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    Yes of course it is ffs, what is ironic is that those who complain about it are the ones that desire it haha.

    Although having said that I have given exams at various centres, at the independent school there were like 25/150 extra timers I would estimate whereas at FE college there was like only 2/3.

    Interesting thought.
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    Do I think it's fair that people get extra time because of 'slow handwriting' or get laptops AND extra time because they have bad handwriting? No!! Especially considering people type faster than they write, it's a complete joke that I have to rush to finish an essay, while someone else gets extra time and a laptop because they can't be bothered to write neatly 😡
    Obviously if people have genuine disabilities that prevent them for completing an exam within the allotted time then I think it's fair, but unless that's the case, I don't think extra time should be given out.
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    I think in many cases it is fair, and that if I had the choice I would definitely keep it as it is because some people really need it. However there are numerous people who do not require it and are given it. In some exams it makes little difference, but for some it is a deal breaker between getting a decent grade and not. I know at least a couple of people who are given extra time in exams due to dyslexia, when there apparent dyslexia is either non existent or so mild it makes no difference at all (I'm talking about A/A* grade english students here, with no help for handwriting or reading).
    This, in my opinion, is unfair on everyone because these people have time to check through all their work thoroughly unlike others, and this can have a massive impact on a mathematics grade for example. As for me complaining due to desiring it, I have no desire or need for it as I usually finish exams well within the time limit and I have no issues with my grades. What does annoy me though, is that people who are clearly not inhibited by their dyslexia and are fast writers/readers are getting 25% extra time, giving them the advantage over others of similar capability, allowing them to get better grades then similar people of their calibre. For that reason I think that when medical exams are done to identify dyslexia and other causes for extra time, they should be separately evaluated for the severity that it affects them in areas of writing, numeracy, reading, listening etc.
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    I think it is for certain disabilities and special needs.
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    (Original post by chrlhyms)
    I know people who are eligible for extra time that don't have a disability at all, they were just allowed it because they were off school for like a week? and apparently they get extra marks added on too? like 10%... I thought that was extremely unfair as she is extremely capable and got like all A*'s in her mocks in normal exam conditions....
    I think you misunderstand the system. There are 2 separate thing: access arrangements (which may be awarded for a long term condition or a temporary problem) and special consideration which is only ever awarded for a temporary issue such as illness at the time of the exam or a crisis (homelessness, mother dying etc). You only qualify for access arrangements for a long term condition if there is assessed evidence you need it AND it is your normal way of working and you use the extra time, reader etc in all in-school tests.

    It is possible that you might get access arrangements (e.g. extra time, laptop) temporarily for an injury - e.g. a broken arm - that affects your speed of working. You can also be awarded special consideration for being ill at the time of an exam or having some other serious issue (e.g. a close relative) but the biggest uplift you can get for this is 5% and the most usual uplift is 2-3%.
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    Extra time shouldn't be awarded for people that have bad handwriting ever.
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    Of course it's fair! It's to make the playing field level. I get extra time, rest breaks if needed, and a laptop, although the laptop isn't much use for 2 out of 4 of my subjects ahahaha
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    I think sometimes it is necessary, but it's not a perfect system. Some people will need more than 25% extra and for some 25% is too much and gives them an unfair advantage.

    It's also too untargeted. For example if you get extra time on the basis of slow and messy handwriting then you should be given it in more heavy writing subjects like A-level biology, but shouldn't be allowed it in A-level maths.
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    (Original post by Tinka99)
    Curious about your thoughts.
    Yes I think it's fair.
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    I think sometimes it is necessary, but it's not a perfect system. Some people will need more than 25% extra and for some 25% is too much and gives them an unfair advantage.

    It's also too untargeted. For example if you get extra time on the basis of slow and messy handwriting then you should be given it in more heavy writing subjects like A-level biology, but shouldn't be allowed it in A-level maths.
    Slow and messy handwriting isn't really a condition. It more likely a symptom of another condition like dyslexia, which will also mean that they'll generally be slower to read and interpret things in comparison to those without a condition..
    If the slow and messy handwriting was a result of some kind of accident prior to the exam like a broken hand/arm, then I'm sure they'll have a scribe to write for them and obviously using a scribe will take longer than writing on your own, so they rightfully receive extra time.
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    (Original post by jawsontheflooor)
    Extra time shouldn't be awarded for people that have bad handwriting ever.
    Unless they have a condition that affects their writing presentation, they won't get extra time
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    (Original post by TheTechN1304)
    Do I think it's fair that people get extra time because of 'slow handwriting' or get laptops AND extra time because they have bad handwriting? No!! Especially considering people type faster than they write, it's a complete joke that I have to rush to finish an essay, while someone else gets extra time and a laptop because they can't be bothered to write neatly 😡
    Obviously if people have genuine disabilities that prevent them for completing an exam within the allotted time then I think it's fair, but unless that's the case, I don't think extra time should be given out.
    When does this ever happen? You don't get extra time because you have bad handwriting.

