls). It's the same as any other technology- it takes time to develop.

    And to everyone saying it would get boring- why? The technological singularity will hit in about 2045, and the world as you know it will change literally every few months. Technological growth is rapidly exponential- the more things we know, the faster we can learn new things. Just look at how far we've come in the past ten years- technology has developed more since 2006 than it has since the dawn of human civilisation up until 2006. Computers become more powerful every day, things are optimised every day, and our knowledge expands every day. You would NEVER get bored. You would always have a perfectly fit and healthy body, so it's not like you're going to be an old person, unable to fully explore the new world. There is so much to come- human civilisation is very primitive right now, even though people seem to think we're highly advanced. 200 years from now, technology will be so far advanced that it would be incomprehensible to most people of today, yet to the people of the future (which, admittedly, will also be us, if we do achieve immortality) it will be as seamless to them as a smartphone is to us. We haven't even scratched the tip of the iceberg yet- whole brain emulation, Matrioshka brains, wormhole exploitation... the list goes on and on. Why wouldn't you want to be around to see all of that?

    Phew, that almost turned into a rant.

    My apologies for bringing science to the discussion, reading through the thread I see that it's mostly about Floaty McBeardycloud and "heaven".
    No worries, this is a purely scientific discussion! I'm all for philosophy but no one should be denied the choice to cure ageing. Please, if theres any way you could help add me to the testing list please do! 😂
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    Yeah.
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    Long enough to be satisfied with the technology...
    Specifically cars and gaming
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    I mean you could be wise as :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin: if you lived for eternity, think what wonders you'd see, not just on our planet but probably across the galaxy.

    But as a fail safe, I'm gonna choose "No". Just imagined if you got fugging trapped somewhere or buried alive or something - a la Misfits. :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin: that
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    If I could live without illness, aging or any other kind of human genetic ailment, absolutely. If I were to be able to get hit by a truck and come out all mangled and in extreme pain but still alive, no thanks. In other words, I'd take invincibility only if it came with invulnerability.
 
 
 
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