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Atheists/agnostics, how would you raise your children? watch

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    http://www.elephantjournal.com/2016/...the-faithless/ Like this...
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    (Original post by Thomb)




    I'd bring them up listening to this for inspiration.
    :confused: Better save up some sperm, you know postops can't get pregnant right?
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    I'd want to tell them that some people believe in a god or gods, other people don't, it's their personal choice as to whether they wish to believe or not. Also, that religion isn't needed for a person to be good, and that having no religion is not a justification for being bad to others. Maybe also that it's usually a sign of (intellectual) maturity to not be 100% certain either way, to respect the opinions of those they might disagree with, and try to see things from the other person's perspective - just as with most big issues in life.
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    I'd raise them to have a healthy scepticism of people who claim things that sound impossible and proffer no evidence.

    I'd also make sure they understood the cultural and historical significance of religion and not to be a **** about it.
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    (Original post by 41b)
    :confused: Better save up some sperm, you know postops can't get pregnant right?
    Occiali I'd raise them up on this...






    Just to make sure they've got proper values?
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    I'd raise them to have a healthy scepticism of people who claim things that sound impossible and proffer no evidence.

    I'd also make sure they understood the cultural and historical significance of religion and not to be a **** about it.
    Isn't that what religion tends to do?
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    Easy answer. Raise them without forcing my own unreligious beliefs on them. Then, once they are old enough they can choose to be as religious as they want.

    This really should be the way believers raise their kids but unfortunately too many force the religion on the kid.
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    What values would you teach them?

    Honesty, hard work, respect, integrity, ambition, equality and scepticism.

    Actively tell them there is no god?

    No. I don't really see why there would be a need for such a thing in an irreligious household. With an educated upbringing I see no reason why they would diverge from their inherent disbelief in any deity (as no one is born believing in a 'god').

    Room to teach them any spirituality?

    The Tooth Fairy and Father Christmas aside, not really.

    Thoughts on children becoming religious?

    I would be very surprised. I would challenge their views. This would inevitably lead me to disappointment. However, I would never abandon, ostracise or 'disown' my child for such a thing; such a concept is foreign to me (as it should be to any competent parent).

    Lol at that source.

    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    I'd raise them to have a healthy scepticism of people who claim things that sound impossible and proffer no evidence.

    I'd also make sure they understood the cultural and historical significance of religion and not to be a **** about it.
    Agreed on the first point, but can you elaborate on what you mean by the second?
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    (Original post by Years & Months)

    Agreed on the first point, but can you elaborate on what you mean by the second?
    That, although factually baseless, religion has played an important role in shaping our society and culture, and this reverberates today.

    I wouldn't want my children to grow up eschewing everything that references god or religion just on that basis.

    (Original post by IAmNero)
    Isn't that what religion tends to do?
    Well, yes, exactly.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    That, although factually baseless, religion has played an important role in shaping our society and culture, and this reverberates today.
    Are you referring to the 'Judeo-Christian' values that Western civilisation purports to be founded upon?
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    I'd raise them to be good, kind, selfless, independent, happy, moral, intelligent people. I would give them the tools and education to allow them to decide whether they have a faith or not. I would not restrict nor push on religious information. I wouldn't take them to church as I'm agnostic myself, but if they wanted to go to a place of worship, pray, whatever, I'd definitely allow them and support them.
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    (Original post by Years & Months)
    Are you referring to the 'Judeo-Christian' values that Western civilisation purports to be founded upon?
    I am referring to the cultural influence of, primarily, Christianity, yes.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    I am referring to the cultural influence of, primarily, Christianity, yes.
    So by making sure your children "understood the cultural and historical significance of religion", you meant Christianity, not religion as a whole?

    In what (positive) ways would you say Christianity has manifested itself in our society?
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    Well as it sits at the moment, I am athiest but the father would be Christian, and his family is heavily so.

    For starters, to respect his family we will be marrying in a church, which means I may have to be baptised. To be honest with not being religious I would rely on his family to guide me through whatever steps we'd need to take.

    Children would be Christened as it is still common for non-religious families to do so, and this allows the child more options in the future. My boyfriend only attends church occasionally (around quarterly), so children would attend with him. Once they reach a certain maturity (2/3 years old, decent communication and ability to make choices), we will give them the option and say something like "Daddy's going to church in the morning. Do you want to go with him?" which allows them to make their own decisions.