    It's more like you have dyslexia/dyspraxia which among other things, also affects your handwriting presentation and hence, you get extra time.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    When does this ever happen? You don't get extra time because you have bad handwriting.
    People do.
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    (Original post by Compost)
    People do.
    Which people?
    As far as I'm aware, you'll just have to practice writing neater in your own time. The same goes for people who take long to finish exams, they'll have to do timed practice exams in their own time.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Slow and messy handwriting isn't really a condition. It more likely a symptom of another condition like dyslexia, which will also mean that they'll generally be slower to read and interpret things in comparison to those without a condition..
    If the slow and messy handwriting was a result of some kind of accident prior to the exam like a broken hand/arm, then I'm sure they'll have a scribe to write for them and obviously using a scribe will take longer than writing on your own, so they rightfully receive extra time.
    It could be a symptom of another condition. In that case the other relevant symptoms(slower to read and interpret) should also be considered. Disadvantages should be considered case by case and each can be debated. I feel that reading speed is more important than writing speed since you have to read a lot in a job or in further education whereas in many cases things will be typed rather than handwritten. If you hand write something then it's likely to be for your own reference, in which case legibility is less of an issue so you can rush it. That's a separate discussion though.
    Or there might not be a diagnosable underlying condition.
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    I don't know why people get so hung up with others getting extra time for legitimate reasons. You aren't directly competing with them. If you aren't fairly certain you'll get immaculate grades across the board, you should focus on addressing your own failings rather than ***** about what you perceive to be an unfairness.
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    It always used to irk me when I'd have to race through an exam because I knew I'd be pushed for time, and even then I'd still barely finish or not finish. Then I'd look over to all the extra time-ers writing as calmly as you'd please.:grumble:

    In some exams, those extra 15 minutes really do make a difference. Especially when you're a slow thinker.
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    Definitely, if your brain doesn't work as quick as the 'average student' then you should be given extra time so your brain has time to function in the same way as the 'average student'. The whole point of specified time to do each exam is because the exam boards feel it is enough time for the average mine to function to it's highest potential - if you are physically/mentally incapable of having your brain function in this time then of course extra time should be allowed. I never feel salty when people get extra time, if I needed it I would have it, but I don't need it, so I don't think people who don't get extra time should be bothered unless they feel they need it - then they should appeal
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    (Original post by surina16)
    No. Most of the people don't deserve it and fail the tests on purpose, but because it's such a stupid system, they get granted the extra time, do amazingly well in all their exams, and then boost up the grade boundaries for the rest.
    I also agree with the above posts about no extra time at any other point in life.
    I have ADHD and autism. This gives me a significantly reduced processing speed and wrecks my concentration. Without the extra time I'd be severely disadvantaged and wouldn't be able to achieve my true grades. I have an IQ of about 150, so in theory I should be getting consistently high grades right? Wrong. My ADHD and autism means that while I have a high IQ, I can't concentrate and end up failing without extra time. The extra time is there to level the playing field for people like myself. Besides, it's becoming harder and harder to actually get extra time. Now most of the people who have it are disabled. So don't even try claiming that we don't deserve it.
    Spoiler:
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    I'm not trying to brag here, I'm just using myself as an example.
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    (Original post by Compost)
    It depends what we think the purpose of exams is. If they are solely testing your knowledge of the specification and and ability to apply it then it is fair. If exam results might be taken as an indication of your abilities and wider employability then I would say it is far more questionable. If an employer sees that a candidate has a decent collection of GCSEs then they expect that they can read and write for themselves and work at a decent pace.

    Regardless,the current system is massively open to abuse and widely abused. The difference in the way the rules are applied varies widely between schools and is in no way a level playing field.

    I still scrupulously provide every scribe, piece of pink paper, minute of extra time, laptop and lone room I have to, I just don't agree with most of it.
    That is a very poor attitude from a teacher - I've been a SENCo and we are very strict with these applications. These students know the material but have issues in recording it in writing when there is a time limit.

    In work you don't have to 'deliver' in these circumstances - the exam room is not the real world.
 
 
 
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