    I will never be one to force anyone into or out of a religion.
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    (Original post by Years & Months)
    So by making sure your children "understood the cultural and historical significance of religion", you meant Christianity, not religion as a whole?

    In what (positive) ways would you say Christianity has manifested itself in our society?
    Yes, I suppose so, although I would also want them to realise that religion in general is a cultural and historical influence on different societies all over the world.

    It's not really the point whether it has had positive or negative effects overall or even in any specific instance. My point is more that it is embedded in our art, literature, music, language, and, in general, heritage.

    I wouldn't want to raise a child who couldn't appreciate any of this because they felt the need to snort at every mention of religion. Nor would I want to raise one who would wish to remove all such influence, by, for instance, objecting to innocuous references to god wherever they can be found.
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    I'd teach them to be sceptical and to only believe in things via evidence, rationality, etc
    and I'll teach them to radically question every tradition and cultural custom that they are exposed to
    I will enforce this scepticality with an iron fist and there shall be no room for fairytales and conventions
    when they're under *my* roof they will live by the rule of logic, not magic. no santas, no easter bunnies, no sandmen.

    ...which means yeah, they'll probably grow up to be an "atheist" like their ol' man probably
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    It's not really the point whether it has had positive or negative effects overall or even in any specific instance. My point is more that it is embedded in our art, literature, music, language, and, in general, heritage.

    I wouldn't want to raise a child who couldn't appreciate any of this because they felt the need to snort at every mention of religion. Nor would I want to raise one who would wish to remove all such influence, by, for instance, objecting to innocuous references to god wherever they can be found.
    I am a little bit confused.

    Obviously some religious temples (to give one example) are spectacular, but why do you think that harbouring hostility to such monuments is entailed by viewing religion as dogma, false and harmful? I do not think it logically follows that because your children have no 'respect' for the vile masochisms espoused by religion that they become super-sensitive, and opposed to all representations or manifestations of past religious prevalence (at least not where this manifestation doesn't hold society back).
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    (Original post by Years & Months)
    I am a little bit confused.

    Obviously some religious temples (to give one example) are spectacular, but why do you think that harbouring hostility to such monuments is entailed by viewing religion as dogma, false and harmful? I do not think it logically follows that because your children have no 'respect' for the vile masochisms espoused by religion that they become super-sensitive, and opposed to all representations or manifestations of past religious prevalence (at least not where this manifestation doesn't hold society back).
    I don't think it necessarily is, although taking the view that religion is always harmful as a cultural phenomenon is a little too black and white for my tastes. These positions do, however, correlate. I would want to make sure that the one didn't entail the other in this particular case, that's all.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    I don't think it necessarily is, although taking the view that religion is always harmful as a cultural phenomenon is a little too black and white for my tastes.
    Quite right.

    Cherry-picking + weak human nature (search for 'purpose' or 'meaning' ) = possibility that religion provides a sense of purpose and source of hope for those with nothing else, so in that regard it can be useful. (Also the more cynical view that it can be used as a tool to achieve effective governance by encouraging homogeneity and unity over a set of shared values, religion in this case.)

    These positions do, however, correlate. I would want to make sure that the one didn't entail the other in this particular case, that's all.
    Correlation does not imply causation (how cliche, my apologies), of course.

    I simply think your fear is unfounded. I would be more worried about those being taught to respect all faiths/views as equal, as this can lead to the kinds of SJW-nonsense like the #RhodesMustFall campaign and 'no-platforming' those who dare criticise the notion that all cultures are 'equal' (-ly conducive to a stable society, to be more specific).
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    (Original post by Years & Months)
    Correlation does not imply causation (how cliche, my apologies), of course.

    I simply think your fear is unfounded. I would be more worried about those being taught to respect all faiths/views as equal, as this can lead to the kinds of SJW-nonsense like the #RhodesMustFall campaign and 'no-platforming' those who dare criticise the notion that all cultures are 'equal' (-ly conducive to a stable society, to be more specific).
    No, although I think in this case they share some common causes, and follow some of the same thought processes.

    Oh, indeed. As you pointed out, I was mainly talking about Christianity.
 
 
 
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